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THREE HUNDRED TWENTY-FOURTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Of the 



TOWN OFFICERS 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1974 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreports1974medf 



324th ANNIVERSARY 




ANNUAL REPORT 



of the 



TOWN OFFICERS 



IN MEMORIAM 




NICHOLAS N. GUGLIOTTA 



IN MEMORIAM 



WILLIAM S. BLANCHARD 
Pound Keeper 1939 - 1974 



NICHOLAS N. GUGLIOTTA 

Police Officer 1946 - 1970 
Acting Police Chief 1958 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 

Population as of January 1, 1974: 10,006 

Assessed Valuation 1974: $68,500,360.00 

Tax Rate 1974: 

1/1/74 - 6/30/74 $52.25 

7/1/74 - 6/30/75 $55.75 

Area: 14.43 Square Miles Miles of Highway: 56 

Elevation at Town Hall approximately 180 feet above mean sea level. 

Medfield is in the following Voting Districts: 

Representative to Congress - 10th Congressional District 

Margaret M. Heckler, 30 Colburn Rd. , Wellesley Hills, Mass 

Governor's Councillor - 2nd District 

George F. Cronin, Jr., 58 Cerdan Ave., Boston, Mass. 

State Senator - Middlesex and Norfolk District 

David H. Locke, 15 Ordway Rd., Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

State Representative - 59th Middlesex 

George R. Sprague, 5 Powderhouse Lane, Sherborn, Mass. 

United States Senators: 
Edward W. Brooke 
Edward M. Kennedy 
J. F. Kennedy Memorial Building, Boston, Mass. 



ANNUAL REPORT 
TOWN OFFICERS 



William F. Nourse 



MODERATOR 



Term expires 1975 



Nancy J. Preston 



Edward F. Barrett, Jr. 



Joseph L. Marcionette 
Arthur L. Farrar 
Harry A. Kelleher 



Melville J. Mills 
Joseph S. Kennedy 
Roger E. Hardy 



TOWN CLERK 



TREASURER 



SELECTMEN 



ASSESSORS 



Term expires 1976 



Term expires 1975 



Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 



Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Phillip J. Burr 

Sonja J. Siders, resigned 

John C. Rudisill* 

David E. Hansen* 

Dawn I. Austin 

Thomas McMurtrie 

Everette Fuller, resigned 

^elected to fill unexpired term 



Term 


expires 


1975 


Term 


expires 


1975 


Term 


expires 


1975 


Term 


expires 


1975 


Term 


expires 


1976 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1977 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Mary M. Hay 
Laura H. Smith 
Kenneth G. Fettig 
Jane M. Guthrie 
David Wilmarth 
James F. Barton 



Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



Charles H. Rayner, Jr. 



Term expires 1977 



PLANNING BOARD 



C. Richard McCullough 
Burgess P. Standley 
Sandra G. Munsey 
Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. 
Donald J. MacDonald 



PARK COMMISSIONERS 



Eric W. O'Brien 
Nancy E. LaJoice, resigned 
Genie T. Roberts* 
Warren F. Sheard 
William J. Heller 
Andrew F. Thompson, Jr. 
Arthur F. McEvoy 
Barbara F. Maliff 

*elected to fill unexpired term 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Charles D. Sloan 

Hazel R. Frank, State Appointed 

Richard C. J. Palson 

Bruce J. Oravec 

Michael Tammero 

FIRE CHIEF 

Joseph E. Ryan 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

William H. Mann 
SERGEANTS 



Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 



Term 


expires 


1975 


Term 


expires 


1975 


Term 


expires 


1975 


Term 


expires 


1975 


Term 


expires 


1976 


Term 


expires 


1976 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1977 



Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 



E. Nina Iafolla 



George W. Kingsbury 



PATROLMEN 



Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
John T. Garvey, Jr. 
Ronald E. Kerr 



Robert B. Ripley 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 
Raymond J. Wheeler 



PLUMBING INSPECTOR 



George E. Nye 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 



Frederick C. Conley 



Term expires 1975 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS, WATER AND SEWER 
William E. McCarthy Term expires 1975 

BOARD OF HEALTH 



Frederic C. Temple 
Joseph A. Marinella 
Richard H. Whelan 



Joseph A. Roberts 
Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. 
Allison T. Carr 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



WATER AND SEWER COMMISSIONERS 



Allen F. Holmes 

John D. Williams 

John C. Willis, Resigned 

Charles F. Cotton 

Donald W. Blair, Associate Member 

Kenneth W. Macek, Associate Member 



Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 



Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 



Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1975 



TREE WARDEN 
Ellis N. Allen Term expires 1975 

SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 
Ellis N. Allen Term expires 1975 

FIELD DRIVERS AND FENCE VIEWERS 



Rebel L. Palumbo 
Herbert B. Burr 



Richard A. Ellsworth 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1975 



Term expires 1975 



Roy Owen 



William J. Jennette 



POUND KEEPER 



DOG OFFICER 



ASSISTANT DOG OFFICER 



Term expires 1975 



Term expires 1975 



Ruth Luke 



Term expires 1975 
October 1 



Michael Tammero 



J. Hardy Henderson 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 



PUBLIC WEIGHER 



Richard A. Ellsworth 



OFFICIAL KEEPER OF THE TOWN CLOCK 



Austin C. Buchanan 



Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
John T. Garvey 
E. Nina Iafolla 
Ronald E. Kerr 
George W. Kingsbury 



CONSTABLES' 



Term expires 1975 



Term expires 1975 



Term expires 1975 



Term expires 1975 



William H. Mann 
Robert E. Naughton 
Robert B. Ripley 
Keven W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 
Raymond J. Wheeler 



KEEPERS OF THE LOCK-UP 



William M. Anderson 
Clayton M. Balcom 
Anthony A. Bertone 
Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
Vincent M. Cellucci 
Robert Davis, Jr. 
Michael J. Donahue 
John T. Garvey 
Thomas Gugliotta, Jr. 



E. Nina Iafolla 
Ronald E. Kerr 
George W. Kingsbury 
William H. Mann 
Robert E. Naughton 
Robert B. Ripley 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 
Raymond J. Wheeler 



8 



POLICE MATRONS 



Jessie A. Erskine 
Elizabeth Hinkley 
Joyce F. Johnson 
Mary I. MairEtienne 
Priscilla Mahoney 
Elisabeth T. Mann 



Linda Matarazzo, Resigned 
Alida B. Myette, Resigned 
Mary T. Nyren 
Patricia A. Rioux. 
Marie E. St. Pierre 
Mary L. Solari 



TRAFFIC SUPERVISORS 



Elizabeth R. Hinkley 

Joyce F. Johnson 

Verna J. Kane 

Priscilla Mahoney 

Elisabeth T. Mann 

Linda J. Matarazzo, Resigned 

Alida B. Myette, Resigned 

Patricia A. Rioux 

Marie E. St. Pierre 

Mary L. Solari 



Term 


expires 


June, 


1975 


Term 


expires 


June, 


1975 


Term 


expires 


June, 


1975 


Term 


expires 


June, 


1975 


Term 


expires 


June, 


1975 


Term 


expires 


June, 


1975 


Term 


expires 


June, 


1975 


Term 


expires 


June, 


1975 


Term 


expires 


June, 


1975 


Term 


expires 


June, 


1975 



PROVISIONAL PERMANENT 
INTERMITTENT PATROLMEN 



William M. Anderson 
Anthony A. Bert one 
Vincent M. Cellucci 
Paul F. Davis, Resigned 
Michail J. Donahue 
Robert L. Davis 



Thomas Gugliotta, Jr 
George Hinkley 
Robert E. Naughton 
John E. O'Brien 
Robert D. Taylor 



PERMANENT INTERMITTENT 
PATROLMEN 



Anthony A. Bertone 
Edward J. Buckley 
Patrick J. Caulfield 
Robert L. Davis, Resigned 
Edward J. Farioli 
Joseph P. Flaherty, Jr. 



Russell N. Mulgrew 
Robert E. Naughton 
David F. Riggs , Resigned 
David S. Sloan 
Gregory Tanger 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 



William H. Anderson 
James 0. Aronson 
Albert Baima 
Clayton M. Balcom 
A. Charles Baranowski 
Elton Bassett 
Steven E. Bassett 
Allan K. Belcher 



Paul Hinkley 
Peter S. Hinkley 
Frank J. Hoffman 
William J. Jennette 
Russell H. Johnston, Jr 
William D. Jones 
James T. Kashalena 
Howard L. Kilmer 



Anthony A. Bertone 
Herbert Bennett 
Donald Bicket 
Lawrence Brackett 
Leo M. Brennan 
James A. Brown 
Chester A. Burks 
Herbert B. Burr 
Herbert L. Burr 
Richard Cantrell 
Edward L. Carreiro 
William Carlson 
Joseph Carvalho 
Michael Cellucci 
Vincent M. Cellucci 
Mario R. Centamore, Jr 
Clinton M. Clark 
James Concannon 
Paul F. Davis 
Russell A. Devereau 
Michael Donahue 
David C. Egy 
Robert Eklund 
Richard A. Ellsworth 
John Evans 
Jeffrey M. Farrell 
John D. Farrell 
Dana P. Friend 
John Geraghty 
Arnold U. Giard 
Elwin Graves 
John T. Grover 
Robert R. Grover 
Vincent Hallowell 
Joseph Harkins 
Walter Hersee 
George W. Hinkley 
Thomas Ward 



Robert Kreger 

John Kubacki 

Thomas LaPlante 

Donald Lawrence 

Donald H. Lee 

William J. Marchand, Jr. 

Robert McGrath 
Thomas W. McNeeley, Jr. 
Warren Maloney 
Robert Meaney, Jr. 
George P. Michel 
Hugh Mick 
James E. Morris 
James H. Morris 
John Mortz 
Robert E. Naughton 
Frank S. Newell, Jr. 
John E. O'Brien 
James W. O'Connell 
Rebel L. Palumbo 
Mario Pederzini 
Leo J. Prince 
Harold Pritoni 
Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. 
Walter F. Reynolds, Sr. 
Warren H. Robinson 
Joel Rosenfeld 
Joseph E. Ryan 
George St. Pierre 
Robert Sessa 
David Sexton 
David S. Sloan 
Carl Sheridan 
George E. Smith, Jr. 
Robert D. Taylor 
John Varnum, Jr. 
Thomas Watson 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



Leslie J. Howlett 



Term expires 1977 



TOWN COUNSEL 



Charles Fuller, Jr. 



Term expires 1975 



VETERANS' AGENT 



Paul F. Curran 



Term expires 1975 



VETERANS' DIRECTOR 



Paul F. Curran 



Term expires 1975 



10 



VETERANS' GRAVES OFFICER 



G. Marshall Chick 



Term expires 1975 



Paul F. Curran 



BURIAL AGENT 



Term expires 1975 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 



Mary MairEtienne 
Beatrice Bangs 
John F. Ganley 



Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 



Herbert B. Burr 



Term expires June 2, 1975 



ASSISTANT BUILDING INSPECTOR 



Rebel L. Palumbo 



Term expires April, 1975 



PLUMBING INSPECTOR 



George E. Nye 



Term expires 1975 



ASSISTANT PLUMBING INSPECTOR 



Walter R. Nye 



Term expires 1975 



WIRING INSPECTOR 



Joseph F. Erskine 



Term expires 1975 



ASSISTANT WIRING INSPECTOR 



Thomas 0' Toole 



Term expires 1975 



Walter R. Nye 



George E. Nye 



GAS INSPECTOR 



ASSISTANT GAS INSPECTOR 



Term expires 1975 



Term expires 1975 



BOARD OF APPEALS FOR ZONING, SUBDIVISION 
CONTROL AND BUILDING BY-LAWS 



James T. Regan 

James 0. Aronson 

Ralph C. Cope land 

William F. Spang, Associate Member 



Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 

Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1975 



11 



BOARD OF APPEALS FOR ZONING ENFORCING OFFICER 



Herbert B. Burr 



Term expires 1975 



DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 



John 0. Ekstrom 
George M. Graham, Jr. 
Walter Frank 
Benjamin Astley 
Donald Harding 
Keith Costa, Resigned 
Clayton H. Haigh 
William P. Mikelonis 



Term 


expires 


1975 


Term 


expires 


1975 


Term 


expires 


1976 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1978 


Term 


expires 


1979 


Term 


expires 


1979 


Term 


expires 


1979 



DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 



Austin C. Buchanan Term expires 1975 

DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 



John E. Varnum, Jr. 



Term expires 1975 



CIVIL DEFENSE COMMUNICATIONS 
CHIEF RADIO OPERATOR 



Dana P. Friend 



Michael Cellucci 
John Chick 



Term expires 1975 



CIVIL DEFENSE, RADIO OPERATORS 



Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 



David M. Sexton 



UNDERWATER RESCUE AND RECOVERY 



Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. 



Constance E. Waite 



SHELTER MANAGER TRAINEE 



DISPATCHER 



Term expires 1975 



Term expires 1975 



Frederick Rogers, Jr. Term expires 1975 

CIVIL DEFENSE RESCUE SQUAD 



David M. Sexton, Sergeant 
Michael Cellucci, Corporal 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr., Corporal 
Richard S. Armstrong 



Robert Grover 

Walter Hersee 

Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr, 

Janice Newell 



12 



John M. Chick 
Dana P. Friend 



Vernon J. Patton 
Wayne R. Stokes 



Jean St. Pierre 



AUXILIARY POLICE, CIVIL DEFENSE, SQUAD ONE 
John E. Varnum, Jr., Captain 



James 0. Aronson, Lieutenant 
Vincent M. Cellucci, Lieutenant 
Mario Pederzini, Sergeant 



OFFICERS 



Richard Armstrong 
Thomas J. Barry 
Jeffrey F. Bibby 
Michael Cellucci 
Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. 
Ghassoub P. Frangie 
Dana P. Friend 
William Hancock, Jr. 
William J. Jennette 



Warren Robinson, Sergeant 
Robert Sessa, Sergeant 
William E. Thayer, Sergeant 



James T. Kashalena 
Thomas LaPlante, Jr. 
Donald Letner 
William J. Marchand 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 
David M. Sexton 
Edward A. Taraskkiewicz 
Robert D. Taylor 
John E. Varnum, Sr. 



Constance E. Waite 



AUXILIARY POLICE, CIVIL DEFENSE, SQUAD TWO 

OFFICERS 



William E. Thayer, Sergeant 
Leroy Carter 



Edward A. Taraskkiewicz 
John R. Costello 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Ellen E. Gifford 

Richard M. Heiligmann 

Robert Hilton 

Mario Pederzini 

Caroline Standley 

Robert Kinsman 

Hanson C. Robbins 

Robert Bryant, Associate Member 

Joseph Donnelly, Associate Member 

Jane Minesinger, Associate Member 



Term 


expires 


1975 


Term 


expires 


1975 


Term 


expires 


1975 


Term 


expires 


1976 


Term 


expires 


1976 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1977 


Term 


expires 


1975 


Term 


expires 


1975 


Term 


expires 


1975 



Graham Blandy 
Kenneth S. Brock 



SEWER ASSESSMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 



Charles F. Cotton 



Robert L. Melican 
Charles H. Peck 



13 



INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Robert S. Capers, Jr. 
Edward J. MacDonald 
Alfred B. Chaplin 



Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 



TOWN HALL SPACE ALLOCATION COMMITTEE 



Frederick C. Conley 
Donald Harding 



William H. Mann 
William E. McCarthy 



MEDFIELD DESIGNEE ADVISORY BOARD, MBTA 
Frederick C. Conley Term expires 1975 

METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



Harry A. Kelleher 



Term expires August 3, 1977 
BUILDING CODE COMMITTEE 



Herbert B. Burr 

Joseph E. Ryan 

Francis J. Mastropieri 

Nicholas Laverghetta 

Joseph T. Cunning 

James W. Brock, Associate Member 



Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1975 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



Gerald Bangs 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


, 1975 


Virginia Couper 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


, 1975 


David Flanders, Resigned 


Term 


expires 


November 


16. 


, 1975 


Barbara Fetteroll 


Term 


expires 


November 


16 


, 1975 


Charles A. Doyle 


Term 


expires 


November 


16. 


, 1976 


Madeleine I. Harding 


Term 


expires 


November 


16. 


, 1976 


Elizabeth L. Martin 


Term 


expires 


November 


16. 


, 1976 


John. J. Norton, Resigned 


Term 


expires 


November 


16. 


, 1977 


Dorothy Anastasia 


Term 


expires 


November 


16. 


, 1977 


Edwin C. Flaherty 


Term 


expires 


November 


16. 


1977 


Alison M. Ulrich 


Term 


expires 


November 


16, 


, 1977 


SPECIAL BICENTENNIAL AND 


325TH ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE 







Marie M. Burke 
Pauline Coulter 
Barbara Cronin 
Robert E. Dooley 
Ralph C. Good, Jr. 
Pauline M. Goucher 
Beverly L. Hallowell 
William L. Hallowell 



John Harney, resigned 
Dorothy Kane 
Shirley Maples 
James Moynihan 
Alida B. Myette 
Edward A. Otting 
Patricia Rioux 
Michael Tammero 



14 



ENERGY PLANNING AND COORDINATING COMMITTEE 



Austin C. Buchanan 
Frederick C. Conley 



Joseph E. Ryan 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



William H. Mann 
William E. McCarthy 



Eleanor Anes 

Arthur F. McCarty 

Ann S. Mentzer 

Laura H. Smith 

Donald J. MacDonald 

Roy A. McQuillan 

Claire W. Reed, Resigned 

Robert H. Luke, Jr. 

William F. McCarthy, Associate Member 

David L. Wilmarth, Associate Member 



Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1975 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1975 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1975 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1976 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1976 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1976 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1977 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1977 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1975 


Term 


expires 


June 


30, 


1975 



AMBULANCE COMMITTEE 



Austin C. Buchanan 
Frederick C. Conley 



William H. Mann 
Joseph E. Ryan 



Robert Ceresi 



James D. Sullivan 

REPRESENTATIVE TO SOUTHWEST AREA 
SELECTMEN'S COORDINATING COMMITTEE 
SU B-COMMITTEE ON REGIONAL SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL 

Term expires 1975 
DATA PROCESSING ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



James Brennan 

Arthur L. Farrar 

Robert Stokes 

John S. Warren 

Frederick C. Conley, Ex-officio 



Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1975 
Term expires 1975 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING TEAM 



Arthur L. Farrar 



Neal Olsen 



Charles Peck 



15 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY PLANNING BOARD 



MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 



Robert M. Finn 
Stanley C. Rossier 
Ward Smith 
Jane E. Minesinger 
Marjorie Temple 
Carol Shaw 
Hanson Robbins 
Margaret Bancroft 



Term expires June 28, 1975 

Term expires June 28, 1975 

Term expires June 28, 1975 

Term expires June 28, 1976 

Term expires June 28, 1976 

Term expires June 28, 1977 

Term expires June 28, 1977 

Term expires Juen 28, 1977 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY BOARD OF HEALTH 



INSPECTORS OF SANITATION 



Ferial Morrissette 



John J. Keefe 



BOARD OF HEALTH-ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Marie M. Burke 
Madeleine I. Harding 
Ferial R. Morrissette 



John J. Keefe 



Nancy J. Preston 
Dr. A. Ritchie Stagg 
Mrs. Porter Whitney, VNA 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 



SENIOR HIGH ADULT ADVISORY BOARD 



Ann M. Capone 
Gerard F. Gallagher 
Joan A. Fuller 
Patrina A. Gallagher 
Robert H. Luke, Jr. 
Ruth S. Luke 



Maybelle E. Maguire 
Gloria G. Morris 
Mary T. Nyren 
Paul E. Nyren 
Lawrence M. Odell 
Linda H. Odell 



JUNIOR HIGH ADULT ADVISORY BOARD 



Beverly E. Ferran 
Herbert A. Ferran 
Patricia Bryda 
John L. Dearness 
Theodore J. Bryda 



Alexandra A. Nickerson 
Mrs. A. Coffone 
Anthony A. Coffone 
Mary Louise Cribbin 
Julia A. Flavin 



16 



Nancy F. Deamess 
Sylvia L. Bready 
Paul K. Bready 
Deborah J. Ellis 
Marie I. Hughes 
Jay W. Hughes 
Patricia A. Klickstein 
Morris Klickstein 
Judith M. McjSue 



James J. Kilcoyne 
Elizabeth V. Kilcoyne 
Eileen V. Alley 
Nancy J. McNeeley 
Thomas W. McNeeley, Jr 
Helga Urban 
Melvin J. Urban 
Richard M. Ezequelle 



RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Arthur L. Farrar 
Phillip J. Burr 
Paul Valzania 



Carol P. Shaw 



Elizabeth L. Martin 

Robert Kinsman 

C. Richard McCullough 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY MODERATOR 



WARRANT COMMITTEE 



Donald H. Batting 

David E. Hansen, Resigned 

Jane P. McCarty 

Paul H. Snyder * 

Charles H. Peck 

Elmer 0. Portmann 

James A. Sproul 

Charles Griffin 

Richard J. Lyman 

Paul Valzania 

^appointed to 



Term expires April 1 
Term expires April 1 
Term expires April 1 
Term expires April 1 
Term expires April 1 
Term expires April 1 
Term expires April 1 
Term expires April 1 
Term expires April 1 

Term expires April 1 
fill unexpired term 



1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1977 
1977 
1977 



SCHOOL PLANNING AND BUILDING COMMITTEE 



David R. Iverson 
Maryellen M. Valzania 
Philip J. Burr 
Ralph Parmagiane 
Robert S. Capers, Jr. 



Term expires April 1, 1975 

Term expires April 1, 1975 

Term expires April 1, 1976 

Term expires April 1, 1976 

Term expires April 1, 1977 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



Andrew R. Sifflard, resigned 
Eugene Sullivan, resigned 
Neal R. Olsen 
Robert P. Ceresi 



Term expires November 30, 1974 

Term expires November 30, 1975 

Term expires November 30, 1976 

Term expires November 30, 1977 



17 



REGIONAL REFUSE DISPOSAL COMMITTEE 

Robert P. Ceresi Joseph L. Marcionette Peyton C. Marsh 

MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 

Pauline M. Goucher Leo G. Shiels 

Joseph L. Marcionette James Tubridy 

Lindsey Ripley 

DEPUTY MODERATOR 

Dr. Frank E. Marsh, Jr. Term expires April 1975 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TAX COLLECTOR 



DEPUTY COLLECTORS 
Peter Bartkewicz Clarissa C. Supko Virginia Kinter 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY FIRE CHIEF 

Walter Reynolds, Jr., Deputy Fire Chief 

Frederick A. Rogers, Captain 

Clinton M. Clark, Lieutenant 

Ellis N. Allen, Lieutenant 

William B. Reynolds, Lieutenant 

Mario Pederzini, Clerk 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TOWN CLERK 

Marie M. Burke, Ass't. Town Clerk 

ASSISTANT CLERKS 
Kathleen N. Conners Pauline M. Goucher Charlotte R. Randolph 



18 



APPOINTED BY CHAIRMAN OF SELECTMEN, 

CHAIRMAN OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 

and MODERATOR to 

REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Thomas A. Procop Term expires July, 1977 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TREASURER 



Charlotte R. Randolph 
Ass't. Treasurer 



19 



DEPARTMENTAL 
REPORTS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1974 



21 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



As we approach the 325th Anniversary of the incorporation of our 
town, it seemed noteworthy to quote from the Constitution of the Medfield 
Improvement Association which was adopted April 15, 1881. 

"The object of this Association is to awaken and encourage in 
the community a sentiment and a spirit which will act for the 
common interest; to create or stimulate in the individual a 
regard for the elevation and improvement of the community, 
thereby securing better hygienic conditions in our homes and 
surroundings; an improvement of our streets, sidewalks, and 
public grounds; a protection of natural scenery; and the 
building up and beautifying the whole town; and so enhancing 
the value of its property and rendering it a still more 
inviting place of residence." 

Nearly a century later we, as members of the Board of Selectmen, 
in company with other town officials and public-spirited citizens, are 
actively working toward these same objectives. 

With a pledge to continue these ideals, the Board reorganized on 
March 26, 1974 with Harry A. Kelleher as Chairman, Joseph L. Marcionette, 
Clerk and Arthur L. Farrar, third member. 

TOWN HALL 

During the course of the year several changes were made in the 
town hall to reorganize the structure of town government and to improve 
the delivery of municipal services. Town hall employees were placed 
under the jurisdiction of the Executive Secretary to coordinate oper- 
ations and to simplify hiring procedures. Acting upon the recommenda- 
tions of the Data Processing Committee, the town appropriated $12,000. 
to install data processing equipment. This equipment was installed 
during the fall and programs were developed for town and school payrolls, 
water billing, and appropriation accounts. Implementation of payroll 
entries will begin on January 1, 1975, water accounts in April, 1975, 
and appropriation accounts in July, 1975. The town also approved an 
article providing for a charter amendment to establish a new date for 
warrant hearings and related administrative requirements. The matter 
will be submitted to the voters at the next annual election for action. 
Funds were appropriated to air condition the town hall. A committee 
continued to study the need for a new police station and/or town hall. 
Town officials are now indemnified for action taken in connection with 
their work. Insurance was obtained for this purpose after it became 
available this year. 

FREDERICK C. CONLEY 

On December 7, 1974 we were saddened by the resignation of 
Frederick C. Conley as Executive Secretary, effective December 31, 1974. 

22 




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Mr. Conley left Medfield to accept an administrative post in Bernard's 
Township, New Jersey. As our first Executive Secretary he did much to 
improve town government and he served us well both as an administrator 
and as a person. We miss Fred but we wish him the very best in his new 
position. 

325th ANNIVERSARY 

With the approach of both the American Bicentennial and the 325th 
Anniversary of Medfield 1 s incorporation, 1974 saw a considerable revival 
of interest in the town's history. The American Bicentennial Commission 
designated Medfield as a bicentennial community. The Selectmen were 
notified by the Massachusetts Historical Commission that the First Parish 
Unitarian church had been placed on the National Register of Historic 
Places on April 18, 1974. Several residents suggested that application 
be made to place Baker's (Meeting House) Pond on the National Register 
which, if done, would make the pond eligible for matching restoration 
grants from the Department of the Interior. On July fourth the town was 
presented a Bicentennial flag in ceremonies attended by Congresswoman 
Margaret M. Heckler and Representative George R. Sprague. 

MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL TEAM 

In December the Medfield High School basketball team presented a 
town key and a Paul Revere bowl to officials of the island of Maui in 
Hawaii where they had travelled to participate in three basketball games. 
We are happy to report that they won all three games and are undefeated 
as of this writing. We are even happier to report that we have received 
very complimentary letters from the Maui officials concerning the 
excellent performance and conduct of our Team. 

CAPITAL PROJECTS 

It was a major year for capital construction projects. By the end 
of the year the new sewerage treatment plant was substantially completed 
with a targeted opening date of mid-February, 1975. Relocated Route 27 
was completed and dedicated on July 2 as North Meadows Road, a name 
selected to commemorate the early history of the town when that section 
of Medfield was known as North Meadows. In conjunction with the construc- 
tion of Route 27, West Street was reconstructed and flashing signals 
were installed at the intersection of the two roads. Sewer interceptors 
were also installed in the area at the time of construction to minimize 
installation costs. Utilizing state, county and federal funding, the 
town was able to undertake these major capital projects while maintaining 
a stable tax rate. To continue this advantageous method of financing, 
the town entered into an agreement with the Commonwealth for a 
T.O.P.I.C.S. study of traffic flow and safety. Upon completion of 
various planning and design studies the town would be eligible for 100% 
federal financing of traffic improvements on major arterials . 

LAND ACQUISITION 

The Town acquired a major tract of land for recreational use with 
the transfer of 56.35 acres of land from the Commonwealth of Massachu- 

24 



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setts, Department of Mental Health to the town of Medfield on May 27, 
1974. This land was conveyed subject to the restriction that it be 
utilized only for school, associated recreational, or similar municipal » 
purposes within five years or title reverts to the Commonwealth. 

At the 1974 Annual Town Meeting the Town unanimously authorized its 
most significant commitment to conservation in the history of the Town 
by voting to acquire 242.5 acres of land in the Noon Hill area authoriz- 
ing $1,130,450. for acquisition and development. Progress on the acqui- 
sition of Noon Hill continued with preparation of appraisal reports and 
submission of applications to the federal and state governments 'for 75% 
reimbursement. Land acquisitions will be made in 1975. 

FORMER POLICE OFFICER GUGLIOTTA 

We were saddened to learn that on February 19, 1974, former Police 
Officer Nicholas Gugliotta, one of the two original members of the 
department passed away. Officer Gugliotta had served on the police 
force for 24 years including a period as Acting Chief in 1958, before 
retiring on August 30, 1970. 

BY-LAWS 

At the Annual Town Meeting 1974, after much debate the town meeting 
approved a leash law and authorized the hiring of a full-time dog officer 
and an assistant to enforce its provisions. The Town also approved by- 
laws prohibiting public drinking and loitering at a Special Town Meeting 
in October 1974. 

ELECTIONS 

During the year the following elections were made to fill vacancies 
on the various boards and commissions. 

Genie T. Roberts - Park Commission 
John C. Rudisill,Jr. - School Committee 
David E. Hansen - School Committee 

AMBULANCE SERVICE 

A new ambulance was ordered for the Fire Department for delivery 
in 1975. The townpeople are fortunate in that several residents have 
completed training under the new emergency medical treatment Act and 
are thus able to render high quality emergency medical care in accor- 
dance with the requirements of this law. Those who have completed this 
rigorous 81-hour training course are to be commended for their dedica- 
tion. 

HOUSING 

Harry A. Kelleher for the Selectmen and Bruce Oravec for the 

Housing Authority signed an option on March 19, 1974 for the purchase of 
6.2 acres of land on Pound Street, the site selected for a new elderly 



26 




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housing project. Under terms of the option agreement, the acquisition 
cost would be $90,000. 

At year's end the Housing Authority and the Department of Community 
Affairs were resolving several issues prior to the start of construc- 
tion. 

We are happy to report that Wilkins Glen, a 102 unit low and mod- 
erate income complex, is well along in the construction phase and occu- 
pancy is expected in early Spring of 1975. Its completion will provide 
housing which is badly needed. 

STATE AND NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

At the national level the year was marked by the unprecedented 
resignations of the Vice President and the President and the swearing 
in of Gerald R. Ford as the 38th President of the United States. A 
double-digit rate of inflation for the past three years has caused many 
hardships and necessitated a 3% cost-of-living adjustment by action of 
the Fall Special Town Meeting for town employees not covered by labor 
contracts. Unfortunately along with this inflation, unemployment rose 
rapidly during 1974, reflecting a significant decline in the economy. 
Most economists attributed this unusual combination of inflation and 
recession to rising fuel prices and high interest rates. Whatever the 
cause, the impact on town budgets was substantial with major increases 
for utilities and fuel as well as significant increases in the cost of 
materials and equipment. It was particularly satisfying that in spite 
of these increases we were able to maintain our sound financial position 
with only a modest property tax increase. 

At the State level Michael A. Dukakis was elected governor in 
November and faced an estimated $350 million dollar budget deficit. 
Early in 1974 the Selectmen had written the former governor and the 
legislature, urging that comprehensive tax reform be the first priority 
of the state government. The present financial condition of the Common- 
wealth may necessitate a long overdue review of the state tax system. 
A new two year transportation bill provided state funding for both 
transit and highway construction and included state assumption of fifty 
percent of the M.B.T.A. budget deficit. 

To the many residents of Medfield who gave of their time to make 
our town a better place to live, we express our sincere thanks. Resi- 
dents wishing to volunteer their services for various town duties may 
contact the Selectmen's office for a form indicating their preferences 
for assignments. 

Respectfully submitted, 



HcUViy A. KoJULdkQA, Chairman 
Jo&zpk L. MaJLcioneJXe,, clerk 
fovtkusi L. Vcuutcut 
Board of Selectmen 



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THE SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS, WATER AND SEWER 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: 

The Annual Report of the several departments assigned to me is 
hereby respectfully submitted. 

LANDFILL . Mr. Melvin Thibeau, the Operator, resigned after five 
years of service to the Town as Operator. Mr. Thibeau contributed 
greatly to the success of the development of the Landfill from the 
old traditional Town Dump; his efforts and accomplishments are appre- 
ciated. 

It was with great difficulty that a new Operator was obtained 
because of the nature of the work and the days assigned for the opera- 
tion of the Landfill. Most communities are open only during weekdays 
and only a few on Saturdays. Because the residents of the Town maintain 
their properties in such excellent condition, it is felt that the 
Landfill Area should be open to them on Sundays as well as Saturdays. 

Under State Board of Health Regulations adopted in 1970, all Land- 
fill Areas must be approved by the State Board of Health. In 1973 the 
Town appropriated $6,500. for the purpose of meeting the State regula- 
tions for the disposal of solid wastes by sanitary landfill. Metcalf 
and Eddy, the Town's consultant, has made a study and report in 
accordance with State requirements which will protect the environment. 

In 1974 the Town appropriated $3,300. to implement the operational 
plan as contained in the Report and in the spring of 1975 will change 
the operational procedure at the Landfill site. 

In the fall of 1974, 685 feet of chain link fence was installed 
and in 1975 additional fence will have to be installed along the 
northerly side of the area in order to be in compliance with State 
requirements . 

The Metcalf and Eddy report estimates that the present 14 acres 
will have been exhausted for landfill purposes by mid 1977. Therefore, 
time is very short for processing the 32 acres that the Town purchased 
in 1970 if it wishes it to be ready for use upon the expiration of the 
present area. A sum of money has been included in the Landfill budget 
for this purpose. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT . The principal concern during the past year 
has been preparation for the opening of the new Sewer Treatment Plant 
off Bridge Street. Training for personnel has continued and experience 
gained from other plant operations. The Operators are very familiar 
with our own Plant in that most of their time has been spent at the 
new plant since September. 

30 



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WATER DEPARTMENT . The Water Department has continued its program 
of checking hydrants twice yearly so that they will be operative in the 
event they are needed for fire fighting. This year the hydrants were 
painted under the Neighborhood Youth Corps Program. 

The wells are checked daily, the water tested and various meters 
read and recorded. 

In addition to maintenance of the Town water system, this Depart- 
ment also maintains the existing street sewer system. 

Last year it was recommended that a program be instituted for 
replacing inside water meters with remote meters that can be read from 
the outside. Many towns are in various stages of conversion because in 
time the meters pay for themselves. Although funds were not appropriat- 
ed for a program, new services are provided with the new type of meter. 

The budget for 1974-1975 will run considerably over the amount 
appropriated and the 1975-1976 budget will be substantially higher, 
primarily because of power costs. 

STREET DEPARTMENT . As planned three years ago when the West 
Street project was undertaken, it was completed on schedule in 1974. 
Good management of a street consists of a minimum maintenance which 
consists only of sweeping it, cleaning the catch basins and plowing it. 
West Street is an example of a street that will require practically no 
time or expense for at least 30 years. The time wasted in the past on 
a street such as West Street can be invested in other improvements. 

In consistency with past policy of the Selectmen, a tree replace- 
ment policy was completed under the direction of the Tree Warden so 
that West Street will be a pretty street as well as a practical one. 

The assistance of the Norfolk County Engineer is acknowledged 
and appreciated. 

The Street Department cooperated with the Police Department in 
the installation of flashing lights at the intersection of West Street 
and North Meadows Road. 

As directed by the Selectmen, the high bank at the intersection of 
West Street and North Meadows Road will be lowered to improve site 
visibility at the intersection. 

The costs of West and Bridge Streets are as follows: 

State County Town Total 

1972 Ch. 90 $11,200. $5,600. $5,600. $22,400. 

1973 Ch. 765 (Acts of 1972) 27,976. 6,050. 6,050. 40,076. 

1974 Ch. 765 (Acts of 1972) 24,000. 6,050. ) 

Ch. 1140 (Acts of 1973) 55,952. )__!_' 

$148,478. 
32 



The Town spent $11,650. for the above work, much of which was 

necessary for the construction of sewer interceptor. In addition to 

the cost, the Town received the additional benefit of acquiring valuable 
gravel and fill. 

State Aid for highways changed radically in 1973. Chapter 90 and 
Chapter 81 programs that were instituted in 1918 have terminated forever 
A reliable ongoing program has not replaced the old program. 

State Aid for Highways since 1973 (Ch. 1140) has been made part of 
the Transit Package. Amounts have been appropriated within the M.B.T.A. 
District for the reduction of the M.B.T.A. deficit and a similar amount 
appropriated outside the M.B.T.A. for highway purposes. 

Since Medfield receives its benefits from funds assigned for 
M.B.T.A. purposes it would have received nothing for highways as the 
bill was originally submitted. The Nickinello amendment supported 
actively by our own Representative assured a 2.5 million distribution 
for highway purposes for those towns within the M.B.T.A. district that 
received no M.B.T.A. service. 

Under the latest Transit Package, Ch. 825 of the Acts of 1974, the 
Town will have available for use in Calendar 1975, $27,976. and $27,976. 
for use in Calendar 1976. Under Ch. 765, Acts of 1972, the Town will 
have available $27,976. in 1975 and $27,976. in 1976. Future transit 
packages and bond issues will make additional funds available for high- 
way purposes. 

EQUIPMENT . There is a long time delay in the delivery of new equip- 
ment. In the spring of 1974 two trucks were ordered to replace trucks 
in very poor condition. Delivery has not been made and will not be for 
several months yet. Therefore, it is necessary to be very careful in 
the use of the trucks that will be traded in order to keep them in 
service until the new ones arrive. 

EQUIPMENT REPAIRS . Because the Town now has a Town Garage with 
repair facilities, the Selectmen have expressed an interest in using 
the facility for maintaining and repairing other Town vehicles. The 
Street Department is now in a position to carry out such a program at 
no cost to the Town until June 30, 1975 because of the acquisition of 
a competent mechanic through the Emergency Employment Act. 

FREDERICK CONLEY . During the course of the four years that Mr. 
Conley served as the Town's first Executive Secretary, every town 
employee developed a respect and admiration for Mr. Conley. 

Mr. Conley became as competent in the matters that concerned these 

several departments as he did in the many other areas of Town Govern- 
ment. Among the many varied matters which he understood was people. 

The best wishes of all follow Mr. Conley to New Jersey and where- 
ever else he may work. 

Although problems increase in scope and number, working with the 

33 



dedicated men and women who serve the Town makes them easier. 

It is a pleasure to work under the dedicated leadership of the 
Selectmen and the many Boards and Commissions that serve the Town and 
with the people of Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WilX-Lam E. McCarthy, 

Super intendant 

STREETS, WATER AND SEWER 



THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my fifth annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1974. 

Again, this year our records show a marked increase in service. 

I would like to take this opportunity to remind homeowners of the 
importance of keeping home appliances in good working condition, 
especially the need to vacuum thoroughly behind dryers. 

I would also like to remind all residents who have the 359 exchange 
that the number to call for any emergency is 911. Those residents who 
may have a 668 exchange must call the 359-4411 number to report a fire. 

Firefighters Philip Pember, James Tubridy, Henry Marcel, and 
Edward Carreiro have completed training in Emergency Medical Techniques. 
During the year two new men were added to the departments roster. They 
were Thomas LaPlante and Henry Marcel. 

During the year fire drills were held in all schools and the 
nursing home. During fire prevention week tours were conducted at 
the station for the children. For those who could not come to the 
station, a piece of apparatus was taken to the schools for demonstra- 
tions. 

The department's apparatus is in satisfactory condition, but I 
feel that the 1941 Ford Pumper should be replaced next year. I will 
be asking for funds to do this at the town meeting. 

The new town garage was added to our fire alarm system this year. 
I would like to thank the Medfield Jaycees for their donation 

34 



towards the purchase of a motor for our rescue boat. 

I would like to extend my sincere thanks for the cooperation of 
the officers and men of the department, members of the Police Depart- 
ment, Secretaries in the Town Office, building and gas inspectors and 
all other Town Departments. I would particularly like to express 
appreciation in behalf of the townspeople to Frederick Rogers, Jr. who 
has been a volunteer dispatcher in the Fire Station daily during the 
past three years. 

Respectfully submitted, 



JoA&pk E. Ryan, 
Fire Chief 

SERVICES RENDERED IN 1974 



Buildings 

Brush & Grass 

State Hospital 

Automobiles & Trucks 

Outdoor Burning Permits 

Rubbish 

Gasoline Washdowns 

Highway Accidents 

Electrical 

Oil Storage Permits 

Inspections 

Propane Gas Permits 

Model Rocket Permits 

Investigations 

Oil or Gas Burners 

Mutual Aid 

Outside Assistance 

Lock Outs 

Bomb Scares 

Pumping Cellars 

Box Alarms 

Still Alarms 

False Alarms 

Explosive Permits 

Station Duty 

Dump 

Blasting Permits 

Outdoor Cooking Permits 

Televisions 

Rescues 

Ovens 

Chimneys 

Details 

Duplicating Fluid Permits 



10 

60 

5 

17 

125 

6 

6 

10 

16 

39 

132 

3 

9 

46 

5 

15 

10 

5 

9 

5 

132 

180 

28 

1 

14 

3 

19 

12 

2 

8 

6 

5 

7 

5 



35 



THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit the Annual Report of the Medfield Police Depart- 
ment for the year ending December 31, 1974. 

Accidents Reported 244 

Personal Injuries 50 

Fatalities 3 

Ambulance Trips 234 

Arrests 72 

Assaults 6 

Arson 3 
Assistance: 

Other Departments 215 

Motorists 232 

General 331 
Automobiles: 

Reported Stolen 11 

Stolen MV Recovered 10 

Citations Issued 575 

Bomb Scares 10 

Breaking and Enterings 68 

Attempted Breaking and Enterings 23 

Burglar Alarms Answered 348 

Civil Matters and Family Problems 47 

Closed Homes Checked 496 

Court Attendance 248 

Disturbances 23 

Doors Found Unlocked or Open 105 

Windows Found Unlocked" or Open 28 

Emergency Calls 201 

Fires Responded to by Police 77 

Funeral Escorts 29 

Indecent Exposures 8 

Investigation for Miscellaneous Complaints 1575 

Investigations With Other Departments 23 

Larceny: 226 

Under $50.00 97 

Over $50.00 76 

Bicycles 42 

Motor Vehicles 11 

Attempted Larceny 8 

Lost Children Reported 22 

Lost Children Located by Police 9 

Malicious Destruction to Property 250 

Missing Patients Reported 72 

Returned by Police 60 



36 



Missing Persons Reported 21 

Located by Police 4 

Messages Delivered 64 
Permits Issued: 

Gunsmith 1 

Ammunition Dealer 2 

Dealer License 1 

Firearms Identification Cards 90 

Pistol Permits 101 

Bicycles Registered 288 

Property Reported Lost 57 

Lost Property Turned into Police 93 

Prowlers 53 

Rape 1 

Attempted Rape 1 

Summons Served 203 

Suspicious: 

Motor Vehicles 143 

Persons 116 

Phone Calls Reported 47 

False Alarms Investigated 11 

Stolen Property Recovered 36 

Drunks Under Protective Custody , 27 

Sudden Deaths Investigated 6 

During 1974 we had more complaints of vandalism, loitering, and 
littering. We had a great deal of trouble with thefts from the High 
School. The two major concerns I have are additional manpower, and a 
new police station. 

July 1st we began a .cooperative program with Northeastern Univer- 
sity by hiring two police interns. They primarily were dispatchers, 
allowing an officer to perform other functions, such as foot patrol, 
investigations, attend seminars, etc. Because they are not allowed 
full police powers it did not give us enough flexibility, whereas if 
we appointed police officers, they would be trained to perform all 
police duties and remain here to perform any duties required instead. 

Kevin Robinson of Sharon was appointed a permanent police officer 
in April. We still have three permanent vacancies, but we appointed 
nine permanent intermittents from which we can fill the vacant positions, 
Because of the increase of complaints during the summer months, we 
should put two additional officers on during that period to curb some 
of the vandalism and littering, etc. 

As each year passes and we receive more complaints generally and 
have a wider variety of crime, we find it much harder to function 
properly with the inadequate facilities we have at the Town Hall. I 
urge the Board of Selectmen to make a new police station the number one 
priority this year. 

I also want to add a cruiser to patrol duty. We cannot effectively 
patrol the entire town with two cars patrolling, particularly during 
the summer months. 

37 



Traffic was eased in the square in the morning with the opening 
of North Meadows Road, but we still have a problem in the evening be- 
cause of the traffic lights at Main and Spring Streets and at the rail- 
road tracks. I am attempting to have the cycles changed. We also had 
severe problems at North Meadows and West Streets until we were able 
to get flashing lights installed. From July 1st, when North Meadows 
Road opened to November 9, when the lights were installed, we had 12 
accidents, 2 of them fatal. Since that time we have had one accident. 

In general our number of accidents reduced, although we had 3 
fatals. We purchased a new radar unit to enable us to give more enforce- 
ment on the streets. 

Our vandalism complaints increased and more of the officers' time 
during afternoon and evening hours were spent answering complaints of 
loitering, littering, and drinking. Hopefully the town by-laws adopted 
at the October town meeting will help reduce the time we must spend on 
these nuisance type complaints. 

I wish to express appreciation for the assistance received through- 
out the year from all town departments, the traffic supervisors, the 
auxiliary police, the selectmen's staff, and town hall secretaries. 

Respectfully submitted, 



WZLliam H. Mann, 
Chief of Police 



AMBULANCE DEPARTMENT 

We hereby submit the Annual Report of the Operation and maintenance 
of the Town of Medfield Ambulance Service for the year ending December 
31, 1974: 

Ambulance trips made in 1974 243 

Budget expenditures in 1974 $3,163.20 

Insurance Coverage 97.05 

Total amount billed in 1974 5,705.00 

Outstanding bills for 1974 2,280.00 

Outstanding bills for 1973 310.00 

Total outstanding bills $2,590.00 

Respectfully submitted, 



UaJlAy A. K&ll&kzA, Chairman 
JoA&pk L. Ma/icion&tte., clerk 
A/vthu/i L. VaflJia/i 
Board of Selectmen 



38 



THE CIVIL DEFENSE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Department being established and required by law for the 
coordinating of services for the protection of the community and its 
members in the event of war, natural and man made disasters has had a 
busy year without these occurrences. This year as in past years, this 
Department has provided services to supplement the other Town Depart- 
ments and provide help and protection for the community that it would 
not otherwise have had. 

The Auxiliary Police, under the direction of Deputy CD Director 
John Varnum, Jr. and with the cooperation of Police Chief William Mann, 
have done much by way of augmenting the regular Police Department with 
extra patrols and manpower. This -additional help has provided addition- 
al surveillance of vacant homes, traffic control and pedestrian safety, 
protection for public buildings and the like. 

The members of the Rescue Squad have put in many hours maintaining 
and operating the Rescue Truck in conjunction with the Fire Department 
and Ambulance operations under the direction of Fire Chief Joseph Ryan. 

Six of the members of the Civil Defense Department have taken the 
81 hour Emergency Medical Technician- Ambulance training and at this 
time have faken the National Registry Examination for EMT-As. Scores 
have not yet been received, but I'm sure that they all did well. This 
training is providing the community with one of the finest resources of 
emergency medical response and basic life support available anywhere. 

The members of the Department are to be commended for their many 
hours of volunteer work, purchasing their own uniforms and providing 
much of the equipment which is necessary in the performance of the 
services they provide without pay. 

The surplus property program continues to provide supplies and 
equipment at real savings to all Town Departments. The pickings have 
not been as great this year as the promised return of military equip- 
ment did not occur. 

Many thanks to the Selectmen, Finance Committee, Police, Fire and 
Highway Departments for their continued cooperation and support. 

Respectfully submitted, 



AuAtsLn C. Buchanan, 
Director 



39 





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THE WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 





1973 


1974 


1975 




Actual 


Actual 


Estimate 


Total Services 


2,340 


2,385 


2,425 


Added Customers 


45 


40 


45 


Thousand Gallons 








Pumped 


281,117 


308,482 


340,000 



Thousand Gallons Sold 186,715 203,328 220,000 

Water Sold $112,073. $122,046. $132,000. 

Expenses $ 57,742. $ 81,521. $ 99,201. 

Debt Services: 

Smith Station & Wells $ 33,675. $ 32,675. $ 31,575. 

Construction of the new Sewer Plant, scheduled for completion 
late in 1974, was delayed as the supplier of major equipment failed 
to make delivery on time. It will be fully operational early in 1975. 
This will complete the "Initial Construction Program." Planning is 
underway for the "Continuing Program" which will eventually result in 
sewering of most of the town. 

The extension of the water main in Forest Street, connecting it 
to the existing main in Granite Street, was completed. 

A test well. was drilled in the Mine Brook area. Test for flow 
and quality were successful and accepted by the State. Plans for the 
permanent well and pumping station are completed. The added capacity 
of this well will be available in late 1975. These steps will help 
to alleviate the conditions which led to the water ban last summer 
and to the low pressure in some sections, particularly in the southern 
areas of the town. 

Further work, primarily involving extension of adequate mains . 
and providing storage capacity in the southern part df the town, will 
be needed to assure an adequate water supply to all of the town. We 
are proceeding with plans to meet this objective. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Water & Sewerage Board 



Alien F. Holmes, Chairman 
John V. itiiJLLiam£> , clerk 
CkaAlte F. Cotton 

Associate Member 
VonaZd W. BlalM 



41 



THE PLANNING BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Medfield Planning Board hereby submits its Annual Report for 
the year ending December 31, 1974. 

GUIDING THE TOWN'S RESIDENTIAL GROWTH 

The Planning Board, after following the procedure as set out in 
Chapter 41 of the General Laws - Municipal Planning and Subdivision 
Control legislation, approved two definitive plans totalling 24 lots 
under the subdivision Control Law. The Board released 43 lots for 
building in subdivisions and signed 14 plans that did not come under 
the Subdivision Control Law, one plan comprising 22 lots. 

A table is included indicating subdivision lots approved for 
building, number of lots released during the year for building, and 
the number of lots remaining in each subdivision to be built. The 
table runs from 1956 to date. 

(SEE SEPARATE SHEET FOR TABLE) 

CONTINUED UPDATING OF THE MASTER PLAN 

The "Land Use and Land Utilization Study" and "Recreation and 
Conservation in Medfield - An Open Space Plan" authorized by the Town 
Meeting of 1973 were completed. A "Commercial and Industrial Impact 
Study, Elan and Program for the Town of Medfield" is now underway. 
These projects have been conducted by the Board in conjunction with the 
Master Plan Implementation Committee and Metcalf & Eddy, consultants, 
as well as other Town Boards. 

OTHER ACTIVITIES 

Members of the Board have attended various meetings with other 
Town Boards and also attended meetings of the MAPC, Massachusetts 
Federation of Planning Boards and the New England Law Institute. 

The opportunity for developers to plan subdivisions to complement 
the contours of their land was added to Medfield' s Zoning Bylaw; namely, 
Open Area Zoning. 

Another step ahead for the Town was the result of the 1974 Town 
Meeting wherein funds were voted to allow the use of an engineering 
consultant to review preliminary and definitive subdivision plans, 
inspect subdivision construction to estimate surety for completion of 
streets and sidewalks and other engineering and consulting services 
as required. 

A change in Medfield f s Land Subdivision Rules and Regulations was 

42 



incorporated which requires developers of new subdivisions to pay a fee 
for preliminary and definitive plan review and for setting arid reducing 
surety. The Board anticipates that eventually this revenue will com- 
pletely cover the cost of our engineering consultant. 

The Board has been actively engaged in trying to prevent a change 
in the Zoning Enabling Act by the State Legislature which will allow 
one person, instead of the Board of Appeals, to grant special permits 
and variances. 

The Planning Board recommended and the Town voted to accept Erik 
Road, Partridge Road and Camelot Lane as public ways in 1974. 

GENERAL 

The Board acknowledges the cooperation and assistance of other 
town boards and departments, with special mention of the Master Plan 
Implementation Committee for its unflagging work. 

All regular Planning Board meetings are open to the public. 
Requests for information may be obtained from the Planning Board 
Assistant, Mrs. John C. Willis, at either 359-8505 or 359-2726. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Bu/igQJ>4 P. StcLYidlty, Chairman 
Sa.Yidn.CL G. Mun4e//, Vice Chairman 
VonaZd J. MacVonaZd, Secretary 
KmvKith M. CkildA, 3k.. 
C. RlckaAd McCulZougk 
Medfield Planning Board 



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46 



THE MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Continuation of the Recreation and Conservation Study and Plan 
began early in 1974 with a series of neighborhood coffees and an open 
forum. Assistance and information was provided, with appreciation, by 
Metcalf and Eddy Inc., the League of Women Voters, Park and Recreation 
Commission and Conservation Commission. A questionnaire was then formu- 
lated and distributed to every household in town, with 26% responding. 
Results and comments were incorporated in the report, completed and 
distributed to town departments and officials in November. 

Annual Town Meeting, 1974, took the following actions on recommen- 
dations in the Master Plan: 

1. Unanimous approval for Conservation Commission to purchase 250 
plus acres in the Noon Hill area. 

2. Approval for Park and Recreation Commission to have a study 
made and plan prepared for all recreational facilities, includ- 
ing site feasibility for a swimming facility. 

3. Approval for construction of a permanent well and pumping 
station and connection to the present water system. 

4. Approval for closing the loop in the water main between Forest 
and Granite Streets. 

5. Approval to amend the Zoning By-law to include Open Area 
Residential Development regulations. 

6. Approval to convert Town Hall Yard to a municipal parking area. 

Continuing the phased up-dating of the Master Plan, a Commercial 
and Industrial Impact Study, Plan and Program was voted at Annual Town 
Meeting. MPIC will act as the coordinating body for all town depart- 
ments and groups involved in this endeavor. 

During the year, installation of the new sewer system continued 
and the new Route 27, named North Meadows Road, was completed and opened 
for traffic. Acting on the recommendation of the Recreation Report, 
Park and Recreation Commission asked particular town boards to appoint 
representatives to serve on an advisory committee to assist Park and 
Recreation with planning and public relations. 



47 



In June, 1974, the terms of office of Grace Ritchie, Joseph 
Donnelly and Richard Kaewer expired. Their combined total of over 
25 years of service to MPIC is sincerely appreciated. 

Repsectfully submitted, 



kite. Ricka/id C. kU.nzAi.ngQA, Chairman 
Mi. UaAd C. Smuth, Vice-Chairman 
M/L6. bJUlsLam W. BayicAo£t 
Ak. RobzAt M. Finn 
Wl. Hanson C. Robbing 
Wi. StanZzy C. Ro&£<LeA 
WiA. Hilton P. Skaw 
WiA . devoid T. ToJnpZe, 



THE BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and 
Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

The Board of Appeals on Zoning submits herewith the report for the 
year ending December 31, 1974. 

The Board was organized as follows: 

James T. Regan, Chairman 

Ralph C. Copeland, Clerk 

James 0. Aronson 

William P. Spang, Associate 

Mrs. Mildred E. Willis, Secretary 

During the year twenty hearings were held and, in summary, the 
decisions were as follows: 

2 Comprehensive permits for construction of apartments. Granted. 

1 Variance of frontage requirement. Granted. 

1 Special permit for addition to an existing building. Granted. 

1 Variance from parking requirements. Granted. 

2 Special permits for home occupation. Granted. 

1 Special permit for accessory building. Denied. 

2 Variances for real estate office in residential area. Denied. 



48 



1 Special permit to alter existing dwelling. Waived and moot. 

1 Variance for parking lot. Granted. 

1 Variance for tennis courts in I-E District. Denied. 

1 Variance to construct 250 foot communications tower. Denied. 

1 Special permit to allow construction in the flood plain. Granted. 

1 Special permit for home occupation. Denied. 

1 Special permit to convert existing dwelling to multifamily. 
Granted. 

1 Variance from lot line requirements. Withdrawn. 

2 Variances from lot line requirements. Granted. 

1 Special permit to construct second dwelling on single lot. 
Granted. 

In each case the decision of the Board of Appeals was unanimous. 

Respectfully submitted, 



3(W\QJ> T. R&gan, Chairman 
Board of Appeals on Zoning 



49 



THE TRUSTEES OF THE MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Trustees of the Memorial Public Library submit their annual 
report for the calendar year 1974. 

The Board met twelve times last year in an attempt to maintain 
and improve the services and facilities of the public library. Much 
has been achieved the past few years in the area of maintenance. The 
following improvements have been made in 1974: relighting of the 
Dailey Room, replanting trees and landscaping in front of the library, 
and resetting of the railings to assure safety on the front steps. 

The relighting of the adult reading room commenced late last year 
and was concluded toward the middle of 1974. At present, the Board 
has drafted specifications for new gutters on all four corners of the 
building. After reviewing many alternative solutions to this recurring 
problem, the Board agreed that this was the most efficient solution. 

The Trustees acknowledge, with regret, the resignation of Mrs. 
Frances Copithorne after twenty years of service as Children's Librarian. 
The Trustees appreciated her years of service in making the lives of 
children brighter and happier. The Board appointed Ms. Connie Jones 
as her successor and wish her success in the years ahead. 

The Trustees were fortunate again this year to have a small group 
of townspeople headed by Mrs. Frederick Temple sponsor a Book Fair for 
the public library. The fair netted $195.00. This money plus funds 
from last year's book fair will enable the Trustees to resurface the 
tables in the adult reading room. This project will make the reading 
room a more pleasant and attractive facility for use of the towns- 
people. 

The Special Town Meeting in October approved a study committee 
to review the needs of the public library. The Board has noted in 
previous reports that our facilities are inadequate to serve the 
varied and growing needs of the town. Our circulation has been rapidly 
increasing, and within a year we will have reached our total capacity 
for books. The Trustees hope that an outside committee will carefully 
review our plight and provide an objective appraisal of our needs. The 



50 



Board hopes that this initial step will eventually result in a library 
that will adequately serve our community in the foreseeable future. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Jam&> F. BaAton, Chairman 
KmneJth G. F&ttig, Vice Chairman 
Jane, P. Guth/iLZ, Secretary 
Lau/ia H. Smith 
Ma/iy M. Hay 
Vavld L. W-iima/itk 



THE MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report as Head Librarian for the year ending 
December 31, 1974. 



STATISTICS 



Circulation Figures 



Adult Department 43,974 

Children's Room 18,446 

Interlibrary Loan 428 

Total circulation 62,848 

New Books Purchased 947 

Volumes Owned as of December 31, 1974 19,094 

Circulation figures show an increase of approximately 7% in the 
adult department over 1973, while there was a slight decrease in the 
number of books taken out from the children's room. 

During the year a step towards modernization was taken with the 
installation of two charge-out machines which provide a more efficient 
and accurate method for checking out books. The new system replaces 
the old method of signatures on book cards. From March through 
December 1974, there were 3,390 Medfield residents who registered for 
a library card to be used with the new machines and 52 non-residents. 

A change in personnel occurred in the children's room with the 
retirement on December first of Mrs. Frances Copithorne who served the 
town faithfully for twenty years. The Library Trustees appointed Connie 
S. Jones of Medfield as the new Children's Librarian. She is a graduate 

of Franimgham State College and has both teaching and library experience' 
Her knowledge, creativity and warmth is sure to attract young people of 

51 



all ages to the library. 

Several changes and additions have been made in the children's 
room during the year. As an experiment, it was decided to have one 
preschool story hour session held in the morning, while the other group 
continued to meet in the afternoon. This change has met with enthusias- 
tic approval from parents whose children are enrolled in an afternoon 
kindergarten or nursery school group. Another change which brightens 
the Children's Room considerably is the carpeting which has been laid 
in the area where Story Hour is held. Other additions include a small 
but growing collection of paper-back books and also tape cassetts of 
popular children's stories which may be taken home. Upstairs, there is 
also a collection of tape cassettes which primarily duplicate the most 
popular records. 

It should be noted in closing that the library building is rapidly 
approaching full capacity and little shelf space exists to accommodate 
new books added to the collection each year. Hopefully, the newly 
appointed study committee on library needs will be able to report at 
the annual Town Meeting its initial recommendations for relieving the 
crowded conditions. 

The cooperation and support of the Library Trustees and staff 
during the past year is greatly appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Jane. 8. A/ickeA, 
Head Librarian 

STAFF 

Jane Archer , Head Librarian 
Barbara Friend, Assistant Librarian 
Connie Jones, Children's Librarian 
Constance Yena, Senior Aide 
Frances Copithorne, Senior Aide 

REGULAR AIDES 

Ruth Justice Deborah Kalweit 

Marilyn Erickson Nadine Flagg 

Elizabeth Downey Judith Bell 

CUSTODIAN 

Vincent Bravo 



52 



THE HOUSING AUTHORITY 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

and Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

The Authority notes the departure of Herbert B. Burr, Sr. from the 
Authority and wishes to express its gratitude for his many years of fine 
service, both as a member and as a chairman. 

At the beginning of 1974, the Housing Authority was faced with the 
refusal of the Department of Community Affairs to approve its final 
application for the remaining funds necessary to construct the Pound 
Street Housing for the Elderly. With the able assistance of the Executive 
Secretary, Mr. Fred Conley, the Medfield Selectmen, and Representative 
George R. Sprague, a solution was reached whereby the size of the project 
was increased to 60 units, and the land area increased to slightly in 
excess of six acres. This increase in the number of units resulted in 
a lower cost per unit and therefore allowed the Authority to obtain the 
preliminary approval of the Department of Community Affairs. 

The Authority subsequently received a Comprehensive Permit from the 
Board of Appeals to undertake the construction of the project, and early 
this Fall, the Authority completed the pruchase of the site property 
from Mrs. Blanche M. Kingsbury. 

The Authority directed its architects, Robert Charles Associates, 
Inc. , of Boston to prepare a revised site plan and application for fund- 
ing. Both the site plan and the application for funding have now been 
approved by the Department of Community Affairs, and as of this date 
the architect is preparing working drawings which are the basis of the 
bidding process, and which we estimate will be completed by the first of 
March. Immediately thereafter, the Authority will advertise for bids 
by general and sub-contractors. It is the earnest hope of the Authority 
that the project will be completed by the Spring of 1976. 

During the year, the Authority has supported and cooperated with 
McNeil & Associates, Inc. , with respect to its development of Wilkins 
Glen. The Authority has committed itself to no less than 25% of the 
Wilkins Glen units for housing for the elderly. 

The Authority has been designated by the Selectmen to act as a 
tenant selection committee for the entire Wilkins Glen complex, as it 
must of course for the units that it leases as well as the Pound Street 
Housing for the Elderly. 

To that end, the Authority, in ccoperation with McNeil Associates 
will be sending preliminary application forms to all individuals 
interested in each project. The Authority urges any individuals interes- 
ted in the two projects to contact any member of the Authority, 



53 



or the secretary of the Authority at the Town Hall, Mrs. Conners. 

Respectfully submitted, 

&Vlu.C£ J. Ofiav&c, Chairman 
hiLchcKll TammeAO, Vice-Chairman 
Cha/itzA Sloan, Treasurer 
RlckaAd PaUon, Assistant Treasurer 
tfazeZ R. Fsiank, Secretary 




Photo by Frank Simonetti, Jr. 

Selectmen and Conservation Commission sign historic Joint Management Agreemen 
with Trustees of Reservations for development of Noon Hill Reservation. 



54 



THE CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The year 1974 has been a busy one for the Conservation Commission. 
The acquisition of approximately 258 acres on Noon Hill was approved 
unanimously at town meeting in April. Upon completion of that under- 
taking, the Conservation Commission will have under its auspices a 
total of 538 acres. The Commission held four hearings under Massachu- 
setts Wetlands Protection Act, details of which appear below. We also 
participated in the Conservation-Recreation update of Master Plan by 
Metcalf & Eddy, who have produced a definitive Open Space Plan contain- 
ing all the goals and objectives of the Conservation Commission to be 
achieved in future years. 

The decision to attempt to acquire land in the Noon Hill area 
occurred with your endorsement in late 1973. The commission met almost 
weekly throughout the winter together with Metcalf & Eddy representatives 
to prepare for town meeting. Landowners were contacted to access their 
willingness to sell. Citizens were contacted at a series of coffees 
and via a questionnaire to access their opinion of town ownership of 
Noon Hill (most favored it). Metcalf & Eddy prepared an economic 
analysis showing that purchase with state and federal aid would have a 
lower impact on the tax rate than development for residential purposes. 

Furthermore, soil type and geologic structure of the area makes the 
land less than ideal for development, according to experts. State plan- 
ners had also earmarked Noon Hill as an open space area in their 
regional plan. The Commission presented the proposal to the Warrant 
Committee in April and won their endorsement. 

The proposal involving close to $1 million in real estate, having 
passed its major hurdle, Town Meeting, is now mired in bureaucratic red 
tape. An incredible amount of forms had to be filled out and complex 
procedures followed in order to qualify for state and federal reim- 
bursement. Our thanks go to Mr. Fred Conley for assistance on these 
matters. At this writing, all required documents are in the hands of 
Massachusetts Department of Natural Resources and it is hoped that 
the Commission may get clearance to pass papers in early 1975. 

The Commission held four Wetland hearings during the year as 
follows: 

Town of Medfield Sewer Extension : Approved with condition that 
temporary roads be removed after installation. 

Medfield Industrial Park : Proposal by Mr. Arnold Tofias to beautify 
section along Vine Brook for a picnic area approved. 



55 



Wilkins Glen Associates : Permission granted to fill .67 acres of 
wetlands in connection with 102 unit elderly housing project, with 
condition that proper drainage be provided under the access road 
which will be placed upon the filled area. 

Marvin Industrial Park : Cease and desist order, and an order of 
denial issued on the grounds that developer had no plans other than 
to fill wetlands which also happen to be zoned as flood plain for 
purposes of land speculation. Appealed by applicant, case still 
pending. 

The last case above, is an example of a major concern of the 
Conservation Commission. Despite the passage of strict laws, in 1972, 
with enforcing rules and regulations, the unauthorized filling and 
draining of wetlands continues. Besides the case described above, 
unauthorized filling or dredging occurred in the last year at Turtle 
Brook, Morse Road and Atlantic Brick land. We like to think that viola- 
tions occur because of ignorance of the law, but have a hunch that the 
root of the problem is much deeper than that. Our elected representa- 
tives passed the Wetland' s Act in response to public demand for protec- 
tion of the environment. Conservation Commissions throughout the 
Commonwealth were charged with the legal responsibility to uphold the 
law. Despite our legal responsibilities and our own convictions about 
the importance of preserving open land within our environment, we see 
neither the Wetland' s Act nor actions of our society leading to such 
preservation whenever there is a conflict between economic gain and 
ecologic gain. 

The Marvin Industrial Park is a case in point. About one half 
of that property lies in land zoned as flood-plain. In other words, 
by approval of such zoning, we as citizens have decreed that there shall 
be no building in that zone because river floods would occasionally 
inundate any structure placed there causing property damage, possible 
health hazard and expense to the community. Furthermore, preservation 
of this flood plain will help avoid floods in Needham, Dedham, Wellesley 
and Watertown. On the other hand, the town derives a high 97% of its 
taxes from residential real estate which prompted you to organize an 
Industrial Development Commission to attract industry to the town, and 
in particular to Marvin Industrial Park, for the sake of tax relief. 
It is for this reason you endorsed the new Route 27 extension which 
itself cut across flood plain. Do you, as elected leaders, understand 
the basic conflicts inherent in these policies? We believe that com- 
promise is possible. By setting aside some of the land to act as a 
sponge in time of flood, any real property that is built there would 
not suffer damage. The "cost" of finding a compromise and avoiding the 
possibility of future disaster would be borne both by the owners of the 
property in the form of less than maximum profits and by the town in the 
form of less than maximum potential taxes. We pray that all aspects of 
the problem will be debated objectively in the future, that a reasonable 
solution can be found. 

In November 1974, the State Department of Natural Resources publish- 
ed new stricter rules and regulations concerning the Wetlands Act. One 



56 



important revision is that any project occuring within 100 feet of the 
bank of a wetland area must receive prior clearance from the Conserva- 
tion Commission. Any citizen who is planning a project near a wetland 
is urged to contact the Commission directly, to learn of his obligations 
under the law. Furthermore, any citizen who observes unauthorized 
construction or filling operations on or near a wetlands is urged to 
report it to your Commission so that appropriate action can be taken. 

Another concern for the future is management of conservation lands 
held by the town and other agencies. Indeed, part of the bargain for 
obtaining close to $750,000. in State and Federal aid to buy Noon Hill 
land is an agreement to manage the property for the benefit of all 
owners. Already, cases of irresponsible usage of open land have been 
reported to us. A group started a log cabin on private land on Noon 
Hill cutting trees indiscriminately, and unauthorized camping occurs 
frequently at Holt's Pond. Last spring we were given an excellent 
presentation by Mr. Robert Bryant, a recent graduate of the University 
of Massachusetts School of Forestry, showing the potential benefits to 
the town of hiring a natural resources land manager. We do not intend 
to bring this subject up before town meeting until such time that a 
full time position would be justified and the means of financing it 
have been closely calculated. Meanwhile, Mr. Bryant has joined the 
Commission as an associate member. 

The Conservation Commission's future acquisition goals have been 
articulated in a complete Open Space Plan published by Metcalf & Eddy 
in late 1974 as part of its Master Plan update. The basis of the plan 
was a comparison of land usage today to that of ten years ago, and 
appears in the table below adjusted for the pending acquisition of land 
on Noon Hill. 



Change in Land Use Patterns: 1963-1973 
Measured in Acres 1963 % 1973 % 



Change 



Residential Land 

Industrial-Commercial 

Highways & Streets 

State & Town Owned & 
Developed with Buildings 
& Structures 

Land Committed for Develop- 
ment (mainly subdivisions) 

Other developed semi-public 
land (R&R & utility lines) 

Total developed land 3 

Total Open Space 6 

State & town owned undevel. 
land plus devel. outdoor 
recreation land 

Semi- pub lie open land 



.,299 


14.1 


1 


,781 


19.3 


+482 


119 


1.3 




69 


0.7 


- 50 


320 


3.5 




392 


4.2 


+ 72 


395(e) 


4.3 




503 


5.4 


+ 108 


930 


10.1 




226 


2.4 


-704 


128(e) 


1.4 




128 


1.4 





1,191 


34.6 


3 


,099 


33.6 


- 92 


>,044 


65.4 


6 


,136 


66.4 


+ 92 


356(e) 


3.9 




933 


10.1 


+577 


554(e) 


6.0 


1 


,214 


13.1 


+660 



57 



Measured in Acres 1963 % 1973 % Change 

Privately-owned wetlands 

& floodplain 1,690 18.3 1,228 13.3 -462 

Privately owned 

"developable" land 

(including farmland) 3,444 37.3 2,761 29.9 -683 
Total town acreage 9,235 100.0 9,235 100.0 

(e)=Estimate The 1964 study did not break down land use into these 

categories. 

Source: Metcalf & Eddy land use study 1974 and 1964, adjusted for 

noon Hill purchase of 1974 and 56 acres acquired from 

Department of Mental Health. 

Actual "developed" land declined by 92 acres, according to this 
table, which would indicate that most "new" residential property was 
already committed for development in 1963. The table shows that the 
town has made considerable progress over the ten year period in placing 
land out of reach of possible development. The possibilities for 
residential growth remain significant however. Approximately 30% of 
the town still falls into the category "pr ova tely- owned 'developable' 
land" and the Planning Board reported that 313 lots were still pending 
in sub-divisions in 1973. 

The major goal of the Conservation Commission is to act in co- 
ordination with you and the other town commissions to achieve a balanced 
growth for Medfield whereby Medfield retains its rural character and 
natural beauty while accomodating the reasonable needs of our citizens. 
It sees its role as one of contributing to the protection of ecologi- 
cally significant areas, namely the town's water supply and flood prone 
areas, and one of preserving natural resources which give character 
and shape to the environment we all value and desire to maintain. We 
believe that laws such as zoning by-laws , Board of Health regulations , 
Wetlands Act, and Environmental Protection Act serve to accomplish the 
former and therefore intend to change our policy from seeking to purchase 
wetlands to seeking to purchase land which falls into the latter category. 
In fact the Corps of Engineers received funds in late 1974 to buy all 
Charles River Wetlands. Our number one priority, as detailed in the Open 
Space Plan is to purchase additional undeveloped land in the Noon Hill 
area. Our second priority is to seek easements along the brooks which 
supply ourwater. Our third priority is to work with the Planning Board 
and other town boards to encourage and accomplish development which takes 
into consideration preservation of open land, using such concepts as 
cluster housing. We will ocntinue to review other land acquisition 
opportunities as they present themselves and if they fall into our stand- 
ards for preservation, we will give the town the opportunity to vote for 
acquisition. We also intend to develop an educational program to inform 
the town's residents about conservation. One of our first projects in 
this regard will be to publish a map showing the location of conservation 



58 



lands and other significant semi-public open lands, together with rules 
about their use, as soon as the Noon Hill acquisition is completed. 

We again extend our open invitation to anyone who may wish to 
attend our meetings, notice of which are posted on the bulletin board 
in the Town Hall. 

Respectfully submitted, 

\kcUhio Vd&UiZMll, Chairman 
EIZm E. Gl^ond 
RlckaAd M. HeJXLgmann 
Rob&U Hilton 
Ca/iolinz Standtzy 
Robojut Kinsman 
Hanson C. Robbing 

Associate Members 
Robojit Ely ant 
JoAzpk Vonnztty 
Jam Minting &i 



59 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

and Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

Following is the report of the Board of Health for the year 1974. 

The activities of the Board extended, as usual, into various areas, 
most notably the following: 

Public Health Nursing (including immunization clinics) 
Regulation and inspection of milk stores, food stores, 

restaurants, school cafeterias, etc. 
Regulation and inspection of on-site sewage disposal systems 

(including the abandonment of any such system) 
Weekly testing of water at swim pond during summer 
Garbage collections 

Animal control regulations and inspections 
Annual rabies clinic 
Review of plans for proposed subdivisions, apartment complexes 

Residents and local businessmen should understand that in any under- 
taking subject to regulation and inspection by the Board of Health, 
application must be made to the Board for a permit before proceeding. 
Copies of the applicable regulations may be obtained from the Board of 
Health at the Town Hall. 

INSPECTION OF FOOD STORES, RESTAURANTS, ETC . 

A major area of responsibility of the Board is the inspection of 
all establishments where food or beverages are prepared, sold, or served 
to the public — i.e., stores, restaurants, caterers, school cafeterias 
bars and vending machines. These inspections include taking random 
samples of milk for laboratory analysis, swab-testing of restaurant 
dishes and utensils, checking water temperatures in dishwashers, etc., 
in addition to observing (and, if necessary requiring improvement in) 
general cleanliness and maintenance procedures. In most cases, four 
inspections a year are made, but additional inspections are made where 
circumstances require. 

During 1975 the Board plans to conduct one or more clinics dealing 
with sanitation standards and cleaning procedures for guidance of local 
food store and restaurant owners. 

ON-SITE SEWAGE DISPOSAL SYSTEMS 

As a community develops and more and more houses are built, fewer 
and fewer desirable building locations remain available. As a result, 

would-be developers tend to be left with the more marginal locations for 
building — for example, lots adjacent to swamps, lots with elevations only 

t 

60 



a few feet above the water table, lots with ledge or hardpan beneath, 
or lots with high percentages of clay in the soil. Factors such as 
these are of principal concern to the Board, which must weigh, on the 
one hand, the right of the individual to use his land profitable, and 
on the other hand, the dangers to the public health that can result 
from pollution of nearby swamps and streams, or from a malfunctioning 
(and possibly overflowing) on-site septic system. As a result, our 
regulations are constantly in a fluid state as we try to keep them 
relevant to existing circumstances. 

Prior to the installation of any on-site septic system, a Board of 
Health permit must be applied for and a detailed plan (completed in 
accordance with the regulations) must be submitted to the Board for 
its approval. All required percolation tests must be personally ob- 
served by the Board of Health Agent, who also must certify to the 
accuracy of required soil logs. 

During 1974, 50 permits were granted for on-site sewage disposal 
systems. 

Regulations of the Board of Health apply not only to the installa- 
tion of new systems, but also to the repair or replacement of existing 
ones. Appropriate additional regulations are currently being developed 
with respect to on-site systems which are to be abandoned as home owners 
elect to connect their homes to our new and expanding public sewer 
system. 

SWIMMING POOL REGULATIONS 



Whenever a swimming pool is to be installed (above or below ground) 
on a lot containing an on-site septic system, particular care must be 
taken to make sure there is adequate distance between the two. Mainly 
for this reason the Board requires the submission of a plan (including 
the overall plot plan) for its approval before construction. 

During 1974, 42 permits were issued by the Board of Health for pools 

HINKLEY MEMORIAL POND 

The Hinkley ^Pond was inspected and water samples taken each week 
during the summer of 1974. Water quality last year was consistently 
satisfactory, with all samples tested exceeding minimum standards by 
a comfortable margin. Visibility tests also proved acceptable. The 
Board commends the Park and Recreation Commission for the extensive 
preparatory work performed prior to the 1974 opening and for the 
excellent maintenance observed during the summer months. 

GARBAGE COLLECTIONS 

The garbage contract was renewed with Francis J. Cassidy of Medway , 
the sole bidder. Collections are made once a week during the cold 
months and twice a week during the summer. We are happy to report that 
the cost of garbage collection has remained at the same level for the 



61 



past several years, and is expected to be the same again for the current 
1975-76 fiscal year. 

LICENSING, MAINTENANCE, AND 1NN0CULATI0N OF ANIMALS 

Animal Control Regulations prohibit the keeping of horses, live- 
stock, and certain other animals and fowl except by permit of the Board 
of Health. (Dog licenses are issued by the Town Clerk.) Permits are 
renewable on April 15 (May 15 in the case of horses) of each year. 
Copies of the Regulations may be obtained at the Town Hall. 

All horses must be inoculated annually for encephalitis. Such 
inoculations must be made and certified to by a licensed veterinarian 
in the spring of each year prior to granting of a permit. 

Dogs must be inoculated against rabies at the age of six months and 
revaccinated at intervals not exceeding twenty- four months, as a condi- 
tion to being licensed. An annual RABIES CLINIC, available to all 
residents at a small fee, is held each spring at the Fire Station and 
dogs may be inoculated and licensed at the same time. 

Dogs that were inoculated in 1973 should be immunized again in 
March of 1975. 

During 1974, 31 permits were issued for keeping horses and/or live- 
stock. Two commercial stable licenses were issued. State Regulations 
now require state licensing of all riding instructors as well as stables 
boarding or renting horses to the public. 

Richard Ellsworth, Animal Inspector, reminds residents that all 
animal bites or scratches should be reported immediately to him or the 
Board of Health in order that he may quarantine the animal, and if 
necessary arrange for a laboratory examination. 

Wild animals and wild fowl may not be kept without a special State 
license. 

OTHER PERMITS ISSUED 

During 1974 the following additional permits were issued: 

Food Establishments (restaurants and counters) 13 

Retail stores and markets 5 

Catering 2 

Milk licenses (stores and vehicle) 10 

Effluent Cartage 8 

Funeral directors 3 

Septic installers' permits 18 

Syringe permits 2 

Laundromats 1 

Bakeries 2 

Ice Cream making 1 

The total income received from all permits - $3,195.50. 

62 



RADIOACTIVE INCIDENT 

Because of its unusual nature, it would be perhaps be appropriate 
to mention briefly one incident that was brought to the Board's atten- 
tion in 1974. Apparently because of improper packaging, there was a 
reported leak of radioactive material from a package delivered to a 
local industrial concern. Fortunately the problem was discovered almost 
immediately and all appropriate steps were taken to dispose of the 
material without harm to any person. Following the incident, a member 
of the Board met with officials of the company and verified that all 
procedures involving the handling of such materials are being performed 
in accordance with strict AEC standards. 

REGISTERED SANITARIANS 

Board of Health inspections during the year were performed by 
Ferial Morrissette and John J. Keefe. As Mr. Morrissette will be re- 
tiring in 1975, the Board takes this opportunity to express its apprecia- 
tion for the loyal and highly competent service he has given our town 
during his association with us. We wish him good health, happiness, and 
prosperity in retirement. 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE 

The Visiting Nurse Association under Mrs. Porter Whitney, R.N., 
who serves as Public Health Nurse in Medfield for the Board of Health 
reports the following visits which include bedside care, therapeutic 
nursing, public health nursing involving TB prevention and follow-ups, 
communicable diseases, new born, maternal care, health teaching and 
referrals, as well as premature infants: 

Immunization Clinics 2 

(immunizations - 106) 
Senior Citizens' Blood Pressure Program 8 

(attendance - 115) 
Senior Citizens' Flu Clinic 1 

(attendance - 60) 
Day Care: Pre-Kindergarten and Nursery Schools 18 

(schools covered - 5) 
New Mantoux Testing Program for Faculty and 

Personnel of Schools and others in community 256 

Meetings attended 
In-Service Educat: 

Nursing Services: 





25 


Sessions attended 


8 


Cases 


89 


Visits 


506 


Physical Therapy Cases 


4 


Physical Therapy Visits 


37 


Home Health Service 


40 



63 



Other programs involving public health nursing include work and 
follow-up on the Lions Club Glaucoma Clinic, Pre-School Vision Screen- 
ing Clinic, Medfield Home Committee, talks to Brownie troops, telephone 
advice, information and referrals, as well as all communicable diseases 
and follow-ups for TB and Salmonella. 

The Board of Health has a Vaccine Supply Center under the direction 
of Mrs. Whitney who stocks and inventories supplies for distribution to 
local physicians. 

BOARD OF HEALTH MEETINGS 

All meetings of the Board of Health are open to the public, and 
all interested citizens are invited to attend. Meetings are held at 
7:30 P.M. on the second and fourth Mondays of each month at the Town 
Hall. Additional meetings are held as circumstances require. 

Respectfully submitted, 



VJi2.deAA.ck C. Temple, Chairman 
RlckaAd H. Whclan, clerk 
JoAcpk A. McuvinoIZa 
Board of Health 



THE COUNCIL ON AGING 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

and Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

The Medfield Council on Aging has completed another successful 
year. One of our areas of major interest and support during the last 
year has become a reality with the beginning of construction on housing 
for the elderly. The Wilkins Glen project is particularly of interest 
to us because it is named for and located on land owned by the late 
Orrin Wilkins, one of the original members of the Council on Aging. 
Senior Citizen Housing on Pound Street now will be a reality also. We 
have supported this project since our inception as a Council and feel 
our support and work toward this goal has not been in vain. Our major 
interest for the coming year will be to continue our search for a drop- 
in center for the senior citizen in town. We have a very active group 
of senior citizens who seem to be busy all the time. The Council on 
Aging has provided transportation for the senior citizens to travel to 
Plymouth, the Ice Follies, Salem Willows, Freedom Trail, Lake Sunapee, 
Woods Hole, etc. Again this year several outings were held at Rocky 
Woods with the Council providing entertainment. 

The Council is now working on an information booklet to be given 
to all senior citizens in town to aid them in almost any phase of their 
lives. Flu shots were provided by the council to any senior citizen in 
town desiring to have one. All our present programs are continuing with 

« 

64 



a new discount merchant list due out soon. To serve our senior citizens 
better, we are investigating a program of Meals on Wheels as well as the 
possibility of a donation of a minibus for their use. 

There were 3 resignations from the Council during the year with 
3 new members appointed by Selectmen and one member reappointed to 
continue serving on the Council. Members of the council as well as a 
number of senior citizens have attended regional Council on Aging 
Meetings, & Town Committee Meetings. The Council received a certificate 
from the American Red Cross in gratitude for the work of Gerald Bangs 
and Charles Doyle in the Social Security Income Alert Program. One of 
our members is serving as a liaison to the Park and Recreation Commission . 

We wish to thank all who have contributed in any way to making the 
year one of success for the Council on Aging and Senior Citizens. 

Respectfully submitted, 



\) AJiQAjlia, CoupQA, President 
B&tty McwUn, Secretary 
GviaZd Bang*, Treasurer 
MadelsLne. HcUidlng, Vice President 
Chants Voylo, ■ 
Votiotky AvKUtaAyLa 
Bcutbcuta VdAXvioUL 
Edition FlakeAty 
Atbu>on UVUch 



65 




C/) 



? i'^ 



THE PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

and Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

Recreation is no longer an isolated concept about "refreshment 
after toil." Instead it is now part of the fabric of American life. 
Recreation is an integral part of the quality of life one generation 
hopes to achieve and pass on to the next. Recreation may progress 
from a community of open spaces and parks to a community that in itself 
resembles a park. It may grow from a community with selected recrea- 
tional activities for teen-agers to a community with a cultural environ- 
ment responsive to the interests of all ages and groups of people. 

The year 1974 witnessed a continued expansion of the Commission's 
activities in terms of both number of programs offered and number of 
participants. In addition to its daily operations, the Commission, in 
accordance with Town Meeting action, devoted a great deal of time and 
effort in planning for the future. 

The spectrum of recreational programs offered ranged from Saturday 
movies for young children to exercise classes for adults. A partial 
list would include gymnastics, girls' softball, girls' and boys' basket- 
ball, dances, ice skating, women's volleyball and girls' and boys' 
soccer. 

During the Summer, a very successful playground program, under the 
direction of Recreation Coordinator Dick Cantrell, attracted many 
children and featured arts and crafts, nature studies, a visit from 
the Franklin Zoo and trips to a Red Sox game and Wallex Recreation 
Center. 

Our swimming season at Hinkley Memorial Park was very successful 
with the pond having been drained, cleaned, gravel added and a new 
sand bottom. Approximately 800 youngsters took advantage of the 
swimming instruction program. 

Four tennis courts were opened in Metacomet Park in the fall, 
with lights installed later to permit maximum utilization. The entire 
Park was improved through brush cutting, planting and grass mowing. 

The Youth Center building, which is utilized by many groups for 
a multitude of activities ranging from bazaars to dog obedience 
training, is in the process of a physical rehabilitation program which 
includes new steel exterior doors, wiring, plumbing, fire-alarm system, 
painting and cleaning. A Junior High Youth Board has been formed to 
promote activities at the building and elsewhere for that age group. 
The Junior High and Senior High Adult Advisory Boards have been most 
helpful in operating the Youth Center. Last Summer, the building was 
open for a number of weeks as a drop-in center. 

67 



Vandalism to properties and facilities controlled by the 
Commission is still a problem although it appears to have decreased in 
relation to recent years. 

In the area of long-range planning, the Commission retained the 
services of Technical Planning Associates to assist in conjunction with 
other boards in the town, various alternatives for the further develop- 
ment of Metacomet Park, the Hinkley Pond area, and the 56 acres off 
Hospital Road, owned by the town. 

The Park and Recreation Commission is indebted to other town 
departments who have been most cooperative, to the garden clubs which 
have helped beautify our parks, and to the many citizens who gave so 
generously of their time and effort in making our programs successful. 

Respectfully submitted, 



&*/CC W. O'TSfilm, Chairman 
kitkuJi F. McEvoy, clerk 
Andnew Thompson, Ji. 

WltUam J. WdJLlQJi 
Wcui/im F. SkzaAd 
BcutbaJia HatlH 
Nancy LaJoldZ, Resigned 



RickcUud ColviXaqUL, Co-ordinator 



68 



THE TREE WARDEN AND PEST CONTROL DIRECTOR 






To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

With the fiscal year only half over it is difficult to write a 
report of projects not started at this time or only partially completed. 
I have therefore decided it would be much more meaningful to the tax- 
payers to report on work completed in the calendar year 1974. 

Much time was spent repairing tree damage sustained in the ice 
storm of December 17, 1973. Some trees were damaged to the extent 
removal was necessary but most splits and breaks could be repaired 
with no permanent effect to the tree itself. We also continued our 
routine pruning program which includes raising low limbs over side- 
walks and roads, intersections for visibility and clearing firealarm 
wires and street lights. 

Our tree planting program, in operation for over sixty years, 
was continued with the planting of forty-three trees of varieties such 
as Sugar Maple, Tulip tree, Sweetgum, Flowering Crabs, Lindens, and 
Pin Oaks. These were planted in various locations not only where trees 
had been removed but in other open spaces also. 

The aerial spray for Gypsy Moth control was very satisfactory with 
only minor damage in most residential areas. This year's hatch of 
Gypsy Moths is not expected to be as large as this past year. 

The Dutch Elm Disease continues to spread in spite of our control 
attempts. We tried two systemic materials experimentally to control 
the Dutch Elm Disease with poor results. We have removed all dead Elms 
on town property and have pruned and will be spraying our more prominent 
specimens this Spring to continue our program to save the State tree. 

Respectfully submitted, 



EltU N. kULan, 

Tree Warden 

Local Director of Insect 

Pest Control 



69 



THE NORFOLK COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Submitted herewith is the report of the Norfolk County Mosquito 
Control Project of its activities in the Town of Medfield for the year 
ending December 31, 1974. 

Pre*-hatch dust larvicide by backpack 50 acres 

Aerial applied larvicide 2206 acres 

Larvicide by backpack and mistblowers 158 acres 
Catch basin application for larvicide and adulticide 1129 

Adulticide mistblowing from trucks 5766 acres 

Aerial U.L.V. adulticide application 2560 acres 

Ground U.L.V. adulticide application 1280 acres 

Drainage ditches cleaned 8925 feet 

Brush obstructing drainage cut 1535 feet 

Culverts cleaned and opened 27 

Recorded calls for information and assistance 41 

Respectfully submitted, 



Alb&ut W. HnuAQA, 
Superintendent 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report for Veterans' Benefits Assistance and 
Veterans' Services for the year ending December 31, 1974. 

The following is a breakdown of service and assistance rendered 
Medfield Veterans and their dependents as authorized by the Commission 
of Veterans' Services: 

VETERANS' BENEFITS 

This assistance includes food, clothing, fuel and medical expenses 
for Veterans and their dependents which the state reimburses fifty 
percent to the community. 

Application for Ordinary Assistance 37 

Benefits Administered 26 



70 



VETERANS 1 SERVICES 

This program is designed to orient and educate the veteran with 
regard to Federal and State programs of assistance and direct them 
toward the institutional programs. 

Hospitalization 11 

Education 37 

Burial Allowance 16 

Civil Service 14 

Social Security 29 

Pension Assistance 21 

I wish to thank Charlotte Randolph and town officials for their 
cooperation and assistance this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 



PauZ F. CuAAan, 
Veterans ' Agent 



71 



THE DOG OFFICER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report as Dog Officer for the year ending 
December 31, 1974. 

As of September 2, 1974, I became full time Dog Officer to enforce 
the new dog control by-law. 

Before September 2: 

Dogs returned to owners 23 

Dogs killed by automobiles 9 

Dogs picked up by dog officer 34 

Dogs returned to other towns 2 

Dogs restrained by dog officer 8 

From September 2 to December 31: 

During the last six months 284 complaints were received 
which were investigated and/or resolved. 

Dogs killed by automobiles 3 
Dogs picked up by dog officer 242 
Court citations given 212 
Dogs registered 1974 1186 
Kennels registered 1974 14 
Dogs returned to other towns 18 

Respectfully submitted, 



Dog Officer 



72 



THE BUILDING INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

and Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

The following is my annual report for the year ending December 
31, 1974. 

I have issued a total of 239 Building Permits (1973 - 243) as 
listed below, and have made a total of 743 inspections together with 
Rebel Palumbo, Assistant Building Inspector and some by Richard 
Ostrander who filled in while Mr. Palumbo was away. In 1973, 787 
inspections were made. 

The following is a breakdown of permits issued: 

New Single family dwellings 42 

Additions to private dwellings 35 

Renovations to private dwellings 40 

Multi-Family 102 units 1 

10 bldgs., plus 1 bldg. for 

Recreation 

Renovations to business buildings 4 

Additions to business buildings 1 

Renovations to industrial buildings 1 

Additions to industrial buildings 3 

Private swimming pools 43 

Private horse stables 3 
Reshingling roofs and installation of 

new side walls 56 

Demolitions 1 

Tennis court 1 

Private greenhouses 2 

Residential garages 2 

Trailers (temporary) 2 

TOTAL PERMITS 239 

Total income from Building permit fees $5,862.00 
(1973 - $4,422.50) 

Estimated construction costs $1,604,000.00 

on new dwellings 
(1973 - $1,858,000.00) 

Estimated construction costs $1,393,603.00 

renovations, additions, pools, 
shingling & sidewalls 
(1973 - $2,015,440.00) 



73 



Renovations & additions 
on industrial 
(1973 - $27,950.00) $50,000.00 

Renovations and additions 
on business 
(1973 - $19,800.00) $120,300.00 

New construction on 

industrial business 

(1973 - $940,000.00) 

New multi-family building 

102 units - 10 buildings 

and 1 building for recreation $1,530,000.00 

Chapter 802 of the Acts of 1972 will take effect on January 1, 
1975 and the Inspector of Buildings will enforce the new State Code. 

I wish to thank the Town officials, the other department 
inspectors, the administrative secretaries in the Town Hall and Mrs. 
Mae Otting for the assistance and cooperation they have rendered me 
during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 



WQJtbwt B. BuSUi, 
Building Inspector 



THE BUILDING CODE COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

and Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

The Building Code Committee functions as an advisory board for the 
Building Inspector on problems that originate with his department. 

Meetings are held when required and not with regularity. 

Under the State Building Code Commission made by authority of 
Chapter 802 of the Acts of 1972 as amended and entitled the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts State Building Code which becomes effective 
January 1, 1975, Section 126.8 requires that Medfield shall establish 
a local or regional building code board of appeals. 

Therefore, it is the opinion of this Building Code Committee, 
that this Committee be disolved and the present members be appointed to 



74 



The newly formed Medfield Building Code Board of Appeals for the terms 
as specified in Section 126.81 State Building Code. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Hi,dko!UUi LaveAgkeXta, 
Chairman 



THE ANIMAL INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and the 
Honorable Board of Health: 

The following is my report for the year ending December 31, 1974: 

Fifty-four (54) dogs alleged to have bitten or scratched people 
were quarantined for a period of ten (10) days. When these animals 
were checked at the end of the quarantine period, none of them showed 
any evidence of rabies. 

One hampster, one mouse, one cat, one weasel, one guinea pig, and 
one raccoon were sent to the Wasserman Laboratory for examination for 
rabies. None of them showed any evidence of rabies. 

Twenty-eight stables used for shelters for horses, sheep, goats, 
beef cattle, or swine were examined for general cleanliness, sufficient 
water, adequate light, and conformation to Board of Health rules and 
regulations. 

For the annual inspection, a total of 72 horses, 11 ponies, 
22 beef cattle, 34 sheep, 2 goats, and 7 swine were inspected for and 
appeared to be free from any communicable disease. 

I would like to entend my sincere thanks to Kay Conners , the 
Board of Health, the Police Department, and all other departments that 
aided me in carrying out my duties as animal inspector. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Rlckcuid A. ElL&woJitk, 
Animal Inspector 



75 



THE GAS INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report as Gas Inspector for the year ended 
December 31, 1974. 

Number of permits issued 70 

Inspections by Gas Inspector 81 

Inspections by Acting Inspector 9 

Total of fees collected $500.00 

Total monies expended $592.50 

I recommend that the charge for permits be increased to defray 
the increasing cost of inspections. 

I wish to extend thanks to the Town Officials, Town Secretaries, 
and the other Inspectors for their help and cooperation during the 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 



WcUttoji R. Nye,, 
Gas Inspector 



THE PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

For the period of January 1, 1974 to December 31, 1974. 

Plumbing Permits issued 96 

Plumbing Inspections made 212 

Permit Fees turned over to Treasurer $1449.00 

Inspections by Plumbing Inspector 112 

Inspections by Assistant Plumbing Inspector 100 

I wish to thank Marie Burke and the office personnel for their 
help in the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 



G&0K.QZ E. Wt/e, 
Plumbing Inspector 

76 



THE WIRING INSPECTOR 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report for the year ending December 31, 1974. 

Permits issued 240 

Inspections made 374 

Income from wiring permits $1827.50 

Departmental expenses $2540.90 

At this time I would like to thank the Town Secretaries, Fred 
Conley and the other inspectors for their help and cooperation during 
the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 



JoA&ph F. EhAkslnii, Jk. , 
Inspector of Wiring 



THE SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The following is my annual report for the year 1974. 

Scales Sealed 

Over 10,000 lbs. 

5,000 to 10,000 lbs. 

100 to 5,000 lbs. 6 

Under 100 lbs. 23 

Weights 

Avoirdupois 27 

Apothecary 22 

Automatic Measures 

Gas Pumps 22 

Grease Pumps 

Yard Sticks 4 

Tapes 

Total 145 

Trial Weighings of Commodities 150 

An added duty of the sealer is weekly checking unit pricing in 
our stores. 



77 



Expenses 




Salary 


$175.00 


Telephone and Transportation 


72.50 


Bond 


10.00 


Supplies 


43.14 


Total 


$300.64 


Receipts 




Sealing Fees 


$121.50 



Sincerely, 



Sealer Weights and Measures 



REGIONAL REFUSE DISPOSAL PLANNING COMMITTEE 

In 1974 the Southwest Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Board 
directed its efforts toward providing input to the Norfolk County Com- 
prehensive Solid Waste Management Study. The County Commissioners had 
drafted Senate Bill #579 for 1974 Legislative approval to impliment the 
proposals put forth in the Study. The Southwest Board felt implementa- 
tion pre-mature as the County's final report was not due until mid-year. 
Also the Board felt the legislation first proposed by the County did not 
give the towns adequate safeguards or representation in the expenditure 
of 60 million dollars. The Southwest Board opposed Senate #579 although 
an improved re-draft was presented by the County at its hearing April 8, 
1974, before the Senate Committee on Natural resources and Agriculture. 
The Board did recommend at this hearing that the County study be con- 
tinued for another year. Senate #579 was not acted upon in 1974. The 
Board decided the County Plan should include certain safeguards with 
regards to: site selections, expenditure of funds, freedom to partici- 
pate and charges being assessed to users only and not non-participating 
towns. 

The County Commissioners agreed to include these' safeguards in their 
1975 Legislation, Senate Bill S-381. The Board has endorsed S-381 which 
will be heard before the Senate Committee on Counties February 7, 1975. 
The Medfield Board of Selectmen voted on January 28, 1975, to endorse 
S-381 and so advised the County Commissioners. 

Hopefully S-381 will be approved by the Legislature as the towns 
represented by the Southwest Board will be elgible for the first facility 

The County Facility will not only process refuse but will incorpor- 
ate resource recovery systems for recycling or energy reclamation or 
both. This will greatly reduce the volume of material which must ulti- 
mately end up in a landfill. Conservative estimates by the Consultant 
Engineers, Camp, Dresser and McKee indicate about a one- third reduction 
in processing cost per ton by the inclusion of resource recovery systems 
in the process. 

78 



If the County does not succeed in getting approval for a regional 
facility the Southwest Regional Board will probably proceed under exis- 
ting legislation to become a legal entity capable to building a Regional 
Facility of its own. 

In a 1974 report to the Town of Medfield by Consultant Engineers, 
Metcalf & Eddy, our existing landfill has a life expectancy to 1977. 
Although there is Town-owned land adjacent to the landfill, it may not 
be suitable for landfill use without expensive site development. A 
portion of this area is wet-lands and use is subject to approval of the 
Conservation Commission, Board of Health and the State. It is hoped that 
a regional facility for solid waste disposal will be available to 
Medfield before we are forced to expand our landfill. 

This Committee wishes to express its thanks to former Executive 
Secretary, Frederick Conley for his able assistance and continued 
interest in our progress. 

Respectfully submitted, 



RobQAt P. CQAeAl 

Pzyton C. Ma/ick , 

Medfield Regional Refuse 
Disposal Planning Committee 



79 



DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The work of the Commission proceeded, but without any great forward 
motion during 1974, primarily because the predominant portion of the 
Town's industrial land is held by one interest whose desire to sell or 
retain ownership remains unclear. With the completion of Route 27 and 
the stage set for the installation of certain utilities, the attractive- 
ness to potential builders of plants has been much enhanced, and it 
remains only for a negotiable level to be reached for this land to be 
developed successfully. 

Another large portion of land in the same general vicinity off 
Route 27 does now seem to be on the verge of development, with the 
projected construction of a tennis facility. The 1974 Annual Town 
Meeting approved a zoning change making it possible for a recreational 
facility of this type to be built on industrial land by means of a 
special permit. The Commission lent its full support to this effort. 
Apparently plans will move forward on the project, awaiting only the 
necessary private financing. 

During the year a very important new function was accepted by the 
Commission, that being the coordination of efforts to beautify the 
Town's central business district. Though not specifically charged by 
the statutes of the Commonwealth to take on such a duty, the Commission 
felt that an improved appearance of this important section of the Town 
is germane to its attracting industry. This new thrust in the Commis- 
sion's work was an outgrowth of a panel discussion held by the League 
of Women Voters in which the Commission's Chairman was a participant. 
The emphases of the project will be two-fold — short term and long 
term; the mandate — improvement in the area of signs, parking and 
landscaping. The long term aspects necessarily will require extensive 
study for proper implementation. In the short term area, however, there 
are a number of directions which can be pursued quickly, so as to make 
an immediate impact, and these are already in process. Merchants have 
been approached to create an organization such as a local Chamber of 
Commerce, where agreement can be reached among the participants for the 
benefit of all in the scope of making aesthetically more acceptable 
store fronts and parking areas, and converting useless areas into beauty 
spots where there exists a potential for landscaping. Hopefully, much 
of this can be accomplished prior to Medfield's anniversary celebration 
in 1976. 

The Commission plans to ask for funds at the 1975 Annual Town 
Meeting to create a public parking facility at the rear of the Town 
Hall, and for the improvement of the area directly in front of that 

building. In addition to the very practical end served by this dual 
project, there is the hope that the merchants and the citizenry will 

80 



respond in a spirit of true cooperation. A special sub- commit tee has 
been formed by the Commission to study the possibilities of obtaining 
financial aid from Federal and State agencies, and from private founda- 
tions. The Commission is working in close harmony with the other Town 
Departments to cover all aspects of this improvement program and to 
avoid duplication of effort. The League of Women Voters has volunteered 
to conduct certain studies of other Towns' accomplishments along these 
lines. 

The Commission invited Mr. John Reach and Mr. Edward Ringland of 
the Massachusetts Urban Job Incentive Bureau and various Medfield 
employers to attend one of its meetings. The outcome was very favorable, 
especially in the case of one employer and also served to prove that 
there are many ways in which the Commission can be helpful beyond its 
basic statutory responsibilities. 

The Commission regretted the resignation of Mr. Keith Costa due 
to relocation. His ability and knowledge will be missed. Mr. William P. 
Mikelonis was appointed to fill the unexpired term, and already has made 
a valuable contribution to the work of the Commission. 

The Commission is grateful to the Board of Selectmen for its help 
and confidence, to the other Departments of the Town for their coopera- 
tion, to Mrs. Pauline Goucher, to Mr. William McCarthy and to Mr. 
Frederick Conley for their responsiveness and valuable assistance. The 
Town is in debt to the League of Women Voters for its initiative in 
bringing out in the open a hitherto neglected subject — a positive 
approach to the improvement of the central business district. 

Respectfully submitted, 

IticittVi M. Vtiank, Chairman 
Clayton H. HcUgk, Vice Chairman 
Bmjamln P. Abtlzy, Secretary 
GaonQQ, M. Giakam, J/i. 
Vonald H. HoJiding 
Jokn 0. Elu&Lom 
^Wiiam P. tilkaZoyuA 
Development and Industrial 
Commission 



81 



THE HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Historical Commission of the Town of Medfield submits here- 
with its second annual report, covering the calendar year 1974, during 
which the Commission met monthly. 

The membership of the Commission was increased when the Select- 
men appointed five associate members, who have a voice in all discus- 
sion, but not a vote. Their special interests have contributed greatly 
to the work of the Commission in several areas. (Mrs. Claire Reed, who 
was appointed to fill a vacancy, did not serve owing to conflicting 
obligations. ) 

The work of the commission can be summarized under several 
headings: 

1. NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES 

THE FIRST PARISH UNITARIAN , whose application to have its 
meeting house placed on the National Register was sent by 
our commission to the Massachusetts Historical Commission, 
and by it forwarded to Washington with State approval, 
received word that the meeting house had been placed on the 
National Register of Historic Places as of April 18, 1974. 
As a consequence, the First Parish has been voted by the 
National Park Service a grant of $6,400. for repairs and 
restoration, conditional upon the raising of an equal sum 
from other sources. 

PEAK HOUSE . Title research has proceeded most satisfactorily. 
Clues furnished by William S. Tilden's History of Medfield 
have led us to the Town of Medfield' s records of land grants, 
town meetings , births , marriages , and deaths ; further to the 
Suffolk and Norfolk Registries of Deeds and Probate; and 
finally to the State Archives. From the above, particularly 
from the Archives, it has become certain that the money voted 
by the General Court in 1680 for re-construction of a Clark 
house destroyed in 1676 by King Philip's Indians was granted 
to Benj amin Clark, (and not to Seth, who was not born until 
1687.'). The chain of title now seems quite clearly traceable 
from Benjamin Clark down to Fred. M. Smith who deeded the 
Peak House to the Medfield Historical Society in 1924. 

Expert examination of the structure of the Peak House has 
carried our research into its probable age far beyond what 



82 



amateurs could reasonably expect to ascertain. The Medfield 
Historical Society, owner of the Peak House, has financed two 
inspections of the building, in July and October of 1974, by 
Mr. Abbott Lowell Cummings, director of the Society for the 
Preservation of New England Antiquities, and the most highly 
regarded authority on 17th century New England architecture. 
Mr. Cummings is prepared to state his considered opinion that 
the Peak House is definitely a 17th century house. When his 
written report has been given to the Historical Society, the 
Commission will then be able to complete the application for 
the Peak House to be added to the National Register of Historic 
Places. 

2. HISTORICAL INVENTORY. 

Begun several years ago by the Medfield Historical Society, 
this listing and description of Medfield f s historic structures 
has been advanced in 1973 and 1974 by the Commission, largely 
in the past year by the addition of 19th century houses. 

The inventory puts the Commission in a position to offer infor- 
mation that may save historic properties from obliteration by 
publicly funded or publicly licensed projects; and ensures 
that knowledge of historic structures will be available to all 
municipal officials and boards concerned with the various 
aspects of town planning. In other words, preservation has 
now become a tool or method of planning. This point was em- 
phasized by the speaker at a "forum" recently attended by one 
of our members at the Society for the Preservation of New 
England Antiquities in Boston; and also was in evidence at 
the October open meeting of the Medfield League of Women Voters 
on the subject of our central business district, when an 
inquiry came from the audience as to whether Medfield had any 
listing of its historic assets. 

3. BAKER'S POND 

One of our members represents the Commission on the special 
committee which hopes to present plans to the Town for the 
preservation and beautification of the pond area. 

4. VINE LAKE CEMETERY 

Another member is planning to plot the layout of the early 
section of the cemetery, established in 1651; and to enter 
on the plan the information listed in a book written in 1899 
that gives all cemetery inscriptions to that date. The 
possibility is also being considered of applying for a 
Federal grant for cleaning the ancient stones and re-carving 
their inscriptions. A great deal of early Medfield history 
is written upon them. 



83 



5. REPRINTING OF WILLIAM S. TILDEN'S HISTORY OF MEDFIELD 

Definite plans for this project have begun to take shape 
after consultation with the Curators of the Medfield 
Historical Society and with Town Counsel. The Historical 
Society has agreed to cooperate with the project, and to 
be a sponsor for the reprinting. 

The Historical Commission would like to re-emphasize its 
conviction that the re-publication of Tilden is vital to the 
survival of this unique and comprehensive compendium of 
Medfield' s early history, an invaluable resource for students 
of all ages. Virtually no usable copies exist today of the 
1887 edition. Those possessed by the Medfield Public Library, 
which reports a steady demand for the book, as well as the 
few owned by the old families, are likely to have worn, broken 
bindings and tattered pages. Even rare book shops seldom 
have a copy. 

The Commission has been aided in its work by many people, but 
would like to thank particularly Fred Conley and Pauline Goucher, and 
Charlotte Randolph. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Historical Commission 

Donald J. MacVonald, Chairman 
Lou/id H. Smith 
Elzanofi Ante 
■ A/ithu/i McCcuuty 

Associate Members, 
Robojvt Like. 
Wiltiam F. lAaCcuvtky 
Roy UdQiLiZtan 
Anna. Ihtntzvi 
Vavid {jJilmaAtk 



84 



325th ANNIVERSARY AND SPECIAL BICENTENNIAL COMMITTEE 



The Anniversary Committee has been meeting at least bi-monthly 
throughout the year. The response from the town from all area residents 
has been most gratifying. The year 1974 has been one of firmly estab- 
lishing the Committee, a goal under which the Committee is to function, 
the establishment of an agenda of events to be held during 1975 and 1976, 
and the successful solicitation of financial and volunteer assistance 
from the Town of Medfield. Approximately 250 volunteers are already 
listed, many already involved, and many more people are coming forth 
each week. 

The goal of the 325th Anniversary and Special Bicentennial 
Committee is to present to the Town a proper and fitting celebration 
commemorating Medfield f s 325th anniversary and the Nation's bicentennial 
and, hopefully, upon a successful conclusion, to be able to present to 
the Town a gift of lasting value. It is of the utmost importance that 
every resident of the Town have the opportunity to participate, in some 
way, in the celebration. The celebration also presents the Townspeople 
with the opportunity to meet many additional residents of the Town, as 
well as residents of our surrounding towns. 

We opened our year with coffee hours, to acquaint our Townspeople 
with one of our main objectives - that of uniting our entire Town from 
North to South and East to West, and from our youth to our senior 
citizens - to celebrate together a common birthday party year. 

Our first actual publicity group, composed of a group of 9th grade 
girls under the direction of Mrs. Gail Leggett, our "Minute Maiden Mom", 
is called our "Medfield Minute Maidens". We hope many other groups will 
be forming. These girls serve at a "minute's notice", and have always 
come through for us, and achieved self-satisfaction. 

At the beginning of a two year reenactment of a chain of events 
to commemorate the birth of Bicentennial Celebrations of the American 
Revolution, September marked the reenactment of Paul Revere 's ride from 
Suffolk County, Massachusetts to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania with the 
Suffolk Resolves. On Sunday evening, September 8, 1974 your committee 
planned a ceremony as the rider passed through Medfield. He was pre- 
sented with the following Resolution which was included in the packet : 



WE V V I E IV RESOLUTION 

WHEREAS, on the. 29 th ofi Ve.ce.mbeA 1773, the. Committee, ofi CoM.eAponde.nce. 
ofi the. Town of, Mzdfi<LeZd In thz County ofi Sufifiolk, In lti> Acply to the. 
Committee, ofi CoAAeApondence. fion the. Town ofi Boston tn the. County ofi 

Sufifiolk included many ol the. fiu.ndame.ntaZ pnA.ncA.pteA embodied tn the. 
Suffolk ReAolveA ofi Se.pte.mbeA 1774, and 

85 



WHEREAS, the. Town o{ lhed{ield was one o{ the nineteen towns and districts 
o{ Su{{olk County whose del.egates, at the Town o{ Hilton, unanimously 
adopted the Su{{olk Resolves that were delivered by Paul Revere to the 
Massachusetts delegation at the Tinst Continental Congress bitting at 
Philadelphia, and 

WHEREAS, the 153 {reeholders and inhabitants o{ the Town o{ Med{ield on 
November 1774 passed a vote o{ compliance with the Agreement and Resolves 
adopted by the Eirst Continental Congress in October and {urther voted 
that the resolution o{ the Continental Congress be entered on Med{ield'* 
records , and 

WHEREAS, the inhabitants o{ Ued{ield through thetr Committee o{ Corres- 
pondence expressed to the Committee o{ Correspondence o{ the Town o{ 
Boston thetr concern {or the protection and preservation o{ their own 
liberties as welt as {or thote o{ ages and generations yet to come, 

NOW, THEREFORE, it is resolved that we, the inhabitants o{ the Town o{ 
Med{ield, renew our affirmation o{ tho*e ancient principles and great 
truths annunciated by our colonial forefathers that have preserved the 
rights o{ the individual and promoted the greatest nation the world has 
ever known, 

MOW, THEREFORE, it is further resolved that we, the inhabitants o{ the 
Town o{ \ked{ield, will contribute our {ull 4 hare in protecting the right* 
and privileges obtained by the struggle and &acnl{ice o{ our brave {ore- 
bears 4o that generations yet unborn i>ha!l enjoy {orever the {ruits o{ 
democracy. 

We wish Godspeed in carrying this message on your long journey to 
Philadelphia, 

Given unto our hands this third day o{ September in the year o{ our 
lord nineteen Hundred and Seventy- {our. 

Harry A. Kelleher, Chairman 
Joseph L. Uarcionette, Clerk 
Arthur L. Varrar 
BOARD Or SELECTMEN, MEVE1ELV 



Under the direction of Shirley Maples, the Youth Committee was 
formed on September 25, 1974. The Committee's goal is to get the young 
people of Medfield interested and involved in the celebrations to take 
place in 1976. 

The Committee's first action was to hold a contest among the Town's 
schools for the creation of a logo for the 325th Anniversary Committee's 
use on official communications. The winning entry was submitted by Ken 
Griff en, Hearthstone Drive. The first official use of this logo will be 
seen on the Anniversary Committee's stationery. The Committee's princi- 
pal responsibilities are to conduct the Miss Medfield Pageant in May 
1976, and to plan a meaningful program for Thanksgiving, 1976. 

86 




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The agenda for 1975, but more importantly, 1976, will include the 
following: establishment of a commemorative store to be coordinated by 
Beverly Hallowell, which will feature, among other items a commemorative 
coin, pewter ware, Staffordshire China, and a pictoral history book. The 
coin was designed by Mr. Byron Reed. One side of the coin contains a 
replica of the Peak House, thriteen stars which represent the thirteen 
original colonies, and the inscription "National Bicentennial - 1776-1976." 
The other side of the coin contains the Town Seal and the inscription 
"325th Anniversary - A Birthday for our Town and Nation". The design 
on the Staffordshire will be a drawing created by Mrs. Kenneth Brock 
showing the Unitarian Church and Baker's Pond. The Unitarian Church was 
once used as the Town's Meeting House and is of great historical signifi- 
cance. 

The Country Store where our items will be sold, along with tickets 
to functions, will be operated a few hours a week by women in colonial 
costume so that each purchase will be more meaningful. We will strive 
to have something of interest to each age group in Town, so that truly 
everyone can purchase a birthday present of Medfield. 

Mr. Robert Naughton has volunteered to organize a Lumberjack 
competition scheduled to be held in May of 1975. Mr. Naughton has a 
great deal of experience in lumber j acking and qualified contestants are 
expected from the entire New England area as well as the Midwest. This 
event should prove to be a valuable fund raiser to help underwrite 
succeeding events. 

A Town-wide Ecumenical Service is planned for April, 1976, under 
the coordination of Mr. Edward Otting. A 325th Anniversary Parade will 
be held in June 1976. This event is being coordinated by Mr. William 
Hallowell and is being chaired by Messrs. Thomas Blake and James Morris. 
Police Chief Mann and Fire Chief Ryan are included on the Parade 
Committee, and final plans for the route, fire and first aid coverage 
have been formulated. 

Under the direction of Dorothy Kane, the pictorial Heritage Book 
is presenting a very real and interesting challenge. We plan to "print 
1500-2000 copies of a hard cover book with 100 pages more or less. 
April 1975 has been set as our deadline for bids. Final specifications 
will be contingent upon prices quoted, due to the present inflationary 
times. The book will include: Town Government- Events and Wars, Industry, 
Schools, Organizations and Churches, People and Places of Interest. 
325 years is a long time to cover! 

Mr. David Wilmarth is actively working with the Post Office to 
establish a commemorative anniversary cancellation stamp for the Medfield 
Post Office. 

An Indian Affairs Committee is being formed, the aim of which is to 
be sure that the role of the area Indians is suitably noted. 

A local chapter of the Brothers of the Brush is being contemplated 
and a meeting will be held very soon between interested residents and 

88 




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representatives of organizations from surrounding towns. 

July 4, 1976, will be the official National 200th Birthday, and a 
suitable observance will be held. 

A Town-wide Chicken Barbecue, preceded by an old-fashioned Fire- 
man's Muster and Field Day is planned for September, 1976. Mr. Michael 
Tammero is coordinating this very large and fun-filled event. 

Coordinated by Barbara Cronin will be a House Tour for the month of 
December 1975 to be held as a festive Christmas Open House. We are 
considering the possibility of including homes from the seventeen hundreds 
up to present day. Also under consideration at this time is an old 
fashioned mock wedding to be held at the First Parish Unitarian Church 
which has recently been accepted into the National Register of Historic 
Places. 

Plans are also being made to hold an Anniversary Ball in October 
1976. It is very understandable that site location is a major task and 
Mr. Edward Barrett, Chairman, under the coordination of Mr. James 
Moynihan, is currently in the process of site selection. 

Mrs. Robert Coulter is coordinating a Senior Citizens Committee. 
The aim of this committee is to assure that our Senior Citizens are 
included in the various events. Transportation, care, etc., will be 
furnished by younger citizens who also will serve on this committee. 
The assistance of the Board of Selectmen is requested to assemble the 
names of the oldest Medfield residents so their participation in the 
parade and other events may be honored. 

Coordinated by Pauline Goucher is a Committee for the Display of 
Historical Memorabilia. The Committee is working on plans for a weekend 
in September of 1976 to be held jointly with a Home Town Exposition. 
We expect to include articles from the past which will encompass tri- 
butes to Medfield 's history over the years. We have plans to interview 
long-time residents to aid us in our search for a well-rounded exhibit 
of memorabilia and will also include current events. 

Patricia Rioux has formed a committee to plan the Home Town Exposi- 
tion to be held in conjunction with the Memorabilia Display and will also 
plan a Mayoral Contest as well as Civic Beautification Projects. 

It is important to point out that the items we will purchase from 
town funding at the annual town meeting in 1974 will be offered for sale 
the latter part of 1975. We expect to return to the town a sum of money 
nearly equal to the original appropriation. Funding we seek in 1975 will 
be necessary for actual events in 1975 and 1976, chiefly our parade in 
June of 1976. We urge your support. 



90 



We welcome inquiries from all citizens who would like to serve on 
our subcommittees, and actively join in our Birthday Party. Please call 
Mrs. John Hill, 359-8998, Volunteer Chairwoman, or Mrs. Richard Duclow, 
359-8938. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WltUam L. HallovoeXl 

JameA T. \Aoynikan 

Co-Chairmen of 325th Anniversary 

and Special Bicentennial Committee 

Mcuvld M. BuAke. 

VaaZlne. CoidXeA 

BaAbafia Cftonln 

RobeJvt E. Voole.y 

Ralph C. Good, Jk. 

VauLlne. M. GouakeA 

Be.veAly L. HalloweJUL 

Jokn Ha/in&y, , resigned 

Votiothy Kane. 

Skvvte.y Maple* 

ktida 8. IkyeXte. 

Edwa/id A. Otting 

Va&vlcsLa Rloux. 

HichaeZ TammeAo 



91 



THE TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

After several years of necessary planning, the residents of 
Medfield can finally see visible progress regarding vocational-technical 
educational opportunities in our area. The major preliminary steps 
required prior to actual construction have been accomplished during 
the year 1974. 

In late January, this committee appointed Kenneth F. Custy as 
Superintendent-Director, the first full-time staff position. He has 
had considerable experience in the planning for and administration of 
two other regional vocational schools. His first task was to conduct 
surveys, industrial and educational, throughout the district commun- 
ities in an effort to identify program and enrollment needs. 

In May, upon the recommendation of the Architect & Site Sub- 
Committee, this school district entered into contract with Day & 
Zimmerman Associates of Philadelphia, Pa,, who immediately commenced 
preliminary design planning. 

A sixty-acre site in the Town of Franklin was selected in August 
after serious consideration of five other potential sites. It is in 
the area referred to as Bright Hill and is close to the intersection 
of Routes 495 and 140. The site offers ready access to sewerage and 
all utilities. 

In September, the Town of Seekonk was officially accepted into 
the Tri-County Regional School District. This was a result of a vote 
of acceptance by the then eight member communities and necessitated a 
reapportionment of all costs, current and projected. William J. 
Drohan, Jr. was appointed as the Seekonk member of this committee. 

The bond issue election was held in each of the nine towns on 
October 30, and this committee was authorized to incur debt up to 
fifteen million dollars for the purpose of constructing and equip- 
ping the Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School. A 
second article requesting the sum of six hundred thousand dollars for 
the purpose of including a swimming pool was turned down. 

During all of this time the educational specifications were 
being developed. It was decided that the school will serve fifteen 
hundred day students, and the following full time programs were 
planned: 



92 



Technical Occupations: 
Commercial Art 
Graphic Arts 
Electronics 
Data Processing 
Technical Drafting 



Service Occupations: 
Distributive Education 
Child Care 
Cosmetology 
Food Trades 
Health Services 
Home Economics 



Construction Occupations: Machine Occupations: 
Carpentry & Cabinetmaking Auto Body 
General Construction Auto Repair 

Electricity Machine Shop 

Metal Fabrication Plant Maintenance 

HVAC & Sheet Metal 
Painting & Decorating 
Plumbing & Hydronic Heating 
Air Conditioning & Refrigeration 

In addition, it is the committee's intent to provide evening 
adult programs in three general categories: trade extension, trade 
preparatory, and practical arts. 

Recognizing that such important educational planning is best 
served by the participation of many knowledgeable residents, various 
committees have been established to actively engage in such planning. 
At this writing, one hundred and eight advisory committee members have 
been enlisted to assist in the planning for equipment and layout in 
twenty- three trade training programs. The Superintendents of Schools 
in each of the nine communities have established a Superintendents' 
Advisory Council to work with our Superintendent-Director for the 
purpose of coordinating career development programs at all grade 
levels. Some employment and personnel managers in the area have 
already communicated with us regarding possible student cooperative 
and/or work-experience programs. Such interest and enthusiam has 
been, to say the least, encouraging and we are indeed appreciative of 
that support. 

Tri-County will open in September, 1977 with an enrollment of 
seven hundred and fifty students in grades nine and ten. 

Respectfully submitted, 



A/uthuA C. HiXJbnan, Chairman 
Tkomai A. P/iocop, Medfield 



93 



THE SCHOOL PLANNING AND BUILDING COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The following is the report of the School Planning & Building 
Committee for the year ending December 31, 1974: 

The space problem in our schools, particularly at the secondary 
level has not been solved. The high school is in an overcrowed condi- 
tion, particularly in the areas of IMC, science laboratories, music, 
gymnasium, health, and administration. 

A report of the separate Space Needs Committee is awaited to 
further explore alternative means of relieving this overcrowdedness. 
An expected student increase of approximately thirty-five students in 
September of 1975 will place an additional burden upon this school. 

Memorial School has a present population of 406 pupils, Dale Street 
has 430 youngsters, Wheelock's population is 660, the junior high school 
is at 724, and the senior high has 653 pupils. While student population 
is holding stable at the elementary level, the previous large population 
bulge is moving into the secondary level and causing the overcrowded 
problems. If the present school population figures are not affected by 
outside influences such as new home building, then the next five or six 
years appear most crucial for our building committee. As this bulge 
moves through our secondary schools this is where hard, logical reason- 
ing must take place, as we debate building, additions, renovations, 
or a hold-fast philosophy. 

In June of 1973, the School Committee, and the School Planning 
and Building Committee requested bids on the installation of new roofs 
on Memorial School (School Committee appropriation) and the Senior High 
School (School Planning & Building Committee appropriation) . The 
successful bidder was Leonard Lacey of Eagle Peak Road, Pascoag, Rhode 
Island. 

Work commenced at the Senior High School in July of 1973. The 
roofs were completely stripped of all tar, gravel, and insulation. New 
insulation was laid in place and three layers of 55-pound felt with 
adhesive between the layers was placed to form a complete bond. Over 
this a coat of sealer was hand mopped and a final coat machine sprayed 
to complete the job. Twenty- two scuppers were cut into the edges of the 
roofs and downspouts were installed to prevent ponding of water on these 
flat roofs and to eliminate future leaks as a result of high water 
build-up. Flat roofs are a bane in New England weather and have not 
been installed on the junior high or the Wheelock schools. 



94 



The jobs were completed in October 1974. 

We extend our appreciation to the School Committee, the administra- 
tion and the faculty of our schools and to the townspeople for their 
aid, advice and support. 

Respectfully submitted, 



RaZpk PaAmag-ianz. , Chairman 
VavsLd R. Ivzaaovi 
VhULLp J. BuAA 
RobzAt S. CapzAA 
yio/iyzltm M. VaJtzanici 



THE MEDFIELD - NORWOOD MENTAL HEALTH AND 
RETARDATION AREA BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Medfield - Norwood Mental Health and Retardation Area Board 
of the Department of Mental Health consists of 21 citizens appointed 
by the Governor to act as representatives of their communities in issues 
regarding the comprehensive delivery of mental health and retardation 
services. 

The Area Board representatives from Medfield for 1974-1975 are: 

Dr. Norine Johnson, 55 Sawmill Lane, 359-4065 
Mrs. Margaret Vasaturo 1 Emerson Road, 359-4320 

For questions or suggestions regarding mental health and retarda- 
tion services, call your Area Board representative, or, the Area Office 
in Medfield at 326-4741, or, 359-4312 extension 222. 

Respectfully submitted, 

The Med field-Norwood Mental 
Health and Retardation 
Area Board 



95 



JURY LIST 



Paul F. Alvarado 
Beverly J. Anderson 
Ralph A. Baker, Jr. 
Philip D. Bartlett 
James R. Bassett 
Leland N. Berg 
Marion M. Blanchard 
John E. Booth 
Robert Bowker 
Nancy Bravo 
Myron R. Brennan 
Robert H. Brown 
Sandra Lee Buchanan 
Mary D. Burks 
Donald L. Bush 
Donald R. Christy 
Phyllis Cohen 
David F. Cook 
William C. Cook 
William Cooley 
James R. Coolman 
Linda Davis 
Clifford G. Doucette 
Frank N. Duest 
Leonard R. Eakin 
Mae A. Emery 
Walter B. Eppich 
Ann E. Ferguson 
Stanley C. Fisher 
John T. Gerah 
Kenneth A. Fowler 
Charles E. Glew 
John C. Goddard 
William C. Gould 
Norman A. Gray, Sr. 
Cheryl A. Grover 
David R. Guenette 
Fred A. Hallock 
Olga M. Harrington 
Muriel F. Harris 
Patrick S. Harris 
John T. Hanson 
June B. Harrison 
Dorothy M. Hildebrand 
Carol A. Hilpert 
George W. Hinkley, Jr. 
Paul E. Hinkley 
Peter S. Hinkley 



2 Evergreen Way 
7 Lowell Mason Rd. 
36 Frairy St. 
36 Partridge Rd . 

16 Snyder Rd. 
9 Woodfall Rd. 

32 Flint Locke Ln. 
20 Marlyn Rd. 
169 South St. 
336 Main St. 
152 North St. 
45 Spring St. 
63 Pleasant St. 
39 Vinald Rd . 
12 Carmen Cir. 
2 Maplewood Rd. 

7 Country Way 
78 Adams St. 

17 Knollwood Rd . 
282 South St. 

19 Emerson Rd. 
38 Cypress St. 
17 Pleasant St. 
32 Phillip St. 
11A Miller St. 
49 Cypress St. 
9 Cross St. 
11 Woodfall Rd. 
19 Phillip St. 
22 Knollwood Rd. 
123 Harding St. 

24 Ledgetree Rd . 
16 Woodfall Rd. 
14 Evergreen Way 
6 Clark Rd. 

25 Frairy St. 
28 Cross St. 
4 Elm St. 

22 Elm St. 
11 Partridge Rd. 
198 Causeway St. 
34 Blacksmith Dr. 
60 Orchard St. 
66 Pine St. 
1 Tamarack Rd . 
84 Harding St. 
106 Harding St. 

8 Pheasant Rd. 



Regional Program Director 

Dental Assistant 

Machine Operator 

Mech. Engineering Mgr. 

Vice President 

Printer 

Accounting Clerk 

Consultant 

Treasurer-Consultant 

Cafeteria Baker 

Maintenance Electronics 

Builder 

Store Manager 

Housewife 

Ass't. Department Mgr. 

General Manager 

Housewife 

Carpenter 

Vice President 

Carpet Layer 

District Sales Mgr. 

Housewife 

Foreman 

Web Pressman 

Stable Worker 

Sales Clerk 

Service Man 

Housewife 

Welder 

Assistant Secretary 

Development Engineer 

Manager 

Manager 

Director 

Lands caper 

Assembler 

Student 

Project Engineer 

Registered Nurse 

Housewife 

Consultant 

District Mgr. 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Power Plant Engineer 

Driver 

Steam Fireman 



96 



Raymond 0. Hollis 
Ann Lee Howell 
Edith C. Howlett 
Leona R. Hurd 
Joy L. Iafolla 
Herbert E. Johnson 
Charles H. Justice 
Ruth M. Justice 
Joseph M. Keefe 
Robert D. Kenney 
Joseph J. Keris 
Ernest E. Knotts 
Ruth L. Kobel 
Marcia K. Kringel 
Stephen D. Kristof 
Malcolm H. Leggett 
Stephen M. Logsdon 
Malcolm K. MacDonald 
Robert F. Maples 
Warren J. Marcus 
Benjamin A. Martin 
Leo J. McCabe 
Arthur L. McCarty 
David A. McGinnis 
Charles D. McHale 
Roy A. McQuillan 
Lucille S. Meagher 
Carl J. Mellea 
Richard Middlesworth 
Margaret A. Munger 
Olaf R. Ness 
David J. Noonan 
Robert T. Norton 
John L. Olsen 
Fritz R. Palaz 
Muriel C. Palumbo 
Joseph R. Parker, Jr. 
Alden H. Pember 
Harold E. Plough 
Howard A. Powers 
Mary F. Powers 
Jack E. Reed 
Elizabeth Rhoads 
John M. Rhodes 
Hanson C. Robbins 
Florence E. Roberts 
Ronald Robertson 
George L. Robinson 
Barbara S. Rudisill 
Robert E. Ryall 
Leo G. Shiels 
Thomas V. Sweeney 
Stephen H. Teague 



67 Blacksmith Dr. 

22 Arnold Dr. 

23 Pleasant St. 

3 Westview Rd. 
58 Frairy St. 
26 Pine St. 
215 South St. 
215 South St. 
10 Arnold Dr. 

4 Pilgrim Ln. 
70 Pleasant St. 

16 Spring Valley Rd. 

15 Longmeadow Rd . 
119 Granite St. 

23 Belknap Rd. 
18 Phillip St. 

24 Emerson Rd. 

14 Spring Valley Rd. 

3 Came lot Ln. 
52 Spring St. 

12 Pine Grove Rd. 

16 Lantern Ln. 
158 North St. 
28 Phillip St. 

58 Blacksmith Dr. 

14 Miller St. 

6 Stonybrook Rd. 
28 Hillcrest Road 
41 Colonial Rd. 

1 Steven Lane 

4 Black Pine Rd. 

7 Castle Ave. 

24 Charlesdale Rd. 
12 Winter St. 
9 Penobscot St. 

17 West St. 

8 Metacomet St. 
326 Main St. 

28 Snyder Rd. 
22 Philip St. 
3 Nebo Street 

77 South St. 
35 Brook St. 

29 Pine St. 
72 Elm St. 

15 Miller St. 

5 Carmen Cir. 
29 West St. 

3 Lakewood Dr. 

6 Wildewood Rd. 
60 Adams St. 

78 Harding St. 
20 Dale St. 



Manager 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Secretary 

Real Estate Salesman 

Regional Representative 

Library Aide 

Paymaster 

Salesman 

Tool Designer 

Director Accounts Rec. 

Medical Secretary 

Housewife 

Golf Course Superint. 

Insurance Underwriter 

Program Manager 

Managing Director 

Marketing Manager 

Group Underwriting 

Sales Representative 

Salesman 

Sales Representative 

President 

Sales Manager 

Project Engineer 

Housewife, Secretary 

Civil Engineer 

Manager 

Housewife, Artist 

Owner-Coffee Service 

Mechanic 

Press Room Supervisor 

Dir. Special Projects 

Advertising Manager 

Housewife 

Silversmith, Self Empl. 

Retired 

Sr. Systems Engineer 

Engineer 

Office Supervisor 

District Manager 

Secretary 

Executive Administ. 

Investment Banker 

Housewife 

Manager, Personnel 

Sales Representative 

Housewife 

Agent Insurance 

Salesman 

Retired 

Carpenter 



97 



Horace M. Thayer 
Richard P. Thompson 
Robert T. Toubeau 
Henry J. Vasaturo 
Nancy A. Weir 
Arthur E. Wills 
Constance J. Yena 



35 West Mill St. 
18 Orchard St. 
52 Brook St. 
119 South St. 
581 Main St. 
56 Philip St. 
43 Pine St. 



Maintenance Supervisor 

Salesman 

Utility Sander 

Lumber Salesman 

Housewife 

Retired 

Housewife 



98 



PUBLIC SCHOOL 



REPORTS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1974 



99 



Report of the School Committee 



During 1974 the School Committee has gone through a transitionary 
period of adjustment due to the resignation of Mrs. Sonya Siders and 
Mr. Everett Fuller. We commend their service to the community and their 
dedication to the professional growth of the Medfield School System. 

The evaluation and analysis of our school program has been an on- 
going function of your School Committee for 1974. Emphasis was placed 
on the school curriculum and on the fiscal disbursement of our budget 
toward quality education. An examination of the leadership within our 
school system was given high priority by the Committee. The year 1974 
saw the promotion of Mr. Tassos Filledes, the former Science Coordina- 
tor, to the position of High School Principal. Mr. Kevin Flynn was 
added to the staff as our Director of Chapter 766 and Special Services. 

The school population enrollment has demonstrated a trend toward 
leveling off at the elementary schools. However, our Junior and Senior 
High Schools face crowded conditions in the years ahead. Special area 
classrooms are simply not adequate for our needs. Core facilities are 
inadequate at the high school in the following areas: cafeteria, art 
facilities, library, science laboratories, shop areas, gymnasium and 
administration. The Committee has identified this situation as an area 
requiring its attention in 1975. 

Following student, administration, teacher, parent, and community 
analysis and recommendations, the Committee incorporated policy deci- 
sions in 1974. Vandalism and equal opportunities for girls and boys 
were examined and implemented within our school system. We also began 
the study of drug useage and possible policy positions regarding it. 
This work necessitates careful legal advice as well. We anticipate 
final action in this area in 1975. We are especially proud of the 
Student Advisory Committee that attends our monthly meetings and is 
actively communicating and incorporating its views in these areas of 
student concern. 

The Medfield volunteer assistance programs including A.V.I.S. and 
others, and the booster clubs are invaluable to our academic and 
activity programs. Through the effort of volunteers, we have been able 
to expand our creative offerings in the intellectual and extracurricular 
areas for our students. 

This report would be incomplete if we did not recognize, with 
appreciation, the countless townspeople who have helped in various ways 
to make the Medfield Public Schools a quality school experience for our 
children. Our school support personnel form another integral part of 
our system. Their dedication and conscientious service is sometimes 
taken for granted. The school system would not be as efficiently 
administered without the following capable personnel: bus drivers, 
traffic supervisors, cafeteria personnel, custodian and maintenance 



100 



personnel, athletic staff, school secretaries and health staff. 

The following reports of the various School Administrators detail 
the progress of the Medfield Schools in the past year. 

VluJLvp J. BufiA, ChcuAman 
Vaivn I. Aiutin, M 1,0,2, CkaOunan 
TkomaA IhdivJWvLz, 

R<lco siding S2.cA.2XaA.1j 
Ev2.A2JX TuJLIza, 

TIvwlvica.oJL S2.CA2.tOA.if 
John C. Rudu>-iIZ, Jn.. 




School Committee Members (standing) David Hansen, Dawn Austin and 
Philip Burr, (seated) Thomas McMurtrie and John Rudisill, Jr. 



Report of the Superintendent of Schools 



To the Chairman and Members of the School Committee: 

I am pleased to submit my third annual report which is the twenty- 
third in a series of annual reports of the Superintendent of Schools 
in Medfield. 



101 



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110 



School Lunch Program 



Avery, Dorothy E. 
Hallett, Elaine 
Boulter, Jean L. 
Catenacci, Rita 
Coffone, Nancy 
Collins, Marsha A. 
Dick, Doris R. 
Flynn, Janet 
Ganley, Phyllis A. 
Gallagher, Roxane 
Grover, Mildred H. 
Horgan, Mary E. 
Howard, Ruth D. 
Hutt, Mary Rita 
Ingraham, Dorothy M. 
Leslie, Patricia E. 
O'Donnell, Lenora M. 
Oglesby, Loretta 
Papsis, Gloria A. 
Petersen, Leonora M. 
Simonaitis, Ann H. 
Sloan, Marjorie 
Smith, Jean M. 
Stewart, Alice A. 
Szylkonis, Irene F. 
Thayer, E. Ruth 
Wenz, Shirley 



Director 

Clerk 

Dale Street 

Memorial 

High School 

Junior High 

Junior High 

Junior High(Mgr.) 

Dale Street 

Wheelock 

Dale Street (Mgr.) 

Wheelock (Mgr.) 

Junior High 

High School 

Wheelock 

Dale Street 

Dale Street 

High School , 

High School 

Wheelock 

Junior High 

Memorial (Mgr.) 

Junior High 

High School (Mgr.) 

Junior High 

Memorial 

High School 



Custodians 



Pritoni, Harold F. 
Boudreau, Joseph I. 
Boudreau, William F. 
Bridges, Frank W. 
Capocci, William L. 
Chevarie, Paul F. 
DiNardo, John 
Giard, Arnold U. 
Grover, John T. 
Hallowell, Vincent D. 
Kilmer, Howard 



Director of Buildings and Grounds 
Groundskeeper 
Wheelock 
Dale Street 
Memorial 
Dale Street 
Groundskeeper 
Junior High 
Maintenance 
Wheelock 
High School 



111 



LaPlante, Thomas 
Lori, John 
McCormack, John D. 
Motes, Carlis E. 
Suereth, Eric T. 
Sweet, Reginald 0. 
Timmerman, Joseph 
Walls, Thomas R. 



High School 
Maintenance 
Memorial 
Dale Street 
Wheelock 
Junior High 
High School 
High School 



Personnel Changes 



New Personnel 



Appointment Effective 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE 



King, Emilie A. 



December 



SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



Filledes, Tassos P. 
Galeucia, Hope 
Kelleher, Clare 
Modica, Barbara 
Noble, Judith 
Potts, Eva 
Smith, Julian 
Thomas, Kathleen 
Villani, Donna 



(Appointed High School Principal) 



September 
February 
October 
September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
September 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



Birchell, Deborah 
Dugger, Rozann 
Rossini, John 
Zive, Cynthia 



September 
September 
September 
September 



MEMORIAL 



Higgins, Anna 
McCarthy, Barbara 



September 
September 



WHEELOCK 



Kristof, Ann 
Spierdowis, Mary 



September 
September 



112 



SPECIAL NEEDS 



Flynn, Kevin J. 

Papagno, Nancy I. 

Barrett, Joan 

Pallis, Sylvia A. 

Kallio, Patricia S. 

Galeucia, Hope M. (Transferred from High School) 



August 
September 
October 
September 
September 
September 



CUSTODIANS 



Belcher, Blair 
Mott, Harold 
Walls, Thomas 



November 
September 
September 



Terminations 



SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



Johnston, Russell H. 
Costello, Judith W. 
Goodman, Sylvia 
Haley, John P. 
Howard, Andrew J. 
Knowles, M. Jewel 
Mulcahy, Peter F. 
Ward, Gwendolyn H. 



Jr 



August 

March 

September 

June 

June 

June 

August 

June 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



D 1 Alessandro, Ann L. 
Hocutt, Gladys R. 
Hoffman, Janice M. 
Packer, Sibyl 
Smith, Karen 



June 

June 

June 

January 

March 



DALE STREET 



Rosenthal, Deborah R. 
Valente, Ronald A. 



June 
June 



113 



MEMORIAL 



Jones, Connie S. 
Scagnelli, Diane 
Wood, Joan 



June 
June 
June 



WHEELOCK 



Stewart, Jean A. 
Waterman, Helen 



October 
June 



CUSTODIANS 



Iafolla, Ercole 
Sweet , Arthur 



March 
December 




Assistant Superintendent of Schools James H. Morris reviews budget 
figures with his secretary Mrs. Ruth McCarthy. 



114 



Enrollment Commentary 



Introduction : In recent years much attention has been given by 
school authorities and other citizens to further construction needs for 
classrooms and support facilities for the Medfield Public Schools. At 
the heart of our possible space needs has been the question, "Are our 
school facilities adequate both in teaching stations and in specialized 
support areas for our current enrollment and at least the next five year 
projected enrollment?" The review of enrollments during the past nine 
years (see below) clearly suggests that further increases in student 
enrollment are unlikely during the next five or six years. The number 
of teaching stations (classrooms) throughout the school system does 
appear to school authorities to be adequate currently. 

Study has begun on the support areas essential for modern school 
programs in Medfield. There is a need for expansion of the Senior High 
School Instructional Materials Center (Library). Further documentation 
is necessary, of course, but most support areas at the High School are 
more suited for a student body of U00 to 500 pupils than the current 6^h 
or projected 675 pupils. 

All schools are operating at maximum utilization of classroom and 
support area spaces, although the junior high school may be able to 
absorb 25-^0 more pupils. Our expanding Learning Disabilities program, 
essential under the law (Chapter 766) for students with special needs, 
requires one classroom space at each school. The Senior High School can 
handle as many as 720 pupils at a maximum by dividing the three largest 
classroom spaces to double the teaching stations in those areas. How- 
ever, the need for expanded or improved facilities for Science labora- 
tories, a Language laboratory, Industrial Arts and Shop rooms, Business 
Education rooms, etc. has been spoken of by Medfield educators and the 
School Committee for the last several years. Support areas such as 
Library, Guidance, Health, Administration offices, Cafeteria, and 
Athletic facilities are presently very strained. They were built for 
560 pupils as the original maximum enrollment for your High School. 

Tables and commentary on Medfield Public School enrollments follow: 



115 



Table I: Nine Year Comparison of Enrollments, October 1 
66-67 67-68 68-69 69-70 70-71 71-72 72-73 73-74 74-75 



SPED 


9 


(10) 


10 


12 


14 


16 


12 


11 


17 


Kg. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


181 


183 


1 


227 


228 


243 


235 


229 


247 


221 


203 


201 


2 


200 


228 


227 


235 


220 


223 


240 


212 


205 


3 


187 


210 


249 


233 


233 


232 


224 


218 


218 


4 


211 


195 


225 


259 


235 


238 


246 


209 


215 


5 


183 


209 


204 


237 


248 


236 


249 


251 


210 


6 


182 


193 


219 


222 


236 


253 


237 


247 


253 


7 


173 


189 


197 


228 


227 


244 


251 


230 


250 


8 


157 


179 


188 


210 


234 


236 


248 


242 


227 


9 


146 


165 


178 


194 


209 


240 


235 


233 


235 


10 


111 


145 


160 


177 


201 


207 


232 


231 


220 


11 


115 


115 


148 


172 


165 


193 


203 


221 


227 


12 


88 


113 


116 


155 


169 


149 


183 


188 


207 



Totals 1989 2179 2364 2569 2620 2714 2781 2877 
Comments on the 1974-75 column above: 



2868 



1. The incoming first grade class for 1974-75 was 13 students 
larger than the outgoing graduating class of the previous 
year 1973-74. 

2. The kindergarten program in its second year enrolled 183 
pupils compared with 181 at this level last year. These 
figures represent approximately 91-93% of the eligible students. 

3. However, the total number of pupils in grades 1-11 in 1973-74 
decreased by 30 as they became grades 2-12 in 1974-75. This is 
an average loss of 2.7 students at each grade level, or 1.2% 
decrease. 

4. The over-all enrollment in 1974-75 decreased by 9 students or 
0.31%. 

Table II: Comparison of Enrollments 

Comparing Grades Comparing Grade 1 Comparing 
2-12 with 1-11 with Preceding Total 
in Preceding Year Graduating Class Enrollments 



Year to Year 

66-67 to 67-68 
67-68 to 68-69 
68-69 to 69-70 
69-70 to 70-71 
70-71 to 71-72 
71-72 to 72-73 
72-73 to 73-74 

73-74 to 74-75 



49 


140 




190 


55 


130 




185 


84 


119 




205 


-25 


74 




51 


14 


78 




94 


-1 


72 




67 


-104 


20 




-85 (plus Kg. of 






181 


for a net of +96) 


-30 


13 




-9 



116 



Comments on above: 

1. During the years 66-67 to 69-70 more students were transferring to 
Medfield than were leaving. During the years 69-70 to 72-73 the 
gains and losses due to transferring students were about even. From 
72-73 to73-7*+ a sharp reversal occurred as fewer students trans- 
ferred to Medfield than those who left. From 73-7 1 * to 7^-75 this 
loss continued, but at a significantly lower rate. 

2. The actual number of first graders during the past eight years has 
been consistently in the 220' s to 2Uo's, but in 1973-7*+ and again 
this year the figure dropped to just over 200. Meanwhile, the size 
of the Senior class has been increasing from 88 to 207. Together 
these factors have meant increases at a decreasing rate as follows: 

a. The incoming first grade classes were 130 pupils larger than 
the preceding year's Senior class from 66-67 to 69-70. 

b. Incoming first grade classes were 75 pupils larger from 69-70 
to 72-73. 

c. But from 72-73 to 7*+-75 another significant decrease in the rate 
of enrollment increase occurred as only 17 more entered first 
grade than were in the previous Senior class. 

3. The trends in both 1. and 2. above have been to reduce the rate of 
increase during the past eight years. A decrease in enrollment 
occurred in 1973-7*+ of 85 students - although it was blurred by the 
addition of l8l Kindergarten pupils. Finally, in 197*+-75 an actual 
decrease of 9 students establishes the first decrease in enrollment 
in recent history. 

Analysis and Projections 

1. Because of the drop in the birth rate it is likely the incoming 
first grade classes for the next three to five years will be 
slightly smaller than during the six year period from 1966-67 to 
1972-73. This will likely be the case even if the town continues 
to add 40 to 60 new homes a year which is its present rate of 
growth. Thus, no significant increase or decrease can be foreseen 
at this important entry level to our school system. 

If first grade enrollment do hold steady at about 200 to 220 they 
will equal the graduating classes in the next three to five years 
and no significant increase or decrease will occur in total student 
enrollment because of these factors % 

2. It would appear that any increases in the student body, grades 2 
through 12, have been caused by new home construction. During the 
course of the past eight years , enrollments would have decreased in 
grades 2 through 12 IN EVERY INSTANCE but for new home construction. 
The enrollment loss this year of 30 suggests this out-transferring 
loss pattern is still continuing, but at a moderate and more 
predictable level than last- year's uni'que -loss of 10*4 students. 



117 



3. Thus, we can expect no increases in the total kindergarten through 
grade 12 student enrollment over the next three to five years. A 
careful watch must be made on out- and in-transferring students for 
the grades 2 to 12 group, as any reductions here would mean actual 
reductions in total school enrollments. This prime factor reflects 
the size of incoming families to Medfield, which in turn is a 
result of many economic and social influences. It also is based 
upon the current level of Uo to 60 new homes per year. 

During the past four years comparisons of grades 2-12 with preceding 
year's 1-11 reveal that grades 3, k, 5> 6, and 7 generally increase 
their membership by 1 pupil per grade year to year, but grades 8, 

9, 10, 11, and 12 have been suffering reductions of h plus pupils 
per grade plus the "normal" attrition of about 10 students at grade 
12. Grade 2 has also experienced consistent losses of about k 
pupils due in large part to non-promotion of some first graders each 
year. 

In addition, the new Brook Street Housing project is expected to 
result in an addition of approximately 20 new students at the 1-7 
grade levels. 

Projecting these figures for 1975-76 indicate we may expect an over- 
all pupil enrollment reduction of approximately fifteen. 

h. The present grades six through eleven are our largest classes. The 
Junior High School is large enough to handle these classes satis- 
factorily. The Senior High is badly cramped. Enrollments, based 
upon these class sizes, appear likely to approach or surpass 700 
pupils from 1977-78 through 1980-81. 

Fortunately, the new vocational technical school will open in 
September 1977 at grades 9 and 10 and can accept 78 Medfield pupils 
In 1978, grades 9» 10, and 11 can handle 117 pupils. In 1979 and 
beyond the quota will be 156 pupils. Thus, the worst of the enroll- 
ment pressures will thus be lessened, with the effect that grades 

10, 11, and 12 will likely peak at about 675 pupils throughout the 
1975-1978 and then taper down to 575 pupils from 1978-1981. 

As noted above, teaching stations can be sufficient for these 
numbers. But the quality of these classrooms in specialized areas 
needs improvement. Of equal import, support areas for this many 
pupils and continually improving program needs require expansion 
and improvement . 

5. Enrollment projections - The above review of the enrollments during 
the past nine years clearly suggests that further increases in 
student enrollments are unlikely in the near future. I_f construc- 
tion should increase to the 100 family units a_ year level , then 
enrollments would again be on the rise at all grade levels. 
Economic conditions would seem to deny this as a lively occurrence 
in the next few years, however. 



118 



Special Funding 



The Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 19^5 , Public Law 
89-10, Title I funded $15,l8l to a summer school program held at the 
Dale Street School involving primarily from the Memorial and Dale Street 
Schools, plus a few from Wheelock School. The growing Federal emphasis 
in these programs is to provide relatively large sums of money for 
relatively few children in order to make significant educational gains 
for those in need - especially at the pre-school and primary grade 
levels. Children in Grades 1 through 5 were served by this project. 
The Wheelock attendance area as a whole was again ruled ineligible as a 
primary target group, and this will likely be the case in the future. 

A small Title I Year-round program has been funded using volunteer 
mothers as tutors at our three elementary schools. $1,000 in Federal 
funds have been used to purchase materials to meet the instructional 
needs of students. 

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Title II, funded $U,868, 
for library materials. In addition, Medfield was fortunate to receive 
two special project grants amounting to $5,000: $2,500 for Reading at 
Dale Street and $2,500 for Science at the Junior High. 

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Title III, directly 
funded four projects in the Medfield Public Schools by providing 
services valued at $6,000. These projects were: 

. An in-service course for teachers in affective and humanistic 

techniques and considerations. 
. An in-service course and action oriented program entitled, 

"A Program for Parent Counseling." 
. An in-service summer workshop in communication skills for 

teachers. 
. An in-service action oriented course to train guidance 

counselors in group counseling techniques. 

Under Public Law Q6h , Title III, N.D.E.A. , Medfield received 
$5,996.15 in reimbursements for two Reading projects and $1,106.^9 
for a Science project. 

Medfield has received a Corning grant of $2,500 to purchase a 
Wang Calculator for the Science Department at the High School. 



119 



Acknowledgments 



We continue to appreciate the cooperation shown the schools by the 
Town Officials and their staffs, the Departments of Police, Fire, High- 
way, Trees and Water. 

The Town and students benefit from the high quality of both 
professional and non-certificated employees who have chosen to work for 
the Medfield Public Schools. A cooperative spirit, a high quality of 
work, and a concern to be of assistance to the Town's youth truly 
characterize all groups of school system employees - cafeteria, 
custodial, secretarial, and teacher aide workers; teacher, counselor, 
supervisor, administrative personnel; and the many volunteers who give 
so generously of their time and talent. 

Assistant Superintendent James II. Morris and the office staff of 
Virginia Kerr, Mary Shugrue, Ruth McCarthy, Selma Doerr, and Emilie 
King each deserve special thanks for their tireless efforts - often 
times under pressures and stress. 

Citizen involvement in the schools continues to increase as 
parents recognize the sincere feelings of the professional staff for 
seeking to communicate more often and with more quality to parents 
about their children. We also have a steady corps of volunteers 
which reflects both the willingness of parents to assist students and 
teachers and the increasing needs identified by teachers and principals 
for such services. We are grateful for these civic minded citizens of 
Medfield. 

The School Committee has again had a busy and full year in ful- 
filling its leadership role for the schools and the community. I can 
think of no more important civic task than that of serving the 
community as a School Committee member. I am pleased to work with such 
dedicated people as all of those listed above. They have accomplished 
much during the years, and together we will accomplish more. 

Respectfully submitted, 

oViuce C. VudUlfah. 

Superintendent of Schools 



120 



Report of the Memorial Elementary School 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I am pleased to submit my annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1974. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

Significant shifts in enrollment resulted in some organizational 
changes as school opened in September. Grade one enrollment increased 
11% over the previous year with a corresponding decrease of 18% in 
grade three. Consequently, one grade three classroom was eliminated 
and the teacher-pupil ratio in grade one increased from 1-22 to 1-25. 
The school experienced no turnover in professional classroom personnel. 
New personnel did^ however, fill two Kindergarten Aide positions at the 
opening of school, September 1974. 

PROGRAM 

The elimination of a third grade classroom has allowed space for a 
newly organized Learning Resource Room. Under the direction of the 
Learning and Speech specialists, this center is staffed with nine 
trained volunteers tutoring children with specific needs in the develop- 
mental skills areas. 

The total language development program of the school has been 
enhanced by the use of two student teachers and increased parent par- 
ticipation in therapy sessions. With a large number of young children 
enrolled in our primary grades, this area has been a focal point of 
staff involvement and in-service education. 

Parent volunteers continue to contribute overwhelmingly to the 
functioning of Memorial School. Presently, more than sixty-five 
volunteers are contributing on a regular basis each week. Their par- 
ticipation includes tasks in many areas; clerical, tutorial, library 
work, and classroom assistance. Additionally, many more are performing 
valuable services for special occasion events and individual classroom 
activities. This participation is most welcomed and appreciated by the 
Memorial School staff. 

Plans for involvement in Medfield's historical celebration have 
been incorporated into the Social Studies curriculum. Staff members 
have prepared an excellent unit of study on the History of Medfield. 
The use of study prints, puppetry, tape recordings and other audio- 
visual materials have made presentations more appropriate to the primary 
grade level. 

We continue to strive for articulation of our program to the 
community we serve through conferences, discussion evenings, home 
visits, open house, and American Education Week activities. 

121 



The cooperation and support of the Memorial School staff, parents 
and volunteers, Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent, School 
Committee, and other school personnel is noteworthy and sincerely 
appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RuAAoZt A. Peue^eaa 

Principal 




Memorial School Principal, Russ Devereau, visits two very busy first 
graders, Robert Bond and Stephen Hartley. 



Report of the Dale Street School 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of the Dale Street School, it is my pleasure to submit 
my twelfth Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 1974. 

PROGRAMS 

Significant adjustments were made in the school hours during 
January and February due to the effects of the Energy Crisis. With the 
cooperation of students, parents and staff, the educational program was 
not adversely affected. Development and improvement of the total 



122 



program continues to be a major objective of the staff. Inservice time 
was spent on improving communication between home/school and student/ 
teacher, curriculum revision, material development, and evaluation 
procedures. The program of parent tutors for Reading and Learning Dis- 
abilities was expanded. 

SCHOOL ACTIVITIES 

1. Students continue to participate in large numbers in the intra- 
mural programs. 

2. Music and Art are two areas in which many children are active. 
The Art work of the students is exhibited in school and at the Annual 
Art and Music Festival. The two bands and the two choruses performed 
for their classmates at assemblies and for the parents at the Art and 
Music Festival. 

3. Curriculum oriented Field Trips were held for all classes. 




Sixth grade volunteers help Principal Alan. Belcher and his secretary 
Dorothy Donahue. 



SCHOOL - COMMUNITY 

The community's participation in the Dale Street School educational 
program is welcomed. This year some examples of school and community 
cooperation were: 

1. Formation of a Parents' Advisory council to the Principal. 

2. Community speakers on a variety of subjects in different 
school curriculum areas. 



123 



3. Classroom visitation by parents. 

4. Individual grade-level Open Houses. 

5. Individual scheduled parent/ teacher conferences. 

I wish to thank the Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent, 
School Committee, the Faculty, and the citizens of Medfield for their 
cooperation and assistance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Allan K. BeZchdi 
Principal 



Report of the Ralph Wheelock School 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

The sixth annual report is being submitted from the Ralph Wheelock 
School for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1974. 

Our total enrollment remains basically the same as last year with 
four sections in each grade from K - 5 and five sections in grade 6. 
An increase in kindergarten resulted in an additional class. 

The new school hours (9:05 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.) achieved the following 
objectives: 

1. Children arrived at school and were dismissed from school in a 
short span of time. 

2. Each bus made only 1 trip. Previously all buses were making 
at least 2 trips. 

3. More time before school was utilized for meetings and confer- 
ences. 

4. Band and chorus time was lengthened. 

5. More time was provided in the morning for children who need 
extra help. 

During the past year, 13 teachers from the Ralph Wheelock School 
had participated in a professional development course which was de- 
signed to help them in developing an ideal classroom environment. 
Introduction of a variety of skills and techniques and the fostering of 

124 



better communication between teacher and pupil were emphasized. The 
course had been warmly received by teachers who had noted some positive 
effects in the classroom. 

The current guidance programs such as "DUSO" (Developing an 
Understanding of Self and Others) and "Magic Circle" group discussions, 
further enhance the student's self-image and increase an awareness of 
his/her effect on others. Students have an opportunity to engage in 
individual or group counseling sessions. Parents and teachers meet with 
the counselor to discuss common concerns regarding a child's total 
development. Career awareness program is incorporated within the social 
studies curriculum thereby increasing decision making skills. Guidance 
strives to meet individual needs in conjunction with other specialty 
areas. 

In September, Project Help expanded to fourteen tutors who attended 
a twenty-five hour training program directed by Dorothy Rockwood, 
Reading Specialist. 

Trained tutors now provide classroom, small group and one-to-one 
tutoring in the areas of reading, math, learning disabilities, and 
handwriting to approximately sixty children. 

Our first attempt to schedule conferences at the intermediate level 
enabled us to confer with many parents and also to give them an oppor- 
tunity to meet with teachers on request. It was our objective to 
improve home/school communication and to give parents more insight into 
their child's progress. 

An added dimension to our physical education program was a six 
week unit on co-educational gymnastics. 

The art program included more involvement in three-dimensional 
media including paper mache ' , wood, and found objects. An important 
addition to the sixth grade curriculum is the pottery unit which re- 
sults in extensive utilization of the new pottery wheel. 

Appreciation is extended to the Superintendent, Assistant Superin- 
tendent, School Committee, Faculty, Coordinators, Volunteers, Parents, 
and all other school personnel for their support and cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ttumk J. Ho££man 
Principal 



125 




Wheelock School Principal, Frank Hoffman, discusses language arts texts 
with teachers Mary Ellen Rhodes and Mary Cauldwell. 



Report of the Junior High School 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

With pleasure I am submitting the Annual Report for the year 
ending December 31, 1974. 

Our September enrollment was 720 students distributed over three 
grade levels as follows: 

248 at grade 7, 226 at grade 8, 235 at grade 9, and 11 SPED 
students. 

Seven members of our staff participated in a Title III sponsored 
inservice program in affective education in the Spring of 1974 and six 
members participated in a similar program during the Fall of 1974. 

The Social Studies Department developed and taught a team teaching 
unit on Westward Expansion to all seventh grade students. A new 
departmental progress report was developed. New electives on the 
American Indian and Psychology are being drawn-up to be offered to 9th 
grade students for the next academic year. Special field trips were 
taken to the U.N. in New York City by 9th grade students and to 



126 



Sturbridge Village by the 7th grade. Also the restructuring of the 7th 
and 8th grade program to include both geography and history at each 
level has been completed for implementation in the 75-76 academic year. 

In the area of Industrial Arts, Mechanical Drawing and Electricity 
have been added to the 9th grade curriculum. 

More emphasis has been placed on ability grouping in the Math 
curriculum at 7th and 8th grade levels. Back to back scheduling of 
classes have allowed re-grouping of students during units of work to 
promote greater individualization in the program. 

The Music Department has developed a curriculum emphasizing con- 
temporary music as well as continuing emphasis on basic concepts and 
participation. In addition to the annual Spring Concert, a Winter 
Concert was presented. 

A new approach to orientation was initiated this past year for 7th 
grades. 7th grade students were brought in a day earlier than 8th and 
9th grade students. This provided the opportunity for students to get 
their schedules, meet their teachers, and familiarize themselves with 
the school before all students were required to be present. Parents 
were invited to attend and many took advantage of attending the opening 
day of school with their youngsters. 

The Student Council was re-organized so that all students who were 
interested could serve on the council. New committee organization per- 
mitted greater student involvement in setting policy and participation 
in many aspects of school life. 

New staff members added or as replacements for those who resigned 
include Mr. Rossini, Music; Miss Birchell, Science; Mrs. Dugger, 
Physical Education; Mrs. Gugliotta, English. 

Mrs. Anderson, English, and Mrs. Nash, Art, returned from leaves 
of absence to re-join our staff. 

I thank the Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent, School 
Committee, parent volunteers, the faculty and school personnel for their 
assistance and cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JameA W. O'ConnM 

Principal 



127 




Junior High Principal, James O'Connell, discusses library policies with 
librarian Connie Sabbag. 



Report of the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As principal of Medfield High School, I respectfully submit our 
annual report for the year ending December 31, 1974. 

The official enrollment for the High School this past fall was 654 
students, an increase of 14 students from the previous school year. 
There were a total of 193 graduates in the Class of 1974. Of these 52.4% 
went on to a four-year college; 12.5% to a two-year college; .6% to 
nursing schools; .3% to other post high school institutions; 1.5% joined 
the Armed Services, and 30% entered the vzorld of work. We are proud of 
the fact that four of our students were semi-finalists for Merit Schol- 
arship Awards competition and thirteen students received Letters of 
Commendation. 

The faculty of our school consists of fifty (50) certified pro- 
fessionals. Advanced degrees are held by 70% of the staff. 

Over this past year, our Academic Standards Committee has been 
meeting on a regular basis carefully studying our curriculum and 
academic requirements. We are attempting to upgrade our educational 



128 



standards. A proposal of recommended changes is being prepared. 

During this school year, we introduced a new portable language lab. 
This portable lab houses 30 units and can be utilized in three of our 
language rooms which have been especially adapted for this purpose. The 
purpose for this lab is to develop the oral skills of our language stu- 
dents. Approximately 300 of our students are presently taking advantage 
of this facility. 

We have reinstituted some of the extra-curricular activities which 
had been eliminated in the past and also introduced many new clubs of 
which our students have taken advantage. Our hope is that many more 
students will be able to participate in activities outside of the class- 
room. 

A system of "Teacher Advisors" was introduced at the High School. 
These "Teacher Advisors" work closely with the guidance counselors and 
Honor Society members in helping students who are having difficulty with 
their studies. 

In complying with the Massachusetts Statute, Chapter 766, a High 
School team composed of administration, faculty, guidance counselors, 
speech therapists, learning disability specialists and reading special- 
ists has been meeting on a regular basis for the purpose of evaluating 
our students. I feel that our team has been most effective in dealing 
with this new state law. 

We are extremely proud of our boy and girl athletes, our band and 
our cheerleaders who have represented our school this past year. We 
appreciate the fine support given us by the Medfield Boosters Club. 

In closing, I wish to thank the Medfield School Committee, Super- 
intendent and Assistant Superintendent, the professional staff, our 
student body and parents for the excellent support they have given me 
since my appointment last September as the new High School principal. I 
look forward to working closely with all in order that we may have a 
school community of which we can be proud. 

Respectfully submitted, 

TaA&o* P. TWLd&dh 

Principal 



129 



Graduation Exercises 

of 

Medfield High School 

Class of 1974 



GYMNASIUM 



4:00 P.M. 



SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 1974 



PROGRAM 



Processional 



Pomp and Circumstances 



Class of 1974 



Elgar 



Paul J. Kelleher 



Invocation 

The National Anthem 

Welcome 

Honor Essays 

Craig S. Harwood 

Glee Club 

If We Only Have Love 
You'll Never Walk Alone 

Presentation of Class Gift 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL BAND 
Douglas Godfrey, Director 
MARSHALS 

Douglas J. Wisniewski 
The Reverend Lawrence M. Ryan 
Medfield High School Band 
David S. Battisti, President, Class of 1974 



Karen M. Higgs 



Jacques Brel 
Rodgers & llammerstein 

Susan 0. Taylor, 
Vice President, Class of 1974 



Presentation of Student Council Scholastic Awards Martin Aronson, 

President, Student Council 

Presentation to American Field Service Representative 

Harry A. Kelleher, Chairman, Board of Selectmen 



130 



Presentation of Awards 
Presentation of Scholarships 



Russell H. Johnston, Jr., Principal 



Mrs. Arthur G. Maguire, Hannah Adams Club 

Clement M. Frazier, President, Medfield Lions Club 

Mr. Henry D. Legere, Medfield Jaycees 

Paula B. Judge, President, Medfield Teachers Association 

Mr. George W. Hinkley, Sr., A. L. Auxiliary, Beckwith Post No. 110 

Leo G. Shiels, Commander, A. L. Beckwith Post No. 110 

Sgt. George W. Kingsbury, President, Medfield Police Association 



Presentation of American Legion Medals 

Medfield High School Concert Band 
West Side Story Selection 



Mr. Francis A. Woodlock, 
A. L. Beckwith Post No. 110 



Bernstein 
Arr. Sondheim 



Presentation of Diplomas 

Philip J. Burr, Chairman, Medfield School Committee 

Dr. Bruce C. Pulsifer, Superintendent of Schools 

Russell H. Johnston, Jr., Principal 
Benediction The Reverend Donald G. Misener 



Recessional 



Consecration of the House 



Beethoven 



CLASS OF 1974 



Janet Louise Akin 
Debra Lee Balcom 
David Stephen Battisti 
Karen Ann Baxendale 
Kathy Sue Baxendale 
Laurel Ann Bearer 
Susan Marie Berry 
Robert Ross Bertram 
Hallett D. Best 
Sharon Anne Bombelli 
Paul Christopher Bouin 
Gary William Boyt 
Christopher John Brais 
Kevin Patrick Brangwynne 
Ronald Eric Brennan 



Albert Francis Callahan, Jr. 
*Jill Anne Campbell 

Maureen Denise Capen 

Denice Elizabeth Cashen 

Marie Ann Cellucci 

Mark Champagne 

Doris Emilia Chevarie 

Stephen Paul Coffin 

George P. Constas 

Cheryl Ann Corbet t 

Rawson Richardson Cowen, III 

John Lawrence Coyne, Jr. 

Edward Lawrence Cummins, Jr. 
*Carol Ann Curran 

Annette Marie Daloia 



131 



Charles Gordon Daniel, Jr. 

Douglas James Michael Daniels 

Jeffrey Allan Davis 
*Sandra Linette Dearness 

Peter Michael DiMezza 

Edward Adams Donahue 

Cynthia Marie Dymek 

Mark Allen Erichsen 

Edwin Francis Evans 
*Ned Faltas 

Deborah Marie Feehan 

Mark Lewis Fisher 

Susan Mary Fitzpatrick 

Neil Charles Flavin 

Conrad Maass Franke 

Robert Francis Fraser 

Jean Elizabeth Fritz 

Elizabeth Ann Gabelhart 

Stewart Edward Galeucia 

John Francis Ganley, Jr. 
5 ' f Kimberly Anne Gannon 

Cheryl Gaye Garvey 

Peter Wallace Good 

Nancy Elizabeth Gorman 

Stephanie Modee Graham 

MaryEllen Gray 
*Susan Marie Gregoire 

Jeffrey Scott Griest 

Michael John Hamilton 

William Lee Harner 
*Craig Steven Harwood 

Maureen Elaine Hayes 
*Roy David Hegedus 
*Karen Marie Higgs 

Kenneth F. Himebaugh 

Jane Ellen Holmquist 

David Joseph Hoover 

Erline Marie Horgan 
^Christopher Vincent Hughes 

Jay William Hughes, Jr. 
J ' c Christine Marie Hunt 
*Teri Marie Hurd 

Charles J. P. Hutt 

Philip E. Ingles 

Shelley Winnifred Johnson 

W. Mark Johnson 

Linda Jean Kadar 
^Kathleen Elizabeth Kean 

Kristin Lee Kellar 

Nancy June Kelly 
*Bonnie Jo Keris 

David Richard Kilcoyne 
*David Gerard Kluga 



Richard Edward Knowles 

John Charles Lamb 

James Scott Landon 

Deborah Dwyer Lang 

Deborah Beryl Lantz 
*David Barry Lee 
*Maria Faye Lynch 

Elise Catherine Maggioni 

William Dennis Mahony 

Paul Dana Matz 

Katherine Ann Mayer 
*Lori Anne McFadden 

Stephanie Fran McGrath 

Gregory Charles McHale 

Nancy Carol McKnight 

David Robert McLaughlin 

David Rowe Mezzanotte 

Susan Marie Miner 

William S. Mitchell 

Laura Renee Monaghan 

Richard John Moore 

Stephen Christopher Moore 

Jayne Elizabeth Moran 

Ricky Leston Moran 

Lynette Jo Morse 

David James Munroe 

Ann Marie Murphy 

Lawrence Edward Murphy 

Geoffrey Joseph Myette 
* James El ford Nash, Jr. 

Deborah Kay Ness 
* Sandra Jean Newton 

Elizabeth Lyon Nichols 

Richard Elliott Nichols 

Donna Night in gd ale 

Jeffrey Craig Nutting 

Joan Marie O'Day 

Michelle Elise Ouellette 

Noreen Frances Owen 

Eric David Palson 

Tana Chase Palson 

Dale Courtney Peardon 
"Virginia Elaine Peebles 

Charles Edward Perkins 

Marjorie Elizabeth Perkins 
"Diane Marie Peterson 

John Williams Petrie 

Joanne Marie Phelan 

Mark Daniel Polito 

Debra Sue Portmann 

Susan Elaine Potts 

Elizabeth Ann Powell 
^Elizabeth Preston 



132 



Anita Louise Rabbette 
Patricia Mary Raffin 
Daniel L. Ramsauer 
Debra Cynthia Rasmusson 
t-*Vivienne Louise Read 
Donna Christine Renzi 
Robert William Rieger 
Robin Dennis Roberts 
Sandra Dawn Robertson 
Donna Marie Rock 
Edwin Henry Roth III 
Gregory Alexander Rucki 

*Jane Louise Running 
Wayne Alan Sarnie 
Linda Susan Savage 

*Janet Teresa Saviello 
Susan Ellen Schortmann 
Ernest Louis Schultz 
David Joseph Sears 

*Mary Catherine Seliger 
Virginia Gail Shea 
Bertram Francis Shipman II 
Kerry Ann Shoop 
Joseph Anthony Simonetti 
Paul Harry Simons 
Peter Frank Simpson 
Carol Aileen Smith 
Sheryl Ann Smith 



*Valerie Marie Sproul 
Paul Edward Strittmatter 
Peter Farnham Sturtevant 
Scott C. Sullivan 

*Steven Todd Sullivan 

*Susan Olive Taylor 

*Nancy Temple 
Barbara Ann Thompson 
Eileen Marie Thompson 
Jeffrey Parker Thompson 

*Cynthia Ann Thomson 
Pamela Ann Todesco 

*John Francis Tripp, Jr. 
William Lloyd Tulloch 
Linda Rae Tuttle 
Paul Jeffrey Vliet 
David Allen Weir 

^Jeffrey Thomas Wetmore 

*John Charles Whiting 
Thomas Wayne Williams 
John Conrod Willis II 
Scott Boyden Willis 
Evan Andrew Wilmarth 

*David Edward Wisniewski 

*David Lawrence Woglom 
Kevin Charles Woodlock 
Rich Allan York 



II 



^Members of the National Honor Society 
+American Field Service Student 




High School students, Kim Nickerson and Cindy Eilertson, discuss 
science with Principal Tassos Filledes. 

133 



Annual Guidance Report 1974 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Guidance Director of the Medfield Public Schools, I am pleased 
to submit my eleventh annual report. This encompasses the period from 
January 1, 1974 to December 31, 1974. 

In anticipation of the new legislation under the act known as "766" 
a new division of Special Services was formed with additional personnel 
to more effectively promulgate programs for children with special needs. 
As such, specialties in the Language Development, Speech and Hearing and 
psychological services came under the direct aegis of that division. 
Not only has this provided more adequate service under the able direction 
of Mr. Kevin Flynn but has freed and enabled guidance personnel through- 
out the system to act as ancilliary agents in evaluative and supportive 
planning in devising more meaningful programs for these children. The 
time for meeting with concerned parent groups and teacher rap sessions 
has thereby been increased. 

The screening process which we have developed over the past five 
years, first for incoming first graders and now the kindergarten has 
proved most effective using the latest techniques in assessing the 
maturation and readiness of children entering public school for the first 
time and was conducted again in April. 

Greater emphasis is now being given at both the Federal and State 
levels to career education. A group of career cluster experiences has 
begun in grades four through six that focuses on self -awareness and 
career types. Further exploration in this endeavor continues at the 
Junior High which broadens to include placement, follow-up, changes in 
course curriculum and involves discussions with children, counselors and 
selected teachers working cooperatively to expedite necessary changes. 

The demands made on the counselors at the High School level has 
become exceedingly complex and sometimes a student is seen at least a 
dozen times from his/her Sophomore to Senior year to facilitiate the 
assurity that all counseling techniques that have been utilized from 
grade one enables the counselor and counselee collaboratively to make 
adequate and meaningful analysis of the range and intensity of the 
students attitudes and aptitudes toward what ever options lie ahead. 

Certainly it is gratifying to note that 66% of the class of 1974 
went on to either two or four year degree granting institutions, but, 
this is no less important than 30% of the class who were prepared to go 
directly into some phase of productive employment. 

We found particularly in this transition year the importance of 
planned and continual interaction with the instructional staff to 
develop appropriate communication relative to guidance-classroom 
strategies. 

134 



A requisite for promoting these significant guidance programs was 
the active and continuous administrative support and encouragement which 
is gratefully acknowledged. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A,tan E. H<uting& 

Director of Guidance 





Elementary school guidance counselor, Bill Meehan, discusses school 
with Mark Peters. 



Report of the Director of Special Services 



To The Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with much pride that I draft this first annual report for the 
Special Services Department. 

Although the department was not a reality until August, the system's 
preparations for implementation of Chapter 766 began in the early Spring, 
1974, with the appointment of an Ad Hoc Committee under the chairmanship 
of Allan Belcher. This committee developed procedures and forms to comply 
with the process of core evaluations and made recommendations to the 
Superintendent about budget and staff needs. 



135 



When the 1974-75 school year began, there were five completely new 
faces to the system, and two persons already serving the schools were 
given additional responsibilities in the special needs area. Since the 
central staff were all new, the early weeks of the 1974-75 school year 
were spent in orientation, both to the new surroundings and to the new 
law. 

By the middle of October, the evaluation process for referrals was 
functioning well on both the school and system level. The year was 
closing out and the impact of Chapter 766 had been very smoothly and 
effectively absorbed. 

With the first few months of operation under this new comprehensive 
special education legislation passed, it is difficult not to look ahead. 
What will happen for the rest of the 1974-75 school year? What about 
next year? 

There is one major question mark which will affect the budget for 
1974-75. If the Core Evaluation Team decides before July, 1975 that 
private, day or residential programs are the best course of action for 
Medfield students, then we will have to request additional funds. 

Beyond the residential placements, we are rapidly reaching that 
balance point of services required by children in Medfield schools and 
the number of persons needed to deliver them. By extending the hours 
of our part-time learning disabilities personnel and by adding one full- 
time speech position, the Medfield schools will be able to provide the 
depth and variety of services required by statute. 

Continued alignment with the two regional collaborative programs 
will ensure availability of services for low incidence handicaps and for 
the substantially separate program prototypes. 

I would like to extend, through you, an invitation to the towns- 
people of Medfield to visit this new department housed in the Junior 
High School. Questions about Chapter 766 or services to children with 
special needs should be directed to this office at 359-7135. 

Buoyed by the positive results to date which have only been 
accomplished by the diligence of an excellent staff, I look forward to 
making many more annual reports. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ke.v4.n J. TJLijnn 

Director 



136 








r '"- 



Tommy Hunt gets some extra work accomplished with teacher Mrs. Pat Kallio. 



Instructional Materials Centers 



To the Superintendent: 

Instructional Materials Centers are at the heart of teaching. We 
are learning that media, if not the message, is at least the prime means 
of delivering the message. 

In this first annual report of the IMC system, it is appropriate to 
describe briefly the IMC concept, and its history in Medfield. Briefly, 
the concept consists of integrating teaching materials, facilities for 
their use by teachers and students, accompanying equipment, and 
necessary professional assistance in the field of media, on a building 
and a system-wide network. 

In Medfield, we have an IMC in each school building, each staffed 
by a professional in the field. In addition, we have, at the Junior 
High, a "System Material Center" to offer supervision and coordination, 
as well as added professional services and collections. 

It is with pride that the citizens of Medfield can observe the 
growth that has taken place in the past thirteen years in this area. 
This growth is the result of the efforts of many people — the public, 



137 



who have given us their support; school committees and administrators 
who have both recognized the need and responded to it; faculties who 
have been patient through the building, and responsive to services as 
they have been established; media personnel, who continue to give be- 
yond the requirements of their profession; a fine volunteer group, with- 
out whom our progress and services would have been seriously limited; 
and students themselves, who have given both the help and inspiration. 

Our present status can best be reflected in the following statistics, 
compiled on a system-wide basis for the school year of 1973-7^: 

. An average of 136 individual students use the IMCs each day. 

. 795 class groups have been brought to the IMCs by their teachers 
for instruction, in addition to the individuals numbered above. 

. Outside circulation has averaged 88 items per day in all schools. 

. The total book inventory now numbers approximately 25,000 volumes. 

. The total non-print (audiovisual) inventory now numbers 
approximately 3800 items, including such things as filmstrips, tapes, 
etc. 

. The IMCs in all schools supervise the inventory, maintenance, 
repair and distribution of approximately 600 items of audiovisual 
equipment . 

. The budget for 197^-75 represents approximately $13*00 per 
student for all services. 

. Our participation in ESEA Title II (a federal funding program) 
since 1966 has brought approximately $20,000 in addition to the school 
budget, currently representing approximately $1+500 per year. 

There are areas in which we are looking forward to further improve- 
ment; personnel are limited at present to a ratio of one media person to 
k66 students and 30 teachers, which limits services. Facilities are 
somewhat limited in the High School, Dale Street School, and Memorial 
School. Greater facilities for the use of non-print materials are 
needed in all schools, both in the IMCs and in individual classrooms 
and learning areas. Wider coverage of media is needed, for example, 
in videotape and microfilm holdings. Additional services are needed 
in respect to local production of teaching materials by teachers, 
students, and media personnel. 

We are planning improvements along all these lines, and once again 
wish to remind the public of our "open door" policy to all IMCs in the 
system. Come in, use us, and see what we are doing. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Van E. Hogan 

Director of Media Services 



138 




Checking out books with librarian Joanne Soyka are Vanessa Rudisill and 
Nancy Walker. 



Report of Occupational Education 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is ray pleasure to submit the fifth Annual Report on Occupational 
Education. 

In the Art program at the elementary level, ceramics has been 
introduced and has been greeted with enthusiasm by the students. A 
continuing effort is being made to bring as many experiences as possible 
to the students in these early years. Participation in the Junior High 
School program is such that relief in the form of additional staff and 
possibly facility is required. A similar situation exists in the Senior 
High School where potential enrollment has exceeded the availability of 
staff and facility. 

Enrollment in the Industrial Arts program at the Senior High School 
has increased, with several classes at maximum capacity. Of concern at 
present is the expansion of the industrial areas in the curriculum to 
give the student the broadest range of experiences to enable them to 
make wise career choices. 

The foods programs continue to be extremely popular at both the 



139 



Senior and Junior High School levels. The foods laboratory at the 
Senior High School remains at 100% utilization, with the Junior High 
School facility not far behind. 

Students in Business Education are participating for the first 
time in the advanced programs in Office Practice and Stenography. We 
are optomistic for the success of these students in office occupations 
and look forward to increased participation in these programs in the 
future. 

The support of the town in the recent vote for establishment of the 
Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School was most encouraging. 
The services of this facility in vocational education and career planning 
will be of great benefit to many of our students. 

The efforts and cooperation of the School Committee, Superintendents, 
Principals, and school faculties during this year are greatly appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JameJ> J. Rmnick, Jm. 

Director 




Susan Bourne puts some extra time in to sharpen her typing skills 



140 



Report of Medfield Adult Education 



To the Members of the School Committee and Dr. Bruce C. Pulsifer, 
Superintendent of Schools: 

January 8, 1974 was the beginning of the second semester of the 
1973-1974 Adult Education Program. A total of 18 classes in 15 differ- 
ent courses were continued by the director. The courses continued were 
Flower Arrangement, Clothing I and II, Typing I, Painting I and II, 
Drivers' Education, Woodworking, Cym for Men, Gym for Women, Tennis, 
Decoupage, Bridge, Crafts and Speed Reading. Courses discontinued were 
Tailoring, Cake Decorating, Golf, Spanish and Smokers Anonymous. All 
courses were offered on either Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday evenings 
between 6:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. 

The 1974-1975 Adult Education Program had an initial offering of 
26 different courses. 18 of these courses were established with double 
offerings in Flower Arrangement, Drivers' Education, Woodworking and 
Tennis. New courses established were leathercraf t , Yoga I, Yoga II, 
Shorthand, Slimnastics and Drawing. 

417 people registered for the above courses. An additional 105 
students were enrolled for the Drivers' Education Program in January 1974 

This year we requested and received state funds to support the 
Adult Education Program. 

Achievement night for the 1974-1975 Adult Education Program will be 
held on Wednesday, April 3, 1975. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Clio co 

Director 



141 







Director of Adult Education, John Cuoco 



Report of the Athletic Director 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my fourth report as the Athletic Director for 
the year ending December 31, 1974. The Junior High and Senior High 
athletic program is considered as an integral part of the curriculum. 

Interscholastic teams were fielded in football, basketball, and 
baseball at the Junior High. Following is the Junior High coaching 
staff: 



Football - Eighth and Ninth Grades-Edward Findlen 

George Calimaris 



Basketball - Seventh and Eighth Grades 

Basketball - Freshman - Gordon Hodne 
Baseball - Seventh and Eighth Grades - 
Baseball - Freshman - James Georgian 



- Robert Hunter 
James Georgian 

Stuart Maynard 



Interscholastic teams were fielded for girls in field hockey, 
basketball, gymnastics, Softball, tennis, and cheerleading at the High 
School. Girls' tennis and gymnastics were new sports for the 1973 pro- 
gram. Boys' teams competed in football, basketball, baseball, cross 



142 



country, soccer, indoor and outdoor track, tennis, and golf. Following 
is the High School coaching staff: 

Field Hockey - (Varsity) Nancy Kelley, (J.V.) Rozann Dugger 
Basketball - (Varsity) Karen Graham, (J.V.) Rozann Dugger 
Softball - (Varsity) Suzanne Moulton, (J.V.) Nancy Kelley 
Cheerleading - Janet McDermott, Linda Grady, and Judith Noble 
Football - (Varsity) William Young - Head Coach 

Gary Youlden - Assistant Coach 
Football - (J.V.) David Gibbs 

Basketball - (Varsity) George Ruggiero, (J.V.) David Gibbs 
Baseball - (Varsity) Gordon Hodne, (J.V.) Gary Stockbridge 
Cross Country - Robert Belmont 
Soccer - Thomas Cowell - Head Coach 

Ralph LeClere - Assistant Coach 
Indoor Track - Gary Youlden 
Outdoor Track - Robert Belmont - Head Coach 

Gary Youlden - Assistant Coach 
Tennis - Robert Hunter (boys) ; Susan Carney (girls) 
Golf - James Sproul 
Gymnastics - Mary Robbins 

All High School teams competed in the Tri-Valley League, except 
the indoor track team which participated in the Massachusetts Suburban 
Indoor Track League, and the soccer team which was scheduled independ- 
ently. The golf team played at Glen Ellen Country Club in Millis. The 
soccer team went to the Eastern Massachusetts State Soccer Tournament 
after an undefeated season on the regular schedule. The football team 
had an exciting season with a 7 - 3 record, and tied for second place 
in the League. 

The Big Blue Basketball team reached the quarter-finals of Division 
II of the Eastern Massachusetts State Basketball Tournament after a 
season of 18 wins, 2 losses in League play. Coach George Ruggiero took 
the Big Blue varsity team to Hawaii for the Maui Christmas Invitational 
from December 23-28, 1974, to kick off the 1974-75 season. Coaches 
Ruggiero and Gibbs worked very hard raising money to pay all the ex- 
penses for the trip. 

The boys' tennis team took first place in the Tri-Valley League. 
Bill Dugger and Mark Champagne reached the quarter finals in Eastern 
Massachusetts Doubles competition, and the team qualified for the 
Eastern Massachusetts Tennis Tournament for the third consecutive year. 

The Sports Banquet, sponsored by the Medfield School Boosters, saw 
the awarding of certificates and letter jackets to all successful partic- 
ipants. Trophies were given for most valuable player in each varsity 
sport. The Edward Keyes School Spirit Award, which is a plaque and a 
$300 award, was presented to David Mezzanotti. The Scholar Athlete 
Awards were presented to Virginia Peebles and David Lee. 

For the third year there has been a marked increase in interest in 
interscholastic athletics. Students have swollen the numbers partici- 
pating in the existing offerings, while two new sports have beed added 

143 



to the program. Both Title IX of the Federal Health, Education, and 
Welfare Acts and Chapter 622 of the Massachusetts General Laws offer 
further impetus to our continued efforts to provide equal opportunity 
for girls in the athletic curriculum. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BdnaAd Shaa. 

Athletic Director 




Chris Sullivan battles for the ball with two Holliston girls in a hard- 
fought field hockey game. 



Report of the School Lunch Program 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with pleasure that I submit this annual report for the year 
ending December 31, 1974. 

The Lunch Program has a staff of 26 members and two student workers. 
Lunches are available to all students. 



144 



The National School Lunch Program is designed to increase the well 
being of our students and to establish good eating habits. 

School lunches are planned so that they will meet one-third the 
daily nutritional requirements of each child. The Type A lunch approved 
in the Commonwelath of Massachusetts must be planned to contain the re- 
quired quantities of the following foods as a minimum: 

MEAT AND MEAT ALTERNATE-Two ounces (edible portion as served) of 
lean meat, poultry or fish; or two ounces of cheese; or one egg; or one- 
half cup of dry beans or peas; or four tablespoons of peanut butter; or 
an equivalent quantity of any combination of the above listed foods. 
To be counted in meeting this requirement, these foods must be served 
in a main dish or in a main dish and one other menu item. 

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS-A three-fourths cup serving consisting of two 
or more vegetables or fruits or both, in raw or cooked form. A serving 
(one-fourth or more) of full-strength vegetable or fruit juice may be 
counted to meet not more than one-fourth cup of this requirement. 

BREAD-One slice of whole-grain or enriched bread; or a serving of 
other breads such as cornbread, biscuits, rolls, muffins, etc., made 
with whole grain or enriched meal of flour. 

BUTTER OR FORTIFIED MARGARINE-One teaspoon of butter or fortified 
margarine. This may be used as a spread on bread, as a seasoning, or 
in the preparation of other foods in the lunch. 

WHOLE MILK-one-fourth pint whole, unflavored milk. 

Nutritional needs of children require that special attention be 
given to include adequate servings of foods rich in Vitamin A and Iron 
daily, and Vitamin C rich foods frequently during the week. 

Science classes at the Ralph Wheelock School invited the Lunch 
Director to speak about the planning of lunches and how the amount of 
food buying was determined. 

We are looking forward to the installment of much needed new 
equipment for cooking in the Senior High School Kitchen. When the new 
equipment is ready for use, we will be able to serve spaghetti and some 
other foods the students have missed since the old equipment broke down 
in October. 

During the past year we have served a total of 269,779 lunches in 
our schools. 



145 



I sincerely thank the Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent, 
School Committee, Cafeteria Staff and other personnel for their assist- 
ance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

VoKothy E. AvQAif 

School Lunch Director 




High School student Vicki Barrows buys her lunch from cafeteria worker, 
Mrs. Loretta Oglesby. 



Report of Title I, Summer School 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Director of the Title I, E.S.E.A. Summer Program it is a 
pleasure to submit this report for the fiscal year ending December 31, 
1974. 

Our total enrollment was 105 students representing Kindergarten 
through grade 5 (90% from the primary grades) for a six week period 
commencing June 26 throug August 2, 1974. 

The children who were chosen to participate in this program were 



146 



those who were not working up to their grade level but who have the 
ability to do so. The priorities of educational needs in these grades 
was and has been assessed to be in the area of Reading and Mathematics. 

All participating students were administered the Stanford Reading 
Diagnostic Test on a pre and post basis. Results were returned to 
the respective schools for further action. The material is utilized by 
the staff during the school year to help the teachers to understand and 
work better with the affected students. The community is made aware of 
the results as they attend open house and by letters sent to the home 
prior to the program announcing the purpose, objectives, and criteria 
for participation. 

I wish to thank the Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent, 
School Committee, Principals, and the citizens of Medfield for their 
cooperation and assistance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Afimand L. Ltbonuf, 

Title I Director 




Title I Director, Armand Leboeuf, checks out a controlled reader with 
teacher, Cynthia Zive. 



147 



Report of the School Health Department 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

School Health Services, as a part of the school program is a 
constructive and effective approach to the development of a healthy 
society. As knowledge regarding the relationship of health status to 
learning ability increases, the responsibility of the school nurse 
increases. 

There are two nurses for the five schools who provide a complete 
school health program which includes: 

A. Health examinations are conducted by a school physician in the 
presence of the school nurse, who enters the doctor's 
observationb on the school health records. 

B. All students in the fourth, seventh and tenth grades are to be 
examined under Chapter 71 of the General Laws of the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Because the family 
physician has a comprehensive knowledge of the health status 
of the child we encourage that the physical examination be 
done by the family physician. 

C. Preschool children are to be examined by their own physician 
prior to entering first grade in September. All pupils enter- 
ing kindergarten and pupils transferring in from another school 
system are required to be immunized against communicable 
diseases such as diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and 
measles. These records are reviewed by the school nurse 
periodically. 

D. All pupils participating in competitive sports are examined 
before the start of practice. 

FIRST AID: 

The school nurse provides emergency care in cases of injury or 
sudden illness. First aid is the immediate, temporary care given to a 
pupil in the school at the time of an accident or sudden illness, or 
until he can be returned to class, sent home or the services of a 
physician obtained. 

MEETINGS AND CONFERENCES: 

The school nurses are members of and have attended meetings such 
as the New England Regional School Nurses Association, State School 
Nurses Association and local Teachers Association. We have also served 
on several committees in an attempt to search out and evaluate new 
health materials. 



148 



We have taken courses which offer information for self -improvement 
such as one on the new Chapter 766 Law for students with special needs. 

We would like to thank the school personnel in each building whose 
able assistance makes it possible for us to maintain our health program, 

Respectfully submitted, 

lAadoZOyino, HaA&Lng, R.N. 
Nancy Ka&haJLma, R.U. 



149 



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150 



Report of the Director of Buildings and Grounds 



To the Superintendent: 

It is a pleasure to submit my sixth annual report as Director of 
Buildings and Grounds for the year ending December 31, 1974. 

The following is a compilation of repair, replacement, additions 
and preventive maintenance done on our schools during the past year: 

MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

New roof completed on the entire building, sixteen scuppers in- 
stalled to drain water from the roof. 

Exterior doors and louvers repainted. 

Replaced two louvers in boiler room and four sky lights. 

Replaced several areas of worn and broken floor tile. 

Installed partition in the Art room, and an exhaust vent in the 
Speech room. 

DALE STREET SCHOOL 

Installed partitions in the School Committee room to make office 
space. 

Replaced one vacumn cleaner. 

Repaired roofs and gutters, and cement sidewalks. 
Installed three air conditioners in the Central Offices. 
Installed wire mesh over windows and doors in Auditorium. 

RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

Installed 40 parking lot stops for new parking areas. 
Installed asphalt at rear of building at student bus pickup area. 
Installed new sidewalk at the sida entrance for students. 
Installed lights over pumps in the boiler room. 

Installed partition to enclose the front office and separate it 
from the lobby. 

Painted all outside doors. 
Varnished all window sills. 
Replaced five univent motors. 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Installed 24 parking lot stops for new parking area. 
Installed fence around basketball area. 
Repaired tennis court fence damaged by vandals. 

Replaced one vacumn cleaner, two burner nozzles, and four univent 
valves. 



151 



SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

New roof completed on entire building, twenty- four scuppers put in 
to drain water from the roof. 

Installed two new steel door frames and doors. 

Replaced two complete sets of crash bars, seven door closers that 
were damaged by vandals. 

Painted interior of building with the exception of the Auditorium. 

ALL SCHOOLS 

All burners were cleaned and repaired. All boilers, smoke pipes 
and chimneys were cleaned. All fire boxes repaired. 

Locker room floors were painted, all gym floors, bleachers and 
stages revarnished. Also, the never ending replacement of glass and 
the repairs to our fields, buildings, fences, and playground equipment 
all caused by vandalism. 

I am grateful for the support given to me by my entire staff, 
custodians, groundsmen and maintenance department. 

Sincere appreciation is extended to the School Committee, Superin- 
tendent, and Assistant Superintendent for their cooperation and assist- 
ance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HaAotd Vtvltovil 

Director of Buildings 
and Grounds 



152 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



VITAL STATISTICS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1974 



153 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



Chapter 45 of the General Laws of Massachusetts requires that 
every physician shall within fifteen days after the birth at which 
he has officiated, report the same to the Town Clerk of the Town in 
which the birth took place. 

Parents within forty days after the birth of a child and every 
house-holder, within forty days after a birth in his house shall 
cause notice thereof to be given to the Town Clerk of the Town in 
which the birth took place. 

Failure to give such notice is punishable with a fine. 

Blanks for the return may be obtained upon application to the 
Town Clerk. 

Parents and others are requested to carefully examine the 
following lists and if there are any errors or omissions, report 
such at once to the Town Clerk. This is important so that we may 
have as accurate and complete a record of Vital Statistics as 
possible. 



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157 



MARRIAGES RECORDED IN MEDFIELD DURING 1974 



January 18 
January 19 
January 26 
February 2 
February 9 
February 16 
February 16 
March 2 
March 15 
March 16 
March 22 
March 23 
March 30 
April 21 
April 21 
April 27 
May 4 
May 4 
May 10 
May 17 
May 18 
May 18 
May 25 



Stephen J. Keris, Jr. of Millis and 

Maryann E. Blanchard of Medfield 

Jonathan Richard David of Foxboro and 

Elaine Claire Avery of Medfield 

Justin W. Poor III of Medfield and 

Patricia L. Silvestri of Walpole 

J. Daniel Martin of Canton and 

Kathleen Lee (DesJardins) of Medfield 

Joseph J. Volk of Medfield and 

Linda G. Woodward (Kaminski) of Dover 

Edward Abbott Facey of Seabrook, N.H. and 

Barbara Ann Neff of Medfield 

Kevin Knehr of Medfield and 

Jodie Peplinski of Medfield 

Charles J. Daniels of Stoughton and 

Jean L. Sheridan of Stoughton 

William A. McCarey, Jr. of Stoughton and 

Linda Parker (Burlingame) of Medfield 

Lawrence Peter Chiappetta of Brookline and 

Victoria Reid Sauer of Watertown 

Thomas L. Langley of Medfield and 

Nathalie F. Rosen of Randolph 

Edward E. Jackman of Medfield and 

Linda M. Beer (Tayes) of Medfield 

Paul E. Thibodeau of Norwood and 

Diane F. Johannessen of Medfield 

George L. Thompson of Franklin and 

Yachiyo Church (Ryuno) of Framingham 

Ron Eric Shobaken of Milford and 

Debra Ann Cook of Medfield 

David Catenacci of Medfield and 

Diane Sheridan of Medfield 

Randall D. Eakin of Medfield and 

Lorraine J. Fruci of Norwood 

Thomas M. Dippert of Needham and 

Judith Ann Robinson of Medfield 

Thomas James Tincler of Medfield and 

Coleen Marie O'Brien of Medfield 

Richard Clayton Thayer of Medfield and 

Mary Margaret Hanlon of Medway 

George B. Peterson of Framingham and 

Brenda Lee Anderson of Medfield 

George A. Fisher of Framingham and 

Martha A. Kenney of Medfield 

Barry Lester Briggs of Norwood and 

Sandra Lou Deal of Pittsfield 



158 



May 25 
May 26 
May 26 
June 1 
June 1 
June 1 
June 9 
June 9 
June 15 
June 16 
June 19 
June 22 
June 22 
June 28 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
July 6 
July 16 
July 27 
August 9 
August 10 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 23 



Joseph A. Calo of Medfield and 

Gay K. Sanderson of Hinsdale 

Michael Chapman Mearian of Natick and 

Susan Wallingford of Medfield 

Terrence Michael Dennis of Arlington, VA and 

Diana Marie Caraviello of Medfield 

Thomas P. Andrulot of Medfield and 

Patricia L. Callahan of Medfield 

George Nicholas Sarikas of Medfield and 

Lynne Rae Authelet of Foxboro 

Stephen R. Thompson of Medfield and 

Ann C. Cook of Medfield 

Bradford A. Merritt of Scituate and 

Deirdre E. Flaherty of Boston 

Roger T. Moss of Melrose and 

Elsa M. Rietschler of Maiden 

Gino Bravo of Medfield and 

Mary Tocci of Dover 

Dennis E. Harrington of Hyde Park and 

Twila A. Good of Medfield 

Paul M. Norman of Medfield and 

Margaret Bisson (Manderson) of Medfield 

Rodney L. Smith of Blue Hill, ME and 

Roberta Ann Bartlett of Walpole 

David R. Feeley of Arlington and 

Margo A. Mastropieri of Medfield 

Stanley L. Stahl of Flagstaff, AR and 

Gail M. Nyren of Medfield 

Michael Gerald Reed of Middleboro and 

Jeanne Susan Lovelace of Medfield 

Richard R. Mros of Taunton and 

Barbara F. Keirstead of Medfield 

James R. Scott of Medfield and 

Diane Running of Medfield 

Albert Dupuis of Medfield and 

Mary Minichielli (Packard) of Milford 

William J. Healey, Jr. of Needham and 

Carol A. McDermott (Dunbar) of Dover 

Robert F. Morrissey of Bellingham and 

Frances Peterson (Orpin) of Medfield 

Bruce A. Hunter of Medfield and 

Diana C. Afarian of Cambridge 

Lawrence Clark of Medfield and 

E. Augusta Cain (Simpson) of Medfield 

Robert H. Clorite, Jr. of Norfolk and 

Maureen D. Capen of Medfield 

William Edward Schulz of Norwood and 

Diane Jane Goucher of Medfield 

George Frod of E. Walpole and 

Jean Kaerwer of Medfield 

Paul E. Cuca of Marlboro and 

Maureen A. Doherty (Fay) of Medfield 



159 



August 24 
August 24 
August 24 
August 24 
August 25 
August 25 
August 25 
August 29 
September 1 
September 6 
September 7 
September 14 
September 21 
September 28 
September 28 
October 5 
October 11 
October 12 
October 13 
October 19 
October 27 
November 16 
November 17 
November 23 
December 6 
December 7 



Thomas E. Bohner of Med field and 

Nona L. Megan of Norwood 

James O'Malley of Medfield and 

Cheryl Holmes of Millis 

Gary Vollmuth of Medfield and 

Denise C. McGill of Dover 

Charles Dale Seitz of St. Petersburg, FL and 

Muriel J. Walker of Medfield 

John Gregory Holloway of Barring ton, RI and 

Gail Ann McCurry of Medfield 

John M. Bachelder of Medfield and 

Susan P. Pellerin of Natick 

Frank Douglas, Jr. of Mansfield and 

Joanne Marie Kaerwer of Canton 

Donald H. Phipps, Jr. of Medfield and 

Katherine A. Koukol of Mansfield 

Paul X. Nannicelli of Medfield and 

Louise M. Lawson of Dedham 

Arthur D. Little of Medfield and 

E. Janice Leeming of Lincoln 

Thomas Flavin Hutt of Medfield and 

Kimberly R. Kobel of Medfield 

Henry R. Keene, Jr. of Dedham and 

Andrea L. Breed of Medfield 

Daniel J. Kane of Medfield and 

Leslie I. Mclnnis of Belmont 

Thomas J. Vine of Plainville and 

Deborah A. Budd of Medfield 

Andrew H. Sawyer of Holliston and 

Evelyn Kohn of Medfield 

William H. Hewett of Wellesley and 

Ellen Marie Lane of Medfield 

Paul L. DeRoche of Medfield and 

Christine M. Comparone of Salisbury 

John G. Dugan of West Roxbury and 

Catherine Hinkley of Medfield 

Ronald E. Stanley of Newton and 

Linda M. Calo of Medfield 

Supriya Mehta of Calcutta, India and 

Janet Gould of Medfield 

Theodore C. Maguire of Medfield and 

Elaine G. Taylor of Medfield 

Victor Taggart of Norwood and 

Martha Anderson of Medfield 

David W. Bussow of Medfield and 

Susan E. Barrett of Medfield 

Richard Seanbeck of Millis and 

Pamela S. Wilde of Medfield 

Jeffrey W. Canova of Medfield and 

Karen Melchin of E. Bridgewater 

Carlton Theodore Conrad of Mansfield and 

Margaret Ann Handy of Franklin 



160 



December 21 Frederick Charles Lenz, Jr. of Columbus, PA and 

Diane Alice Eisele of Medfield 
December 22 Larry Alan Stockett of San Diego, California and 

Nancy Marie Bready of Medfield 
December 28 Edward Beard of Medfield and 

Margaret J. Dillon of Medfield 
December 28 Robert M. D' Antonio of Fremont, California and 

Elaine Aldrich Dunbar of Quincy 
December 30 Donald B. Mailing of Norwood and 

Nancy A. Weir of Medfield 



161 



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163 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said 
County, greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in 
elections and in town affairs to meet at the Memorial School, in said 
Medfield, on Monday, the twenty-fifth day of March A.D. , 1974 at 6:00 
o'clock A.M., then and there to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually 
by ballot, viz: 

One Moderator and one member of the Planning Board for one year. 

One Selectman, one Assessor, two members of the School Committee, 
two Trustees of the Public Library, one Collector of Taxes, two 
Park Commissioners, all for three years. 

One member of the Planning Board and one member of the Housing 
Authority, both for five years. 

The polls will be opened at 6:00 o'clock A.M. and shall be closed 
at 8:00 o'clock P.M. 

On Monday, the twenty-ninth day of April A.D. 1974 commencing at 
7:30 P.M., the following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark 
Kingsbury School gymnasium in said Medfield, viz: 



ARTICLES 2 THROUGH 50 WILL APPEAR WITH THE REPORT OF ADJOURNED 

TOWN MEETING APRIL 29, 1974 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested 
copy thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, 
seven days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting 
aforesaid. 



164 



Given under our hands this twelth day of February, A.D., Nineteen 
Hundred and Seventy-four. 

HoAAy A. KoJULzhoA 
JoA&pk L. Ma/icioneJXe. 
A/vtkuA L. VcuviaA, 
Selectmen of Medfield 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Medfield, Massachusetts 
March 16, 1974 



Norfolk, ss. 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabi- 
tants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections to meet 
at the time and for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of 
said warrant in not less than five public places in the Town of Medfield 
at least seven days before the time of holding the meeting. 

WWLlam H. Mann,, 
Constable of Medfield 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING FOR THE 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

MARCH 25, 1974 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant the meeting was opened at 6:00 
A.M. by the reading of the warrant through Article 1. The ballot boxes 

were checked and found to be in working order, voting lists displayed 

and instructions to voters and specimen ballots posted within the 

polling place. 

The following persons were sworn in and assigned to their Precincts. 

PRECINCT ONE: Warden, John F. Ganley; Clerk, Florence Roberts; 
Tellers, Mary MairEtienne, Roberta Kolsti 

PRECINCT TWO: Warden, Clara Denucci; Clerk, Maybelle Maguire; 
Tellers, Muriel Harris, Elizabeth Ippoliti 

PRECINCT THREE: Warden, Elmer 0. Portmann, Jr.,; Clerk, Eva Grover; 
Tellers, Frederick Rogers, Jr., Anna Murphy 

PRECINCT FOUR: Warden, Barbara Connors; Clerk, Elizabeth Ekstrom; 
Tellers, Phyllis Ripley, Bea Bangs 

The polls were declared closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote cast was 2062. This included 28 absentee ballots. 

The tabulation and counting of ballots cast was as follows: 

165 



PRECINCTS 
3 4 



Total 



MODERATOR - 1 year 



William F. 


Nourse 


338 


428 


523 


496 


1785 


Blanks 




44 


70 


79 


81 


274 


Scattered 




1 


1 




1 


3 



MEMBER OF THE PLANNING BOARD - 1 yea r 



c. 


Richard McCullough 


303 


382 


507 


454 


1646 


Bl 


anks 


80 


117 


95 


124 


416 



SELECTMEN - 3 years 



Harold E. Plough 


124 


167 


241 


156 


688 


Harry A. Kelleher 


254 


322 


358 


409 


1343 


Blanks 


5 


10 


3 


13 


31 



ASSESSOR - 3 years 



Roger E. Hardy 

Blanks 

Scattered 



316 


412 


504 


488 


1720 


67 


86 
1 


98 


90 


341 
1 



MEMBERS OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE (2) - 3 years 



Phyllis P. Cohen 


96 


146 


192 


151 


585 


Leo J. McCabe 


145 


185 


138 


180 


648 


Margaret E. Weinstock 


84 


102 


181 


126 


493 


Everett E. Fuller 


197 


257 


353 


283 


1090 


Thomas McMurtrie 


165 


205 


253 


256 


879 


Blanks 


79 


103 


87 


160 


429 



TRUSTEES OF PUBLIC LIBRARY (2) - 3 years 



James F. Barton 


302 


367 


345 


241 


1255 


David L. Wilmarth 


203 


233 


286 


126 


&48 


Mary Ellen Donahue 


204 


258 


226 


155 


843 


Barbara A. Houck 


145 


210 


128 


132 


615 


Blanks 


144 


136 


171 


112 


563 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES - 3 years 



Nancy J. Preston 


163 


224 


297 


248 


932 


Charles H. Rayner, Jr. 


215 


262 


281 


317 


1075 


Blanks 


5 


13 


24 


13 


55 



MEMBERS OF PARK & RECREATION COMMISSION (2) - 3 years 



Thomas A. Madsen 
Arthur F. McEvoy 
Robert E. Ryall 



128 


191 


192 


178 


689 


198 


277 


368 


326 


1169 


94 


113 


189 


123 


519 



166 









PRECINCT 






1 


2 


3 


4 


Total 


PARK & REC. cont. 












Barbara F. Maliff 


205 


246 


274 


290 


1012 


Blanks 


141 


171 


184 


239 


735 



MEMBER OF PLANNING BOARD - five years 



Donald J. McDonald 


312 


402 


509 


463 


1686 


Blanks 


71 


97 


93 


115 


376 



MEMBER OF HOUSING AUTHORITY - five years 



Michael W. 


Tammero 


315 


387 


484 


452 


1638 


Blanks 




67 


112 


116 


124 


419 


Scattered 




1 




2 


2 


5 



Tellers for counting ballots after the polls were closed were: 
Cathryn Shaughnessy, Margaret J. Marr, Edna Hinkley, Sara Regan, Joan 
Fuller, Margaret Bernick, Stephanie Peck, Jeanne Mikelonis , Joan Snow, 
Jeanette Lovelace, Dwight Adams, Janice Ripley, Joan Bussow, Barbara 
Armstrong, Mary Harney, Weston Kolsti, Steven Rudnick, Diane Scott, 
Donna Murphy, Jean Sander, Beatrice Bangs, Eva Grover, Marion Bosselman, 
Mary Lovell, Maybelle Maguire, Anna Murphy, Beverly Smith, Muriel Harris, 
Mary MairEtienne, John Downing, Barbara Connors, Laraine Ripley, 
Elizabeth Ippoliti, Jane Minesinger, Phyllis Ripley, Florence Roberts, 
Jessie Portmann, Jane Kelly, Clara DeNucci, Elmer Portmann, Jr. , John 
F. Ganley, Richard DeSorgher, Roberta Kolsti, John DeMartino, Benjamin 
Astley, and Sheldon Murphy. 

After the results were publicly announced, the Ballots, tally sheets 
and master sheet were turned over to the Town Clerk for safe keeping as 
prescribed by law. 

A true copy attest: 

Nancy J. Pica ton, 
Town Clerk 

A recount for the Trustees of the Public Library was held on 
April 6, 1974 with the following results: 



James F. Barton 


302 


366 


354 


239 


1252 


David L. Wilmarth 


203 


230 


285 


129 


847 


Mary Ellen Donahue 


203 


258 


225 


156 


842 


Barbara A. Houck 


147 


208 


129 


133 


617 


Blanks 


143 


142 


172 


109 


566 



Ua.nc.ij J. Piston, 
Town Clerk 



167 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
FOR THE TRANSACTION OF BUSINESS 

April 29, 1974 



The meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 7:50 P.M. at 
the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School Gymnasium after ascertaining that 
a quorum was present. Those present were invited to join in the Salute 
to the Flag. Following the reading of the service of the Warrant for 
the Meeting, the following action was taken on the Articles appearing 
in the Warrant. 

NOTE: The action taken on all articles will be recorded 
in their regular sequence regardless of the order 
on which they were voted. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the 
several Town Officers for the past year. 

ARTICLE 2. Voted to accept the reports of the several Town 
Officers for the past year. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or transfer 
from available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any 
other Town Officer, Board, Commission and Committee to defray operating 
expenses of the Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1974, or 
such other sums as the Town may determine as required by General Laws, 
Chapter 41, Section 108, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 3. Voted to appropriate the following named sums of money 
to defray the departmental and other expenses of the Town for the fiscal 
year commencing July 1, 1974, as required by General Laws, Chapter 41, 
Section 108: 

A100-00 SELECTMEN 
A100-01 Administration 

100 Personnel $ 1,975. 

200 Operations 2,680. 

300 Supplies 1,925. 

400 Other Charges 0. 

500 Equipment 0^ $ 6,580. 

A100-02 Tdwil ACcbuhfaiit 

100 Personnel 3,500. 
200 Operations 150. 

500 Equipment 0. 3,650. 

A100-03 Executive Secretary 
100 Personnel 82,469. 

200 Operations 425. 

300 Supplies 150. 83,044. 

Total A100-01, 02, 03 93,274. 

f 

168 



A101-00 Town Counsel 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
400 Other Charges 

A102-00 Treasurer 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 

A103-00 Tax Collector 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
500 Equipment 

A104-00 Town Clerk 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
500 Equipment 

A105-00 Assessors 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
400 Other Charges 
500 Equipment 

A106-00 Planning Board 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 

A107-00 Park & Recreation 
A107-01 Administration 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

300 Supplies 

500 Equipment 

A107-02 Swim Pond 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 

A107-03 Recreation Programs 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 



6,200, 

1,200, 

80, 

0, 



3. 


,800. 


2, 


,360. 




30. 


4. 


,400. 




500. 


1. 


,910. 




0. 


3. 


,000. 




616. 




96. 




0. 


1. 


,750. 


11, 


,275. 




810. 




150. 




275. 




0. 


7, 


,625. 




40. 



2,225. 

4,752. 

200. 

5,740. 



9, 


,975. 


1, 


,625. 




360. 


5. 


,675. 


1, 


,700. 


1, 


,560. 



$ 7,480 



6,190 



6,810 



3,712 



14,260, 



7,665 



12,917 



11,960, 



8,935 



169 



A107-04 Parks 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
500 Capital Expenditures 

A107-05 Skating 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



2 
1 


,000. 

,385. 

30. 

540. 


380. 
500. 



$ 3,955. 



880. 



Total A107-01 thru 5 

A108-00 Election & Registration 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
500 Equipment 

A109-00 Town Hall 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 



38,647. 



5, 


,890. 


3, 


,022. 




38. 




200. 


3, 


,420. 


15, 


,675. 


6 : 


,000. 



9,150. 



25,095. 



Al 10-00 Highway Department 
Al 10-01 Administration 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

300 Supplies 



39,432. 

0. 

1,461. 



40,893. 



Al 10-02 Chapter 81 
200 Operations 



0. 



Al 10-04 Maintenance 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

Al 10-05 Sidewalks 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

Al 10-06 Snow & Ice 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

Al 10-07 Town Garage 
200 Operations 



76,568. 




50,400. 


126,968. 


0. 




2,000. 


2,000. 


14,500. 




35,905. 


50,405. 


9,075. 


9,075. 



Total A110-01, 02, 04, 05, 06, 07 



229,341 



Alll-00 Police 
All 1-01 Administration 
100 Personnel 



42,716, 



42,716 



170 



152,437. 




6,400. 




950. 


$ 159,787 


9,000. 




6,500. 


15,500 


5,270. 


5,270 


5,600. 


5,600 


12,240. 




300. 


12,540 



All 1-02 Operations 
100 Personnel I 

200 Operations 
300 Supplies 

Alll-03 Cruiser 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 

All 1-04 Communications 
200 Operations 

All 1-05 Traffic Markings & Signs 
200 Operations 

Alll-06 School Traffic 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

Alll-09 Equipment Acquisition 
500 Equipment CL_ 

Total Alll-01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 09 ■ 241,413 



Al 12-00 Fire Department 
Al 12-01 Administration 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 75. 

Al 12-02 Operations 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
400 Other Charges 
500 Equipment 3,850. 29,268, 

Total A112-01, 02 44,018 



Al 14-^00 Tree & Moth 
A114-01 Mosquito Control 
200 Operations 3,328. 3,328, 



13, 


,175. 


1, 


,575. 


16, 


,918. 


8, 


,500. 




0. 


3, 


,850. 



Al 14-02 Tree Care 




100 Personnel 


7,600. 


200 Operations 


1,340. 


300 Supplies 


50. 


Al 14-03 Insect & Pest Control 




100 Personnel 


1,360. 


200 Operations 


1,000. 


500 Equipment 


0. 



8,990, 



2,360 



171 



A114-04 Dutch Elm 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



1,735. 
800. 



$ 2,535 



Total A114-01, 02, 03, 04 



17,213 



A115-00 Building Inspector 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
400 Other Charges 
500 Equipment 

Al 16-00 Plumbing Inspector 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

A117-00 Gas Inspector 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

Al 18-00 Wiring Inspector 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

Al 19-00 Sealer Wts & Measures 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

A120-00 Dog Officer 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 

A121-00 Civil Defense 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
500 Equipment 

A122-00 Board of Appeals 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 

A123-00 Street Lights 
200 Operations 

A125-00 Board of Health 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 



6,200. 




830. 




518. 




0. 




0. 


7,548. 


1,364. 




140. 


1,504. 


930. 




150. 


1,080. 


2,480. 




340. 


2,820. 


175. 




120. 


295. 


9,860. 




1,570. 




3,200. 


14,630.* 


550. 




30. 




600. 


1,180. 


525. 




335. 




140. 


1,000. 


20,600. 


20,600. 


595. 




4,850. 




800. 


6,245. 



172 



A126-00 Public Health Nurse 
200 Operations 

A127-00 Garbage Disposal 
200 Operations 

A128-00 Mental Health 
200 Operations 

A129-00 Ambulance 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 

A130-00 Sanitary Landfill 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 

A131-00 Sewer 

A131-01 Sewer Operations 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

300 Supplies 

A132-00 Veterans 

A132-01 Veterans Operations 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

300 Supplies 

400 Benefits 

A132-02 Grave Markers 
200 Operations 



2,575. 


$ 2,575 


18,000. 


18,000 


5,800. 


5,800 


4,120. 




1,025. 




50. 


5,195 


11,344. 




10,350. 




10,500. 


32,194 



16,946, 
25,164, 
700 



1, 


,120 




470 




157 


16, 


,000 



42,810, 



150 



17,747 



150, 



Total A132-01, 02 



17,897 



A133-00 Memorial Day 
200 Operations 

A134-00 Council on Aging 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 

A135-00 Library 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
400 Credits 
500 Equipment 



500. 



1. 


,400. 
200. 




22, 


,800. 




13. 


,040. 




1. 


,050. 




(9, 


,932. 
450. 


) 



500 



1,600, 



27,408 



173 



A140-00 Water Department 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 
400 New Services 



A147-00 Development & Indus. Comm. 
200 Operations 

A148-00 Historical Commission 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

A150-00 Town Debt 
A150-01 Principal 
400 Other Charges 

A150-02 Interest 
400 Other Charges 

Total A150-01, 02 

A155-00 Insurance 
A155-01 Vehicles 
200 Operations 

A155-02 Workmen's Comp. 
200 Operations 

A155-03 Property & Liability 
200 Operations 

A155-04 Group 
200 Operations 



23,074 
28,467 
1,616, 
13,980, 



A145-00 Cemetery Commission 




100 Personnel 


11,000. 


200 Operations 


2,200 


500 Equipment 


600. 


A146-00 Conservation Commission 




100 Personnel 


0. 


200 Operations I 


1,130. 


300 Supplies 


45. 


400 Other Charges 


5,245. 



0, 



0, 
150, 



464,000 , 
262,000, 



5. 


,800. 


13. 


,500. 


13, 


,000 , 


59, 


,922. 



$ 67,137. 



13,800. 



Total A155-01, 02, 03, 04 



6,420. 
0. 

150. 

464,000. 

262,000 
726,000. 

5,800. 

13,500. 

15,000. 

59,922. 
94,222. 



A160-00 Town Report 
200 Operations 



6,635, 



6,635. 



174 



A161-00 County Retirement 
200 Other Charges 

A162-00 Stabilization Fund 
400 Other Charges 

A163-00 Reserve Fund 
400 Other Charges 

A170-00 Town Meetings 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 

A171-00 Warrant Committee 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 

A175-00 Personnel Board 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



$ 51,639. 







40,000, 



305. 

1,435. 

0. 



35. 
35. 



400, 
375, 



$ 51,639. 



0. 



40,000. 



1,740. 



70. 



775. 



A180-00 Regional Voc. Tech. High School 
200 Operations 25,168 



25,168. 



1000-00 School Administration 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

2000-00 Instruction 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

3000-00 Other School Services 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
300 Supplies 

4000-00 Plant Oper. & Main. 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

6000-00 Community Services 
100 Personnel 

7000-00 Acquisition of Assets 
300 Supplies & Materials 

9000-00 Programs with Other Systems 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
400 Other Charges & Credits 

Total 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, 7000, 9000 $3,658,559.** 



175 



8000-01 Vocational Education 
400 Other Intergovernmental 

8000-02 Adult Education 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



$ 17,063 



-0- 
2,700 



$ 17,063 



-0- 
2,700, 



8000-03 School Planning & Building Committee 

100 Personnel 250, 

200 Operations 250, 

300 Supplies 

400 Other Charges 0, 



TOTAL ARTICLE 3 



500 



$5,667,727. 



* A120-00 Tabled on April 29, 1974. First motion to take off table 
failed, May 7, 1974. Reconsidered taking off table Yes 330 No 261. 
The sum of $14,630. was then passed. 

** School Budget of $3,658,559. was passed on April 30, Motion to 
reconsider was defeated on May 6, 1974. Yes 396 No 376. 

Articles '2, 6, 7 and 3 as far as the School Budget were acted on April 
29, 1974. The motion on the floor at adjournment was for the sum of 
$3,658,559. 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:45 P.M. according to Town By-law until 
April 30, 1974 at the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School at 7:30 P.M. 



SUMMARY OF OTHER APPROPRIATIONS 



ARTICLE 12 

ARTICLE 14 
ARTICLE 16 
ARTICLE 22 
ARTICLE 23 
ARTICLE 24 
ARTICLE 27 
ARTICLE 28 
ARTICLE 29 
ARTICLE 30 

ARTICLE 31 
ARTICLE 34 
ARTICLE 40 
ARTICLE 43 



Feasibility and Site Selection Study for 

Recreation $ 5,000 

Draining and cleaning Swim Pond 5,000 

Tennis Courts at Metacomet Park 44,000 

Radios and Base Station for Highway Dept. 8,500 

Dump Truck for Street Dept. 22,500, 

Truck Chassis for Street Dept. 14,600 

Sum for Regional Refuse Disposal Committee 900 

Town Yard in back of Town Hall 1,000, 

Brochure for Industrial Land 350, 
Recreation for physically and mentally 

handicapped 1,800, 

Data Processing for Town Offices 12,000, 

Purchase of Ambulance 20,000, 

Update of Master Plan 7,500, 

Bicentennial Committee 15, 000 , 

Total of Special Appropriations 158,150, 

Total ARTICLE 3 Appropriations 5,667,727, 

Total Amount to be raised 5,825,877, 



176 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
April 30, 1974 



The meeting was called to order and after taking action on the 
remainder of the Article 3 items, the following action was taken on the 
following articles in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time 
in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 
1974, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 4, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, 
and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than 
one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

ARTICLE 4. Voted unanimously to authorize the Town Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 
1974, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 4, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within 
one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period 
of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 17. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector to use all 
means in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to 
that office. 

ARTICLE 5. Voted to authorize the Collector to use all means in 
the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to that 
office. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensa- 
tion of the following elected officers: 

Moderator, Town Clerk, Treasurer, Selectmen, Assessors, School 
Committee, Trustees of Public Library, Collector of Taxes, Planning 
Board, Park and Recreation Commissioners, Housing Authority 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 6. Voted to fix the salary and compensation of the 
following elected officers as follows: 

Moderator $ -0- 

Town Clerk 3,000. 

Treasurer 3,800. 

Selectman, Chairman 675. 

Selectman, Clerk 650. 

Selectman, 3rd Member 650. 

Assessor, Chairman 600. 

Assessor, Clerk 575. 



177 



Assessor, 3rd Member 575. 

School Committee -0- 

Trustees of Public Library -0- 

Collector of Taxes 4,400. 

Planning Board -0- 
Park and Recreation Commissioners -0- 

Housing Authority -0- 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classification of 
Positions and Pay Schedules of the Personnel Administration Plan so that 
it reads as follows: 

CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULES 
Full Time Positions 

Position Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Max. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 
*Chief Annual 12,500. to 16,500 
Sergeant Annual 10,685. 11,130. 11,690 

Patrolman Annual 8,080 8,695. 9,305. 10,020 10,685 

STREET, WATER AND SEWER DEPARTMENT 
*Supt'd't Annual 13,500. to 18,000. 
Foreman Hourly 4.10 4.35 4.60 4.85 5.15 
Equip. Oper. 

Repairman " " 3.75 3.95 4.15 4.40 4.65 
Heavy Equip. 

Oper. 
Water Tech. " " 
Lt. Equip. 
Oper. 

Laborer " " 

Snow Removal Premium: 50 percent of hourly rate for time 

worked other than normal schedule 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 
*Chief Annual 10,500. to 13,500. 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 
'''Executive Sec'y Annual 13,000. to 20,000. 
Admin. Sec'y. Annual 6,560. 6,940. 7,340. 7,770. 8,200. 
Custodian 
Town Hall Hourly 2.35 2.45 2.55 2.70 2.85 



3.55 


3.75 


3.95 


4.20 


4.45 


3.55 


3.75 


3.95 


4.20 


4.45 


3.35 


3.55 


3.75 


3.95 


4.20 


2.55 


2.65 


2.75 


2.90 


3.10 



Senior Sec'y " " 


3.00 


3.20 


3.40 


3.60 


3.80 


Coll./Bkpr./ 












Sec'y 


2.60 


2.75 


2.90 


3.05 


3.20 



Full-time employees shall receive an annual longevity payment of $50, 
after 5 years continous full-time employment plus $10. for each 
additional year of service up to a total maximum of $200. payable on 
the 2nd pay day of December. 



178 



REGULAR PART TIME POSITIONS 



Position 



Minimum 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 
Custodian 
Town Hall Hourly 2.35 
PARK & RECREATION 
Custodian Hourly 
Recreation Center 2.35 



2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Max. 



2.45 



2.45 



2.55 



2.55 



2.70 



2.70 



2.85 



2.85 



LIBRARY 

Librarian Annual 5,620. 5,950. 6,240, 
Asst. Libr. " 2,900. 3,060. 3,235, 
Children' s 
Librarian " 2,900. 3,060. 3,235, 



6,550. 
3,415. 

3,415. 



7,000, 
3,600, 

3,600, 



GENERAL 

Coll./Bkpr./ 
Sec'y. Hourly 2.60 2.75 2.90 3.05 3.20 

TAX DEPARTMENT 
Dept'y Coll. 
and Bkpr. " 2.65 2.85 3.00 3.15 3.40 

* Indicate a salaried position not subject to overtime payment 

PART TIME AND TEMPORARY POSITIONS 



Position 

Ambulance Attendant 

Ambulance Serviceman 

Animal Inspector 

Beach: 
*Water Front Director 
*Asst. Water Front Director 

^Swimming Instructor 
^Lifeguard Instructor 

*Lif eguard 

^Maintenance Man 
Skating Program Director 
Skating Supervisor 
Building Inspector 
Building Inspec. (Acting) 
Cemetery Foreman 
Clerk: Typist 
Deputy Collector 
Dog Officer 



Rate 

$3.75 per hour 

$2.50 per run, $25.00 min. per month 

$430. per year 

$1,300. to $1,600. per year 

$80. to $105. per wk. , $700. min per 

season 

$2.50 per hour 

$1.85 to $2.40 per hr. , $600. min per 

season 

$1.50 to $2.15 per hr., $500. min. per 

season 

$1.50 per hour 

$3.90 per hour 

$3.40 per hour 

$6.20 per inspec, $1,200. min. per year 

$6.20 per inspec, $160. min. per year 

$2.85 per hour 

$2. 15 to $2.85 per hour 

Fee 

$855. per year plus $1. for each deliq. 

License 



179 



Fire : 

Call Firefighters 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 
Gas Inspector 
Gas Inspector (Acting) 
Laborer 
Library: Aide 

Senior Aide 
Junior Aide 
Custodian & Maint. 
Planning Board Assistant 
Playground Counselor 
Playground Director 
Plumbing Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector (Acting) 
Police Matron 
Poll Worker 

Recreation Coordinator 
Registrar 
Registrar, Clerk 
Sanitation Inspector 
Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Secretary 
Special Police Officer 



$330. min. per year 
$ 60. min. per year 



$3.75 to $3.90 per hour 

$670. per year 

$225. per year 

$170. per year 

$170. per year 

$6.20 per inspec 

$6.20 per inspec 

$1.65 to $2.75 per hour 

$1.50 to $2.50 per hour 

$2.40 to $2.85 per hour 

$1.25 to $1.70 per hour 

$1,550. to $2,195 per year 

$2.30 to $3.15 per hour 

$25. to $40. per week 

$90. to $130. per week 

$6.20 per inspec, $900. min. per year 

$6.20 per inspec, $224. min. per year 

$2.85 to $3.35 per hour 

$2.45 per hour 

$65. to $80. per week 

$125. per year 

$300. per year 

$3.75 per inspection 

$175. per year 

$2.45 to $3.10 per hour 

$3.75 per hour 



Positions 



PART TIME AND TEMPORARY POSITIONS 
Rate 



Town Accountant $3,500. per year 

Town Counsel $2,480. to $6,200. per year 

Traffic Supervisor $2.90 to $3.40 per hour 

Tree Warden/Insect Pest Control $4.60 per hour 

Tree Climber $2.70 to $3.00 per hour 

Truck Driver $2.50 to $3.45 per hour 

Veterans' Agent $1,120. per year 

Wiring Inspector $6.20 per inspec, $545. min. 

Wiring Inspector (Acting) $6.20 per inspec, $160. min. 



per year 
per year 



When an hourly paid imployee is called in to work on an emergency 
assignment, he shall receive no less than two (2) hours pay at his 
straight time hourly rate. This does not apply to planned overtime. 

^Season is 10 weeks 

ARTICLE 7. Voted to amend the Classification of Positions & Pay Schedule 
of the Personnel Administration Plan as printed in the warrant except for 
the following changes. 



180 



PART TIME AND TEMPORARY POSITIONS 



Lifeguard Instructor 

Lifeguard 

Laborer 

Library Aide 

(Remove Junior Aide) 
Playground Counselor 
Maintenance Man 



$2.00 to $2.40 
$2.00 to $2.15 
$2.00 to $2.75 

$2.00 to $2.50 
$2.00 per hour 
Remove 



CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULES 
Full Time Positions 



Position 


Minumum 




2nd Step 


3rd Step 


4th Step 


Max. 


POLICE DEPARTMENT 














*Chief Annual 


12,500. 


to 


16,500. 








Sergeant " 


10,685. 


to 


11,130. 






11,690 


Patrolman " 


8,080. 




8,695. 


9,305 


10,020. 


10,685 


STREET, WATER AND SEWER DEPARTMENT 








*Supt'd't. Annual 13,500. 


tc 


18,000. 








Foreman Hourly 


4.10 




4.35 


4.60 


4.85 


5.15 


Equip. Oper. 














Repairman " 


3.75 




3.95 


4.15 


4.40 


4.65 


Heavy Equip. 














Operator " 


3.55 




3.75 


3.95 


4.20 


4.45 


Water Tech. M 


3.55 




3.75 


3.95 


4.20 


4.45 


Lt. Equip. 














Operator Hourly 


3.35 




3.55 


3.75 


3.95 


4.20 


Laborer " 


2.55 




2.65 


2.75 


2.90 


3.10 



Snow Removal Premium: 



50 Per cent of hourly rate for time worked 
other than normal schedule. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 
*Chief 



Annual 10,500. to 13,500. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 

*Exec. Sec'y. Annual 13,500. to 20,000. 
Admin. Sec'y " 6,560. 6,940. 7,340. 
Custodian 
Town Hall Hourly2.35 2.45 2.55 



GENERAL 

Senior Sec'y 
Coll./Bkpr./ 
Sec'y. 



3.00 



2.60 



3.20 



2.75 



3.40 



2.90 



7,770. 


8 


,200. 


2.70 




2.85 


3.60 




3.80 


3.05 




3.20 



Full-time employees shall receive an annual longevity payment of $50 
after 5 years continuous full-time employment plus $10. for each 
additional year of service up to a total maximum of $200. payable on 
the 2nd pay day of December. 



181 



REGULAR PART TIME POSITIONS 

Position Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Max. 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 
Custodian 
Town Hall Hourly 2.35 2.45 2.55 2.70 2.85 

PARK & RECREATION 
Custodian Hourly 
Recreation Center 2.35 2.45 2.55 2.70 2.85 

LIBRARY 

Librarian Annual 5,620. 5,950. 6,240. 6,550. 7,000. 
Asst. Libr. " 2,900. 3,060. 3,235. 3,415. 3,600. 
Children's 
Librarian 2,900. 3,060. 3,235. 3,415. 3,600. 

GENERAL 

Coll./Bkpr./ 
Sec'y. Hourly 2.60 2.75 2.90 3.05 3.20 

TAX DEPARTMENT 
Deputy Coll. 
and Bkpr. " 2.65 2.85 3.00 3.15 3.40 

* Indicates a salaried position not subject to overtime payment. 

PART TIME AND TEMPORARY POSITIONS 

Position Rate 

Ambulance Attendant $3.75 per hour 

Ambulance Serviceman $2.50 per run, $25. min. per month 

Animal Inspector $430. per year 

Beach: 

*Water Front Director $1,300. to $1,600. per year 

*Asst. Water Front Director $80. to $105. per week, $700. min, per 

season 
*Swimming Instructor $2.50 per hour 
^Lifeguard Instructor $2.00 to $2.40 per hour, $600. min. per 

season 
^Lifeguard $2.00 to $2.15 per hour; $500. min. per 

season 
Skating Program Director $3.90 per hour 
Skating Supervisor $3.40 per hour 

Building Inspector $6.20 per inspec. , $1,200. min. per year 

Building Inspector (Acting) $6.20 per inspec, $160. min. per year 
Cemetery Foreman $2.85 per hour 

Clerk: Typist $2.15 to $2.85 per hour 

Deputy Collector Fee 

Dog Officer $855. per year plus $1. for each deliquent 

license 
Fire: Call Firefighters $3.75 to $3.90 per hour 
Deputy Chief $670. per year 



182 



Position 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 
Gas Inspector 
Gas Inspector (Acting) 
Laborer 
Library: Aide 

Senior Aide 
Custodian & Mainten. 
Planning Board Assistant 
Playground Counselor 
Playground Director 
Plumbing Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector (Acting) 
Police Matron 
Poll Worker 

Recreation Coordinator 
Registrar 
Registrar, Clerk 
Sanitation Inspector 
Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Secretary 
Special Police Officer 



Rate 

$225. per year 

$170. per year 

$170 per year 

$6.20 per inspection, $330. min. per year 

$6.20 per inspection, $60* min. per year 

$2.00 to $2.75 per hour 

$2.00 to $2.50 per hour 

$2.40 to $2.85 per hour 

$1,550. to $2,195 per year 

$2.30 to $3.15 per hour 

$2.00 per hour 

$90. to $130. per week 

$6.20 per inspect., $900. min. per year 

$6.20 per inspect., $225. min. per year 

$2.85 to $3.35 per hour 

$2.45 per hour 

$65. to $80 per week 

$125. per year 

$300. per year 

$3.75 per inspection 

$175. per year 

$2.45 to $3.10 per hour 

$3. 75 per hour 



PART TIME AND TEMPORARY POSITIONS 



Positions 

Town Accountant 

Town Counsel 

Traffic Supervisor 

Tree Warden/Insect Control 

Tree Climber 

Truck Driver 

Veterans' Agent 

Wiring Inspector 

Wiring Inspector (Acting) 



Rate 

$3,500. per year 

$2,480. to $6,200. per year 

$2.90 to $3.40 per hour 

$4.60 per hour 

$2.70 to $4.30 per hour 

$2.50 to $3.45 per hour 

$1,120 per year 

$6.20 per inspect., $545. min. 

$6.20 per inspect., $160. min. 



per year 
per year 



When an hourly paid employee is called in to work on an emergency 
assignment, he shall receive no less than two (2) hours pay at his 
straight time hourly rate. This does not apply to planned overtime. 

^Season is 10 weeks. 

ARTICLE 8. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer and/or borrow for engineering and construction of a 
permanent well and pumping station and for connecting same to the 
existing water system or take any action relative thereto. 

ARTICLE 8. Voted that the sum of Two Hundred Fifty Thousand 
Dollars ($250,000.) be appropriated for the purpose of this article 
and to meet that appropriation, Twenty-Six Thousand Twelve Dollars 
and Four Cents ($26,012.04) be transferred from the unexpended 
balance of Article 4 of Special Town Meeting of November 11, 1965 
and the sum of Two Hundred Twenty-Three Thousand Nine Hundred 



183 



Eighty Seven Dollars and Ninety-Six Cents ($223,987.96) be trans- 
ferred from the federal revenue sharing account from the following 
entitlement periods: Thirteen Thousand Two Hundred- forty Dollars 
and Fourteen Cents ($13,240.14) from the entitlement period ending 
December 31, 1972; Forty-Nine Thousand One Hundred Fifty-Three 
Dollars and Seventy-Nine Cents ($49,153.79) from the entitlement 
period ending June 30, 1973; One Hundred Twenty-Six Thousand Five 
Hundred Eighty-Four Dollars and Seven Cents ($126,584.07) from the 
entitlement period ending June 30, 1974; and Thirty-Five Thousand 
Nine Dollars and Ninety-Six Cents ($35,009.96) from the entitlement 
period ending June 30, 1975, and that the Water and Sewer Board and 
the Board of Selectmen be authorized to enter into and accept all 
contracts for the purposes of this article. 

ARTICLE 9. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer and/or borrow for the installation of an 8" main in 
Forest Street from the existing 8" main in Forest Street to the existing 
8" main in Granite Street, or take any action relative thereto. 

ARTICLE 9. Voted the sum of Twenty Thousand Dollars ($20,000.) be 
appropriated for the purposes of this article and to meet the 
appropriation the sum of Twenty Thousand Dollars ($20,000) be 
transferred from the entitlement period ending June 30, 1974 of the 
federal revenue sharing act and that the Water and Sewer Board be 
authorized to enter into and accept all contracts for the purposes 
of this article. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and/or the Conservation Commission to acquire by easement, 
gift, purchase or eminent domain the undeveloped land on Noon Hill 
bounded in general by the Stop River, Causeway Street, Orchard Street 
and Indian Hill Road and vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
for the purposes of this article and that the Board of Selectmen and/or 
the Conservation Commission be authorized to apply for and receive any 
Federal and State reimbursement funds that may be available, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

ARTICLE 10. Voted unanimously that the Board of Selectmen of the 
Town be authorized to acquire by gift, purchase or eminent domain, 
for conservation and outdoor recreation purposes, the fee or any 
lesser interest in the following parcels of land: 

Lot 42 on Map 2, Lots 13, 21 & 22, on Map 8, Lots 3, 4, & 5 
on Map 9, Lot 12 on Map 10, Lot 16 on Map 14, and Lot 1 on 
Map 16 of the 'Med field. Assessors Maps; 

and that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to develop said land 
for said purposes and to enter into contracts and agreements with 
the Trustees of Reservations for joint development of the above 
land with adjacent land owned by the Trustees; and that the sum of 
One Million One Hundred Thirty Thousand Four Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($1,130,450.) is appropriated therefore; that to meet this appro- 
priation the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is 



184 



authorized to borrow One Million Ninety-Six Thousand Four Hundred 
Fifty Dollars ($1,096,450.) under Chapter 44 of the General Laws, 
as amended, and the sum of Thirty-Four Thousand Dollars ($34,000.) 
be transferred from the Stabilization Fund; and that the Board of 
Selectmen are authorized to apply and contract for federal and state 
aid and aid from any other public or private sources for the 
purposes of this vote, provided that the total authorized appropria- 
tion shall be reduced by the amount of any state or federal grants 
received. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and/or the Conservation Commission to acquire by easement, gift, 
purchase or eminent domain the undeveloped land owned now or formerly by 
Hoover Realty Trust, Calvin W. and Carole Colwell, Trustees, contiguous 
to land in the previous article on Noon Hill, and vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the purposes of this article and that the Board 
of Selectmen and/or the Conservation Commission be authorized to apply 
for and receive any Federal and State reimbursement funds that may be 
available, or take any action relative thereto. 

ARTICLE 11. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 12. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer from available funds for a feasibility and 
site selection study for a swimming facility, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 12. Voted that the sum of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.) 
be raised and appropriated for a feasibility and site selection study 
for a swimming facility and related recreational facilities for the 
Town. 

ARTICLE 13. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer from available funds for the purpose of 
drilling a well to provide 25,000 to 50,000 gallons of water per day, 
purchasing and installing a pump and providing suitable drainage 
facilities at Corporal Stephen Hinkley Memorial Park, or do or act any- 
thing relative thereto. 

ARTICLE 13. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 14. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer from available funds for the purpose of 
draining and cleaning Corporal Stephen Hinkley Memorial Park pond, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

ARTICLE 14. Voted that the sum of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000) 
be raised and appropriated for the purpose of draining and 
cleaning Corporal Stephen Hinkley Memorial Park pond. 

ARTICLE 15. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer from available funds for the purpose of 
improving Metacomet Park, or take any action relative thereto. 



185 



ARTICLE 15. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 16. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer from available funds for the construction of 
tennis courts, or take any action relative thereto. 

ARTICLE 16. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Forty-Four 
Thousand Dollars ($44,000.) for the construction of four tennis 
courts at Metacomet Park. 

YES 279 

NO 243 

NOTE: Reconsideration on May 14, failed. 

YES 110 
NO 183 

ARTICLE 17. To see what sum the town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer and/or borrow for the purposes of installing sewers in 
the following area: 

Longmeadow Road 
Stonybrook Road 
Woodfall Road 
Spring Valley Road 
Evergreen Way 

ARTICLE 17. Voted to dismiss this article. 



RESOLUTION: 



Be it resolved that it is the sense of this meeting 
due to the serious problems with on-lot sewerage on 
the following streets: 



Longmeadow Road 
Stonybrook Road 
Woodfall Road 
Spring Valley Road 
Evergreen Way 

That the first consideration be given to said streets 
for the next extension of street sewers for the Town's 
Sewer System. 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:45 P.M. Voted to reconvene May 6, 1974 
immediately following Special Town Meeting called for 7:30 P.M. 



Nancy J. PtizAton 

Nancy J. Preston,- Town Clerk 



186 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
May 6, 1974 



The meeting was called to order on May 6, 1974 at 8:15 P.M. at the 
Amos Kingsbury High School Gymnasium. 

The first order of Business was the reconsideration of the School 
Budget which failed. 

YES 396 
NO 376 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town of Medfield will vote to adopt the 
following leash law: 

DOG CONTROL 

Section 1. Impounding, Release and Disposition of Dogs 

A. Dog officers shall be on duty during the hours of 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 
p.m. seven days a week and shall cause a dog to be impounded for any 
one of the following causes: 

(1) If found without a license when a license is required by law; 

(2) If found at large; 

(3) For having bitten, injured or physically molested any person; 

(4) For having bitten or injured any domestic animal; 

(5) For chasing any vehicle (including bicycles) on a public way or 
open to public traffic in the town; 

(6) For repeatedly causing a nuisance such as, but not limited to, 
barking, littering, or defecating on sidewalks. 

B. The owner or keeper may obtain the release of an impounded dog as 
follows: 

(1) In the case of a violation of s.lA(l), upon obtaining a license 
as required by law and by payment of a late filing fee; 

(2) In the case of a violation of subparagraphs (2) through (6), 
inclusive, of S.1A., upon the agreement of the owner or keeper 
to undertake such restriction or control of the dog as the dog 
officer shall require; 

(3) In addition to compliance with subparagraphs (1) and (2) of this 
paragraph B, all pound fees and fines, if any, must be paid 
before the dog is released. 

C. Not later than two days after the impounding of any dog, the owner or 
keeper shall be notified, or if the owner or keeper of the dog is 
unknown, or, after reasonable efforts, is not contacted, written 
notice shall then be posted for ten consecutive days on a K-9 bulle- 
tin board in the office of the Town Clerk describing the dog and the 
place and time of taking. 

D. Dogs impounded and unclaimed by the owner or keeper after such a ten 
day period shall be disposed of in accordance with the provisions 

of Mass. Gen. Laws Chapter 140, section 151A. 

Section 2. Control of Dogs in Oestrus Cycle 

If the dog officer determines that a dog is in her oestrus cycle, (even 

when confined to the property of the owner or keeper), is attracting 

187 






other dogs to the area, which condition causes disturbance on or damage 
to neighboring property or public areas, he may impound the dog for the 
duration of the oestrus cycle, releasing it thereafter to the owner or 
keeper upon the payment of pound fees; or the dog officer may require 
the owner or keeper to place and keep such dog, while in such cycle, in 
a kennel or to remove it from the area so that the nuisance is abated. 

Section 3. Restraint of Dogs 

Any persons owning or harboring a dog shall not suffer or allow it to run 
at large in any of the streets or public ways, or places in the Town of 
Medfield, or upon the premises of any one other than the owner or keeper, 
unless the owner or occupant of such premises grants permission. Under 
no circumstances shall a dog, even on a leash, be allowed on private 
property, unless specific permission has been granted. No dog shall be 
permitted in any public place or street within the Town of Medfield unless 
it is effectively restrained by a chain or leash not exceeding 7 feet in 
length and is attended by a person of adequate age and discretion to 
properly control its actions. 

Section 4. Penalty 

A. No fine shall be assessed for the first violation in any one calendar 
year of this Article; subsequent violations of this Article in any 
one calendar year shall cause the owner or keeper of such dog to be 
penalized by a fine of $10.00 for each subsequent violation in such 
year. 

B. The late filing fee shall be $3.00. 

Section 5. Definitions 

A. "At Large" means a dog which is (i) unaccompanied by a person of 
adequate age and discretion to properly control its actions and (ii) 
is unrestrained by a leash or chain of less than seven feet in length, 

B. "Oestrus Cycle" is the technical term for the common expression "in 
heat." 

ARTICLE 18. Amended: 

Section 1A. Dog Officers changed to One full time and one part-time 

Section 1A. On duty changed to on call. 

Section 1C. Change 10 days to 5 days. 

Section ID. Change 10 days to 5 days. 

Section 5. Definitions: Add C- "On Call" shall be defined as 

being available and responding within a reasonable 

period of time. 

ARTICLE 18. Voted to adopt the following leash law: 

DOG CONTROL 

Section 1. Impounding, Release and Disposition of Dogs 

A. One full-time and one part-time dog officer shall be on call during 
the hours of 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. seven days a week and shall 
cause a dog to be impounded for any one of the following causes : 

(1) If found without a license when a license is required by law; 

(2) If found at large; 



188 



(3) For having bitten, injured or physically molested any person; 

(4) For having bitten or injured any domestic animal; 

(5) For chasing any vehicle (including bicycles) on a public way 
or open to public traffic in the town; 

(6) For repeatedly causing a nuisance such as, but not limited to, 
barking, littering, or defecating on sidewalks. 

B. The owner or keeper may obtain the release of an impounded dog as 
fallows: 

(1) In the case of a violation of s.lA(l), upon obtaining a license 
required by law and by payment of a late filing fee; 

(2) In the case of a violation of subparagraphs (2) through (6), 
inclusive, of s.lA., upon the agreement of the owner or keeper 
to undertake such restriction or control of the dog as the dog 
officer shall require; 

(3) In addition to compliance with subparagraphs (1) and (2) of this 
paragraph B. all pound fees and fines, if any, must be paid 
before the dog is released. 

C. Not later than two days after the impounding of any dog, the owner 
or keeper shall be notified, or if the owner or keeper of the dog is 
unknown, or, after reasonable efforts, is not contacted, written 
notice shall then be posted for 5 consecutive days on a K.-9 bulletin 
board in the office of the Town Clerk describing the dog and the 
place and time of taking. 

D. Dogs impounded and unclaimed by the owner or keeper after such a five 
day period, shall be disposed of in accordance with the provisions 

of Mass. Gen. Laws Chapter 140, Section 151A. 

Section 2. Control of Dogs in Oestrus Cycle 

If the dog officer determines that a dog in her oestrus cycle, (even 
when confined to the property of the owner or keeper), is attracting 
other dogs to the area which condition causes disturbance on or damage 
to neighboring property or public areas, he may impound the dog for the 
duration of the oestrus cycle, releasing it thereafter to the owner or 
keeper upon the payment of pound fees; or the dog officer may require the 
owner or keeper to place and keep such dog, while in such cycle, in a 
kennel or to remove it from the area so that the nuisance is abated. 

Section 3. Restraint of Dogs 

Any persons owning or harboring a dog shall not suffer or allow it to 
run at large in any of the streets or public ways, or places in the Town 
of Medfield, or upon the premises of anyone other than the owner or 
keeper, unless the owner or occupant of such premises grants permission. 
Under no circumstances shall a dog, even on a leash, be allowed on 
private property, unless specific permission has been granted. No dog 
shall be permitted in any public place or street within the Town of 
Medfield unless it is effectively restrained by a chain or leash not 
exceeding 7 feet in length and is attended by a person of adequate age 
and descretion to properly control its actions. 

Section 4. Penalty 

A. No fine shall be assessed for the first violation in any one calendar 

year of this Article; subsequent violations of this Article in any 
one calendar year shall cause the owner or keeper of such dog to be 
penalized by a fine of $10.00 for each subsequent violation in such 
year. 

189 



B. The late filing fee shall be $3.00. 

Section 5. Definitions 

A. "At Large" means a dog which is (i) unaccompanied by a person of 

adequate age and discretion to properly control its actions and 
(ii) is unrestrained by a leash or chain of less than seven feet 
in length. 

B. "Oestrus Cycle" is the technical term for the common expression 
"in heat" 

C. "On Call" shall be defined as being available and responding within 
a reasonable period of time. 

YES 352 
NO 326 

A motion to reconsider Article 18 by secret ballot was on the floor. The 
meeting was adjourned at 10:45 p.m. to reconvene May 7, 1974 at 7:30 p.m. 

Nancy J. Vn<ZAtovi f 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
May 7, 1974 



The meeting was called to order at 7:45 p.m. 

The first order of business was the reconsideration of Article 18 by 
secret ballot. The motion was defeated by a vote of: 

YES 302 
NO 331 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the 
following named streets, or parts thereof: 

Camelot Lane Station 0+0 to 4+84.17 

Erik Road Station 0+0 to 10+0.0 

Indian Hill Road Station 14+0.0 to 38+0 

Nauset Street Station 0+0 to 13+55.43 

Partridge Road Station 0+0 to 13+60 

Mohawk Road Station 0+0 to 6+02.17 

Penobscot Street Station 0+0 to 5+07.47 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to 
in the Orders of layout on file with the Town Clerk's Office and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or other- 
wise, such rights, titles and easements, including drainage easements 
as may be necessary to accomplish such purposes, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 



190 



ARTICLE 19. Voted unanimously to accept as public ways the follow- 
ing named streets, or parts thereof: 

Camelot Lane Station 0+0 to 4+84.17 
Erik Road Station 0+0 to 10+0.0 

Partridge Road Station 0+25.73 to 13+63.03 

and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain 
or otherwise, such rights, titles and easements, including drainage 
easements, as may be necessary to accomplish such purposes. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 123.0 Electrical 
and Gas Installation, of the Building Code so that it reads as follows: 

"All electrical and gas installations shall conform to the applicable 
electrical and gas codes recommended by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts except that the minimum permitted size of aluminum 
wire in electrical installation is Size 8." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 20. Voted to . amend Section 123.0, Electrical and Gas 
Installations, of the Building Code so that it reads as follows: 

"All electrical and gas installations shall conform to the 
applicable electrical and gas codes recommended by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts except that the minimum permitted 
size of aluminum wire in electrical installations is size 8." 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Transporta- 
tion Aid Account the sum of Fifty-five Thousand, Nine Hundred and Fifty- 
two Dollars ($55,952.) received from the Commonwealth in accordance with 
the provisions of Chapter 1140 of the Acts of 1973 for the reconstruction 
of a section of West Street and a section of Bridge Street and to author- 
ize the Selectmen to enter into any and all contracts necessary or 
incidental thereto; said funds may be used with any additional funds that 
may be allotted by State and/or County, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 21. Voted that the sum of Fifty-five Thousand, Nine 
Hundred Fifty-two Dollars ($55,952.) be transferred from the 
Transportation Aid Account received from the Commonwealth in 
accordance with the provisions of Chapter 1140 of the Acts of 1973 
for the reconstruction of a section of West Street and a section on 
Bridge Street and that the Selectmen be authorized to enterinto 
any and all contracts necessary or incidental thereto, said funds 
to be used in conjunction with any additional funds that may be 
allotted by the State and/or County. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money for purchasing radios and base station for the Highway, Water 
and Sewer Departments or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



191 



ARTICLE 22. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Eight 
Thousand, Five Hundred Dollars ($8,500.) for the purchase of radios 
and base station for the Highway, Water and Sewer Departments. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate Twenty- 
two Thousand, Five Hundred Dollars ($22,500.) for the purchase of a dump 
truck for the use of the Street Department and authorize the Selectmen 
to trade a 1965 White as part of the purchase price or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 23. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Twenty-two 
Thousand, Five Hundred Dollars, ($22,500.) for the purchase of a 
dump truck for the Street Department and authorize the Selectmen 
to trade a 1965 White as part of the purchase price. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money for the purchase of a truck chassis, for transfer of a body and 
hoist and the purchase of a self unloading sand spreader for the use of 
the Street Department and authorize the Selectmen to trade a 1967 Chevro- 
let Truck Chassis as part of the purchase price or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 24. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Fourteen 
Thousand, Six Hundred Dollars ($14,600.) for the purchase of a 
truck chassis, for transfer of a body and hoist and the purchase of 
a self unloading sand spreader for the use of the Street Department 
and authorize the Selectmen to trade a 1967 Chevrolet Truck Chassis 
as part of the purchase price. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate Five 
Thousand, Two Hundred Dollars ($5,200.) for the purchase of an air com- 
pressor for the use of the Water, Sewer and Street Departments or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 25. Voted to dismiss this Article. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money for the purchase of a second hand truck chassis and a self 
unloading sand spreader for the use of the Street Department or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 26. Voted to dismiss this Article. 

ARTICLE 27. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer from available funds and/or borrow for the expenses of 
the Regional Refuse Disposal Committee, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 27. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Nine Hundred 
Dollars ($900.) for the expenses of the Regional Refuse Disposal 
Committee. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money for the purpose of converting the Town Yard in the rear of the 

192 



Town Hall to a municipal parking area, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 28. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of One Thousand 
Dollars ($1,000.) for the purpose of converting the Town Yard in the 
rear of the Town Hall to a municipal parking area. 

ARTICLE 29. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate for the composition, printing and mailing of a promotional 
brochure describing the available industrially zoned land in the town, 
and for other expenses incidental thereto, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

ARTICLE 29. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Three 
Hundred Fifty Dollars ($350.) for the composition, printing and 
mailing of a promotional brochure describing the available indus- 
trially zoned land in the town, and for other expenses incidental 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
transfer a sum of money for the purpose of providing recreation for the 
physically and mentally handicapped, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 30. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of One Thousand, 
Eight Hundred Dollars ($1,800.) for the purpose of providing recrea- 
tion for the physically and mentally handicapped. 

ARTICLE 31. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer or borrow for the purposes of providing additional data 
processing capabilities for the town, or take any action relative thereto. 

ARTICLE 31. Voted that the sum of Twelve Thousand Dollars ($12,000.) 
be raised and appropriated for the lease with an option to purchase 
of data processing equipment in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws Chapter 40, Section 4 and that the Selectmen be author- 
ized to enter into a lease agreement for a period not exceeding five 
years. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money to establish and maintain a municipal buildings insurance fund, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 32. Voted to dismiss this Article. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article II of the By- 
laws of the Town of Medfield by adding a section as follows: 

"Section 25. The Town may join the Commonwealth in purchasing in 
quantity various items, materials, supplies, or equipment, or author- 
ize the Commonwealth to make such purchases in its behalf, pursuant 
to the provisions of G.L. c.7, s.22A as now or hereafter amended. 
Such purchases shall not be subject to the requirements of Section 6 
and Section 21 of Article IT. Town Administration and Finance of the 
Town of Medfield By-laws. 1 ' 

193 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 33. Voted to amend Article II of the By-laws of the Town 
of Medfield by adding a section as follows: 

" Section 25 . The Town may join the Commonwealth in purchasing 
in quantity various items, materials, supplies, or equipment 
or authorize the Commonwealth to make such purchases in its 
behalf, pursuant to the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 7, 
Section 22 A as now or hereafter amended. Such purchases shall 
not be subject to the requirements of Section 6 and Section 21 
of Article II Town Administration and Finance of the Town of 
Medfield By-laws." 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
transfer from available funds and/or borrow a sum of money to purchase 
and equip an ambulance and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply 
for and receive funds from the Federal or State governments or any other 
source toward the purchase price and to trade or sell the present ambu- 
lance or take any other action relative thereto. 

ARTICLE 34. Voted that the sum of Twenty Thousand Dollars ($20,000.) 
be raised and appropriated for the purchase and equipping of an 
ambulance and that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to apply 
for and receive funds from the federal or state governments or any 
other source toward the purchase and to trade or sell the present 
ambulance. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to amend the agreement 
establishing the Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School District 
to include the Town of Seekonk, and to delete references to the towns of 
Dover, Plainville and Wrentham in accordance with a proposal filed with 
the Selectmen by the Committee for said district, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 35. Voted to amend the agreement establishing the Tri- 
County Regional Vocational Technical School District to include the Town 
of Seekonk, and to delete references to the towns of Dover, Plainville 
and Wrentham in accordance with a proposal filed with the Selectmen by 
the Committee for said district. 

ARTICLE 36. To see what number the Town will vote as a quorum for town 
meetings, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 36. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-laws as 
follows: 

1. Amend Section 5 by substituting for Section 5.4.1.5. the following: 

5.4.1.5. Open area residential developement (See Section 13. 10. 2. a) 
SP-SP-SP-SP-NO-NO-NO 



194 



S. Amend Section 13 by substituting for 13. 10. 2. a the following: 

13. 10. 2. a For Open Area Residential Development of land subject, 
however to the following terms and conditions: 

(1) For the purpose of encouraging the preservation of open space 
and promoting the more efficient use of land in harmony with 
its natural features and within the general intent of the Zoning 
By-law, and to protect and promote the health, safety, convenience 
and general welfare of the inhabitants of the Town, an owner or 
owners of a tract of land, may, in connection with the sub- 
mission of a subdivision plan for Planning Board approval under 
the Subdivision Control Law, make application to the Board of 
Appeals for a Special Permit excepting his plan from the lot 

size and yard dimension regulations as required in the Zoning 
By-law. In no event, however, shall such permit operate as an 
exception from any other provision of this by-law. 

The owner or such agent shall at the same time file a copy of 
the application with all accompanying plans and Environmental 
Impact Statement with the Board of Health, the Water and 
Sewerage Board, the Conservation Commission and the Planning 
Board, which Boards shall, within thirty days from the date of 
receipt of^ such documents by them, file their written recommen- 
dations concerning said applications with the Board of Appeals. 
If no such recommendations are filed by any Board within thirty 
days, said Board shall have been deemed to have no recommenda- 
tions on the application. 

(2) After notice and public hearing, and after due consideration of 
recommendations required to be filed, the Board may grant such a 
permit for residential use provided that: 

(i) It finds that the proposed plan will promote the purposes of 
this section; and 

(ii) Not less than 25% of the area of the tract, exclusive of 
land set aside 'for road area and parking area, shall be 
Open Land; and 

(iii)The maximum number of lots permitted on a given piece of 
land shall be determined by reducing the total acreage of 
the proposed subdivision by the area of ponds as shown on 
Town of Medfield zoning map, but not deducting for street 
right-of-way, and by dividing the remaining area by the 
minimum lot area requirements of the zoning district in 
which the subdivision is to be located; and 

(iv) The size of the tract of land is not less than ten times 
the minimum lot size permitted in the Zoning District in 
which the tract is located and land area of not more than 
fifty per cent of the open land in the tract may be Flood 
Plain District, Watershed Protection District, or have a 
greater than twenty per cent slope; and 

195 



(v) The entire development shall be serviced with a public water 
supply and a public sewer or an onsite sewage disposal system 
capable of processing in excess of 2,000 gallons of sewage 
effluent per day and to which all units in the development 
shall be connected and which shall be approved by the Board 
of Health and the Water & Sewerage Board; and 

(vi) To insure the protection of existing residences, proposed 
lots abutting lots with existing single family residences 
shall conform to the area requirements of the adjacent zone. 
The Board of Appeals may substitute a requirement for a 
buffer zone which shall be at least fifty feet in width for 
the protection of the abutting lots; and 

(vii) All lots adjoining existing ways shall meet all existing 

regulations for zoning districts in which the lots are located 
Land adjoining existing ways may be used for open land, 
provided that its minimum dimension is fifty feet; and 

(viii) Minimum lot size shall be 12,000 square feet area, 100-foot 

width, 100-foot depth, 20-foot front yard, 12-foot side yards 
and 30-foot rear yard. 

(3) Open Land shall be: 

(i) Owned by a membership corporation, trust, or association 

whose members are all the owners or occupants of the dwelling 
units in the tract, by the Town or otherwise as the Board may 
approve; and 

(ii) Restricted by a conservation restriction as defined in General 
Laws, Chapter 184, Sections 31, 32 and 33, running to the 
Town appropriate to retaining the Open Land predominately 
< in its natural scenic, and open condition in such form as 
shall be approved by the Conservation Commission, the Planning 
Board, and the Board of Selectmen. The applicant shall pro- 
vide satisfactory assurance that such conservation restriction, 
following approvals, has been properly recorded in the 
appropriate Registry of Deeds or Registry District and the 
interest in land thereby created is not subject to any 
mortgage, security interest, lien or encumbrance of any kind 
other than the aforesaid conservation restriction; and 

(iii) Further restricted by covenants in deeds to all grantees 

in the tract for recreational, agricultural, conservation, 
or park uses on which no building may be erected more than 
fifteen feet in height and only incidental to the foregoing 
uses; and 

(iv) Open to such uses by at least the owners and occupants of 
the dwelling units in the tract; and 

(v) Open to Town officials for purposes of maintaining public 
facilities; and 

i 

196 



(vi) Subject to such furthur restrictions and conditions as the 
Board may impose. 

« 

(4) A special permit for a cluster development issued hereunder by the 
Board of Appeals is primarily an authorization for the use of lots 
which have less than the normal lot size and yard dimension. Sub- 
sequent approval by the Planning Board of such portions of the 
development as constitute a subdivision Control Law, including 
approval of the street and utility systems. A favorable recommenda- 
tion by the Planning Board that the special permit be issued shall 
not, therefore, be deemed to either constitute subdivision approval 
under the Subdivision Control Law of the Subdivision Rules and 
Regulations or imply that such approval will be given. 

(5) Consistant with the general purposes of this Zoning By-law and the 
specific purposes of this section, the Planning Board may recommend, 
and the Board may impose, as conditions to the approval of a permit 
hereunder such provisions as to parking, loading, road construction 
and sidewalks, community service and recreational facilities, 
screening, and care and maintenance of Open Land as may be deemed 
advisable for the protection and well-being of the occupants of 
dwelling units in the tract and of the inhabitants of the Town. 

(6) No lot shown on a plan for which a permit is granted under this 
section may be further subdivided, and a notation to this effect 
shall be shown upon the subdivision plan recorded with the Registry 
of Deeds or Registry District. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 37. Voted that this article be adopted as printed in the 
warrant except for the following changes: 

Change 13 . 10.2 .a-Paragraph (1) by adding to the sixth line following 
the words "owner or owners" to words "or their agent" 

and 

13. 10. 2 . a-Paragraph (3) Section (ii) by adding in the next to the 
last line following the words "lien or" the words "other monetary" 

ARTICLE 37. Voted to amend the Zoning By-law as follows: 

1. Amend Section 5 by substituting for Section 5.4.1.5. the following: 

5.4.1.5. Open area residential development (See Section 13. 10. 2. a) 
SP-SP-SP-SP-NO-NO-NO 

2. Amend Section 13 by substituting for 13. 10. 2. a the following: 

13. 10. 2. a For Open Area Residential Development of land subject, 
however, to the following terms and conditions: 



197 



(1) For the purpose of encouraging the preservation of open space 
and promoting the more efficient use of land in harmony with 
its natural features and within the general intent of the 
Zoning By-law and to protect and promote the health, safety, 
convenience and general welfare of the inhabitants of the Town, 
an owner or owners or their agent of a tract of land, may, in 
connection with the submission of a subdivision plan for Plann- 
ing Board approval under the Subdivision Control Law, make 
application to the Board of Appeals for a Special Permit ex- 
cepting his plan from the lot size and yard dimension regula- 
tions as required in the Zoning By-law. In no event, however, 
shall such permit operate as an exception from any other pro- 1 
vision of this by-law. 

The owner or such agent shall at the same time file a copy of 
the application with all accompanying plans and Environmental 
Impact Statement with the Board of Healthy, the Water and Sewer- 
age Board, the Conservation Commission and the Planning Board, 
which Boards shall, within thirty days from the date of receipt 
of such documents by them file their written recommendations 
concerning said applications with the Board of Appeals. If no 
such recommendations are filed by any board within thirty days, 
said board shall have been deemed to have no recommendations 
on the application. 

(2) After notice and public hearing, and after due consideration of 
recommendations required to be filed, the Board may grant such 
a permit for residential use provided that: 

(i) It finds that the proposed plan will promote the purposes 
of this section; and 

(ii) Not less than 25% of the area of the tract, exclusive of 
land set aside for road area and parking area, shall be 
Open Land; and 

(iii) The maximum number of lots permitted on a given piece of 
land shall be determined by reducing the total acreage 
of the proposed sub-division by the area of ponds as 
shown on Town of Medfield zoning map, but not deducting 
for street right-of-way, and by dividing the remaining 
area by the minimum lot area requirements of the zoning 
district in which the subdivision is to be located^ and 

(iv) The size of the tract of land is not less than ten 'times 
the minimum lot size permitted in the Zoning District in 
which the tract is located and land area of not more 
than fifty per cent of the open land in the tract may be 
Flood Plain District, Watershed Protection District, or 
have a greater than twenty per cent slope; and 

(v) The entire development shall be serviced with a public 
water supply and a public sewer or an on-site sewage 

198 



disposal system capable of processing in excess of 
2,000 gallons of sewage effluent per day and to which 
all units in the development shall be connected and which 
shall be approved by the Board of Health and the Water & 
Sewerage Board; and 

(vi) To insure the protection of existing residences, proposed 
lots abutting lots with existing single family residences 
shall conform to the area requirements of the adjacent 
zone. The Board of Appeals may substitute a requirement 
for a buffer zone which shall be at least fifty feet in 
width for the protection of the abutting lots; and 

(vii) All lots adjoining existing ways shall meet all existing 
regulations for zoning districts in which the lots are 
located. Land adjoining existing ways may be used for 
open land, provided that its minimum dimension is fifty 
feet; and 

(viii) Minimum lot size shall be 12,000 square feet area, 100- 
foot width, 100-foot depth, 20-foot front yard, 12-foot 
side yards and 30-foot rear yardv 

(3) Open Land shall be: 

(i) Owned by a membership corporation, trust, or association 
whose members are all the owners or occupants of the 
dwelling units in the tract, by the Town, or otherwise as 
as the Board may approve; and 

(ii) Restricted by a conservation restriction as defined in 

General Laws, Chapter 184, Sections 31, 32 and 33, running 
to the Town appropriate to retaining the Open Land pre- 
dominately in its natural scenic, and open condition in 
such form as shall be approved by the Conservation Commi- 
sion, the Planning Board, and the Board of Selectmen. 
The applicant shall provide satisfactory assurance that 
such conservation restriction, following approvals, has 
been properly recorded in the appropriate Registry of 
Deeds, or Registry District and the interest in land 
thereby created is not subject to any mortgage, security 
interest, lien or other monetary encumbrance of any kind 
other than the aforesaid conservation restriction; and 

(iii) Further restricted by covenants in deeds to all grantees 

in the tract for recreational, agricultural, conservation, 
or park use which no building may be erected more than 
fifteen feet in height and only incidental to the fore- 
going uses; and 

(iv) Open to such uses by at least the owners and occupants 
of the dwelling units in the tract; and 



199 



(v) Open to Town officials for purposes of maintaining public 
facilities; and 

(vi) Subject to such further restrictions and conditions as the 
Board may impose. 

(4) A special permit for a cluster development issued here-under by the 
Board of Appeals is primarily an authorization for the use of lots 
which have less than the normal lot size and yard dimension. Sub- 
sequent approval by the Planning Board of such portions of the 
development as constitute a subdivision will be required as set 
forth in the Subdivision Control Law, including approval of the 
street and utility systems. A favorable recommendation by the 
Planning Board that the special permit be issued shall not, there- 
fore, be deemed to either constitute subdivision approval under the 
Subdivision Control Law of the Subdivision Rules & Regulations or 

imply that such approval will be given. 

(5) Consistent with the general purposes of this Zoning By-law and the 
specific purposes of this section, the Planning Board may recommend, 
and the Board may impose, as conditions to the approval of a permit 
hereunder such provisions as to parking, loading, road construction 
and sidewalks, community service and recreational facilities, 
screening, and care and maintenance of Open Land as may be deemed 
advisable for the protection and well-being of the occupants of 
dwelling units in the tract and of the inhabitants of the Town. 

(6) No lot shown on a plan for which a Permit is granted under this 
section may be further subdivided, and a notation to this effect 
shall be shown upon the subdivision plan recorded with the Registry 
of Deeds or Registry District. 

YES 275 
NO 9 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law as 
follows: 

1. Amend Section 5 by inserting in "5.4 Table of use Regulations" 
a new classification under Residential as follows: 

5.4.1.6. Open area residential development (See Section 13.10.2b) 
SP- SP- SP- SP-NO- NO-NO . 

2. Amend Section 13 by inserting in "13.10 Special Permits" a 
new subsection 13. 10. 2. b as follows: 

13. 10. 2. b) For the Open Area Residential Development of land 
subject, however, to the following terms and conditions: 

(1) For the purpose of encouraging the preservation of open space 

and promoting the more efficient use of land in harmony with its 
natural features and within the general intent of the Zoning 



200 



By-Law, and to protect and promote the health, safety, con- 
venience and general welfare of the inhabitants of the Town, 
an owner or owners of a tract of land, or a duly authorized 
agent thereof, may, in connection with the submission of a 
subdivision plan for Planning Board approval under the Sub- 
division Control Law, or, if no such approval is required, 
after consultation with the Planning Board, make application 
to the Board of Appeals for a special permit excepting his 
plan from the area, bulk, and other regulations except height 
of Section 6 and the off-street parking and loading regulations 
of Section 8 of the Zoning By-law. The owner or such agent 
shall at the same time file a copy of the application (and all 
accompanying plans) with the Board of Health, the Water and 
Sewerage Board, and the Conservation Committee. 

(2) After notice and public hearing, and after due consideration 
of the report and recommendation of the Planning Board, the 
Board may grant such a permit for residential use provided 
that: 

(i) It finds that the proposed plan will promote the purposes 
of this section; and 

(ii) Not less than 25% of the area of the tract, exclusive of 
land set aside for road area and parking area, shall be 
Open Land ; and 

(iii) The number of dwelling units shall not exceed the number 
computed by dividing the land area of the tract by the 
minimum lot size otherwise permitted in the zoning district 
or districts in which the land lies: Provided that such 
number may be increased by a percentage equal to the 
percentage of the tract in excess of 25% set aside as 
Open Land but in no event shall said increase be more 
than 25%; and 

(iv) The size of the tract of land is not less than ten times 
the minimum lot size permitted in the Zoning District in 
which the tract is located and land area of not less than 
six times the minimum lot size permitted in said Zoning 
District of the land in the tract shall be usable for 
residential construction; and 

(v) It finds that the sewerage disposal plan and proposed 

facilities are adequate or imposes as a condition of the 
issuance of the permit that approval of such plan and 
facilities be obtained from the Board of Health and the 
Water and Sewerage Board of the Town and the Public Health 
Department of the Commonwealth. 

(3) Open Land shall be: 

(i) Owned by a membership corporation, trust, or association 

201 



whose members are all the owners or occupants of the 
dwelling units in the tract, by the Town, or otherwise 
as the Board may approve; and 

(ii) Restricted by a conservation restriction as defined in 
General Laws, Chapter 185, Section 31, running to the 
Town appropriate to retaining the Open Land predominantly 
in its natural, scenic, and open condition in such form 
as may, after consultation with the Conservation Commis- 
sion, be recommended by the Planning Board and approved 
by the Board of Appeals, the Selectmen, and the Massa- 
chusetts Commissioner of Natural Resources. The applicant 
shall provide satisfactory assurance that such conserva- 
tion restriction, following approvals, has been properly 
recorded in the appropriate Registry of Deeds or Registry 
District and that the interest in land thereby created is 
not subject to any mortgage or security interest; and 

(iii) Further restricted by covenants in deeds to all grantees 
in the tract by recreational, agricultural, conservation, 
or park uses on which no structure may be erected more 
that fifteen feet in height and only as an incident to 
the foregoing uses; and 

(iv) Open to such uses by at least the owners and occupants 
of the dwelling units in the tract; and 

(v) Consist at least to the extent of one half of land usable 
for residential construction; and 

(vi) Open to Town officials for purposes of maintaining public 
facilities; and 

(vii) Subject to such further restrictions and conditions, as 
the Board may impose. 

(4) In connection with an application for a special permit from the 
Board of Appeals under this section, the Planning Board shall 
submit in writing prior to the hearing its recommendation and 
report to the Board of Appeals. Such report may be supplemented 
by a further report if deemed advisable by the Planning Board as 
a result of matters brought out at the hearing, The report of the 
Planning Board shall include at least 

(i) A determination of the "land area" of the tract and of 

the area of the tract "Usable for residential construction," 
Based on a plan submitted by the applicant as prepared 
and certified by a duly qualified civil engineer. 

(ii) An Environmental Impact Statement prepared by a Registered 
Professional Engineer which shall clearly show the relation 
of the proposed project to the total environment of the 
Town and its inhabitants. 



202 



This statement shall include the following general categories as a 
minimum of information to be furnished: 

Natural Environment 

1. Air 

2. Noise 

3. Land 

4. Wildlife 

Man-Made Environment 

1. Surrounding land use 

2. Density 

3. Zoning 

4. Architecture 

5. Historic buildings or sites 

Public Facilities 

1. Water supply, flow, pressure and distribution 

2. Sanitary sewerage, connection, distribution and facilities 

3. Storm drainage facilities 

4. Disposition of storm water 

5. Solid waste disposal 

6. Traffic facilities 

7. Electric power 

8. Gas 

Community Services 

1. Schools 

2. Recreation 

3. Police 

4. Fire 

5. Public Works 

Economic Consideration 

1. Cost-benefit ratio 

2. Time Schedule 

(iii) If private on-lot sewerage systems are proposed, the Board 
may require the applicant to submit soil suitability data 
certified to by a Registered Sanitarian or a Registered 
Engineer concerning observation of test pits. 

(iv) The Planning Board's opinion as to the overall design of the 
plan and the advisability of granting the special permit. 

The Board of Appeals shall give due consideration to the report of the 
Planning Board and, where the decision of the Board of Appeals differs 
from the recommendations of the Planning Board, the reasons therefor 
shall be clearly stated in writing. 

203 



(5) Consistent with the general purposes of this Zoning By-Law and the 
specific purposes of this section, the Planning Board may recommend, 
and the Board may impose, as conditions to the approval of a permit 
hereunder such provisions as to parking, loading, road construction 
and sidewalks, community service and recreational facilities, 
screening, and care and maintenance of Open Land as may be deemed 
advisable for the protection and well-being of the occupants of 
dwelling units in the tract and of the inhabitants of the Town. 

(6) Following the granting by the Board of a Permit under this section, 
the Planning Board may, upon application and for good cause shown, 
amend the plan solely to make changes in lot lines shown on the 
plan; provided, however, that no such amendment shall" 

(i) Grant any reduction in the size or any change in location 
of the Open Land as provided in the Permit; or 

(ii) Increase the number of lots or dwelling units as provided 
in the Permit . 

(7) No lot shown on a plan for which a permit is granted under this 
section may be further subdivided, and a notation to this effect 
shall be shown upon the plan submitted to the Board of Appeals 
and signed by the Planning Board. 

ARTICLE 38. Voted to dismiss this Article. 

As a motion to reconsider Article 16 was made and seconded, it was 
evident that the meeting could not be concluded within the time period 
specified by Town By-law. The meeting was adjourned at 10:50 p.m., to 
be reconvened on May 14, 1974 at 7:30 p.m. at the Amos Clark Kingsbury 
High School. 

Nancy J. PtieAton, 
Town 'Clerk 



May 14, 1974 



The meeting was called to order at 7:50 p.m. after ascertaining a 
quorum was present. 

Reconsideration of Article 16 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law 
and the Zoning Maps of the Town of Medfield by removing the premises 
hereinafter described from the RU-Residential Urban District and placing 
the same in the BI-Business Industrial District; That certain parcel of 
land situated at number 17 on the easterly side of Park Street in 
Medfield, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, and bounded and described as 
follows : 



204 



A certain parcel of land situated on the easterly side of Park 
Street, in said Medfield, being Lot numbered twenty-three (23) 
on a plan made by Wm. E. Mann, dated Oct. 14, 1884 and recorded 
with Norfolk Deeds in Book 590, Page 639, bounded and described 
as follows: 

Beginning on the Westerly corner of the granted premises on 
the easterly side of said Park Street, at land now or formally 
(sic) of J.M.Johnson, thence running northeasterly on land now 
or formally (sic) of said Johnson, Ninety-four (94) feet, more 
or less, to lot twenty-two (22) on said plan; thence turning 
and running southeasterly on said Lot (22) one hundred feet to 
Lot (24) twenty-four on said plan; thence turning and running 
southwesterly on said Lot twenty-four (24) , one hundred and 
three (103) feet and (6) inches to said Park Street, one hundred 
feet (100) to the point of beginning. Containing nine thousand, 
eight hundred and seventy-five (9875) square feet, more or less, 
or however otherwise the same may be bounded or described. 

Being the same premises conveyed by Kenneth R. Clark to Harry 
Leighton by deed dated November 23, 1956, recorded with Norfolk 
Registry of Deeds, Book 3525, Page 95. 

For my title see Estate of Harry R. Leighton, Norfolk Probate 
No. 194530. 

Address of the grantee is 99 North Street, Medfield, Massachusetts 

Or take any other action relative thereto. 

ARTICLE 39. Voted to dismiss this Article. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money to continue the updating of the Master Plan relative to a 
Physical-Economic-Environmental Impact Study of Industrial and Commercial 
Development, or take any action relative thereto. 

ARTICLE 40. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven 
Thousand, Five hundred Dollars ($7,500) for the purpose of the 
continuation of the updating of the Master Plan relative to a 
Physical-Economic-Environmental Impact Study of Industrial and 
Commercial Development. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to approve as Scenic Roads 
Noon Hill Street, Causeway Street and Foundry Street or take any action 
relative thereto. 

ARTICLE 41. Voted to approve as Scenic Roads Noon Hill Street, 
Causeway Street and Foundry Street. 

ARTICLE 42. To hear and act on the reports of any special committee 
appointed at any previous Special Town Meeting or Annual Town Meeting 



205 



or appointed by the Moderator or Selectmen as authorized by the vote of 

the Town. 

ARTICLE 42. No reports to be heard 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for 
the purpose of celebrating the 325th anniversary of the Incorporation 
of the Town of Medfield in 1976 and to celebrate the Bicentennial of 
our Country, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 43. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Fifteen 
Thousand dollars ($15,000.) for the purpose of celebrating the 
325th anniversary of the Incorporation of the Town of Medfield 
in 1976 and to celebrate the Bicentennial of our Country. 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend the existing By-Laws 
by inserting the following new section in Article II: 

Section 26 RECREATION FUND 

The Park and Recreation Commission is hereby authorized to accept 
grants or gifts from the Federal Government, from a charitable 
corporation, from a private corporation or from an individual. 
Such funds as may from time to time be received shall be deposited 
with the Town Treasurer and held as a separate account. 

The Park and Recreation Commission is further authorized to 
deposit to the said fund all sums received in connection with the 
conduct of programs or activities it is authorized to conduct. 

The Park and Recreation Commission may, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, expend funds from the said account for any recreational 
purposes it is authorized to perform without further appropriation, 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 44. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 45. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer from available funds to repair the Bakers 
Pond stone and granite retaining wall on the southeast side; and to 
authorize the Park and Recreation Commission to enter into contracts 
for the work, to approve payment of bills for the work and to accept 
the work when completed, or take any other action relative thereto. 

ARTICLE 45. Voted to dismiss this Article. 

ARTICLE 46. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds for 
paving the parking area adjacent to the Community Center. 

ARTICLE 46. Voted to dismiss this Article. 



206 



ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Selectmen to 
petition Boston Edison Company to install street lighting on the 
following named pole: 

Pole No. 159 on Partridge Road at the corner of Morse Drive 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 47. Voted to instruct the Selectmen to petition Boston 
Edison Company to install street lighting on the following named 
pole: 

Pole No. 159 on Partridge Road at the corner of 

Morse Drive. 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Assessors to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the 
reduction of the Tax Rate, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 48. Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Moderator to 
appoint a committee of Five (5) members and authorize it to make 
arrangements and to spend money appropriated under Article 3 for the 
observance of Memorial Day, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 49. Voted to authorize the Moderator to appoint a 
committee of Five (5) members and authorize it to make arrange- 
ments and to spend money appropriated under Article 3 for the 
observance of Memorial Day. 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following 
named sums as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine 
Lake Cemetery, the interest thereof or as may be necessary for said 
care, viz: 

John Bratsos Lot $100.00 

Elizabeth Moss Lot 200.00 

Burgess Standley Lot 500.00 
Frederick Caraviello Lot 400.00 

Sven Gustavson Lot 200.00 

Mildred McMillan Lot 50.00 

Nolan Flagg Lot 400.00 

Robert Ellena Lot 100.00 

Mary Walsh Lot 100.00 

Ora Thompson Lot 100.00 

Priscilla Outridge Lot 100.00 

Robert L. Scott Lot 200.00 

William Gubas Lot 200.00 

Kenneth Getchell Lot 300.00 

Cecil White Lot 200.00 

Frank Haley Lot 500.00 

ARTICLE 50. Voted to accept the following named sums as Perpetual 
Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the 
interest thereof or as may be necessary for said care, viz: 



207 



John Bratsos Lot $100.00 

Elizabeth Moss Lot 200.00 

Burgess Standley Lot 500.00 
Frederick Caraviello Lot 400.00 

Sven Gustavson Lot 200.00 

Mildred McMillan Lot 50.00 

Nolan Flagg Lot 400.00 

Robert Ellena Lot 100.00 

Mary Walsh Lot 100.00 

Ora Thompson Lot 100.00 

Priscilla Outridge Lot 100.00 

Robert L. Scott Lot 200.00 

William Gubas Lot 200.00 

Kenneth Getchell Lot 300.00 

Cecil White Lot 200.00 

Frank Haley Lot 500.00 

The meeting was adjourned at 9:10 P.M. 

Nancy J. ?*.&!> ton, 

Town Clerk 

A true copy attest: 



Attorney General's approval of Articles 20 and 33 changes in general 
By-laws and Article 37 - change of Zoning By-law received July 8, 1974. 



Nancy J. PfieAton, 
Town Clerk 



Attorney General's approval of Article 18: July 18, 1974 

Boston, Massachusetts 

The foregoing amendment to general by-laws adopted under Article 18 of 
the warrant is hereby approved with the exceptions that section 2 and 
Section 4B are stricken and deleted therefrom. 



RoboAt H. Qwinn, 
Attorney General 



208 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
TOWN WARRANT 

May 6, 1974 

Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said 
County, greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are directed to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in 
elections and in town affairs, to meet at the Amos Clark Kingsbury 
School in said Medfield on Monday the sixth day May A.D. 1974 at 7 : 30 
P.M. then and there to act on the following articles: 

The meeting was called to order at 7:40 by Town Moderator 
William Nourse. 

Following the reading of the service of the Warrant for the 
Meeting, the following actions were taken on the Articles appearing in 
said Warrant. 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money 
from available funds to defray the expenses of operating the public 
schools, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(School Committee) 

VOTE: Voted to transfer the sum of Seventy-six thousand nine 
hundred eleven dollars ($76,911.) from free cash to defray the 
expenses of operating the public schools. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money 
from available funds to Account Al 10-04, Highway Department Maintenance 
funds to 200 operations, for the fiscal period ending June 30, 1974, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to transfer the sum of Eleven Thousand Dollars 
($11,000.) from free cash to Account A100-04, Highway Department 
Maintenance funds to 200 operations for the fiscal period ending 
June 30, 1974. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money 
from available funds to Account All 1-02 Police Department operations, 
for the fiscal period ending June 30, 1974, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Police Department) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this Article. 



209 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money 
from free cash to Account All 1-02 Police Department operations, 100 
Personnel, for the fiscal period ending June 30, 1974, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Police Department) 

VOTE: Voted to transfer the sum of Eight Thousand seven hundred 
dollars ($8,700.) be transferred from Free Cash to Account Alll-02 
Police Department operations, 100 Personnel. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Medfield Charter 
as follows: 

Section 2-2 shall read "Time of Annual Town Meeting for Trans- 
action of Business." 

"The annual town meeting for transaction of business shall 
be held on the last Monday in April." 

Section 2-5 shall read "Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting for 
Transaction of Business." 

"The board of selectmen shall prepare the warrant for the 
annual town meeting for the transaction of business and 
shall each year establish the date at which it is closed 
for the submission of articles. However, in no event shall 
the warrant for each annual town meeting remain open for 
submission of articles beyond March 15." 

The first sentence of Section 2-8 "Warrant Reports" shall read 
as follows: 

"A warrant report for the annual town meeting shall be 
assembled and printed by the board of selectmen and placed 
in distribution to the households of the town not less than 
two weeks prior to the town meeting for transaction of 
business to be held on the last Monday in April." 

The third sentence of Section 2-9 "The Warrant Committee" shall 
read as follows: 

"It shall hold a public hearing not less than thirty days 
prior to the annual town meeting for transaction of business 
to be held on the last Monday in April, to inform the resi- 
dents of the town of its proposed recommendations and to 
hear testimony and argument before publication of its final 

recommendations . " 

The third sentence of Section 3-4 "Fiscal Procedures" shall read 
as follows: 



210 



"They shall deliver this budget to the warrant committee for 
its review and recommendation no later than ninety days before 
the annual town meeting for transaction of business to be held 
on the last Monday in April." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Medfield Town Charter as 
follows: 

Section 2-2 shall read "Time of Annual Town Meeting for 
Transaction of Business." 

"The annual town meeting for transaction of business shall 
be held on the last Monday in April." 

Section 2-5 shall read "Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting for 
Transaction of Business." 

"The board of selectmen shall prepare the warrant for the 
annual town meeting for the transaction of business and 
shall each year establish the date at which it is closed 
for the submission of articles. However, in no event shall 
the warrant for each annual town meeting remain open for 
submission of articles beyond March 15." 

The first sentence of Section 2-8 "Warrant Reports" shall read 
as follows: 

"A warrant report for the annual town meeting shall be 
assembled and printed by the board of selectmen and 
placed in distribution to the households of the town 
not less than two weeks prior to the town meeting for 
transaction of business to be held on the last Monday 
in April." 

The third sentence of Section 2-9 "The Warrant Committee" shall 
read as follows: 

"It shall hold a public hearing not less than thirty 
days prior to the annual town meeting for transaction of 
business to be held on the last Monday in April, to inform 
the residents of the town of its proposed recommendations 
and to hear testimony and argument before publication of 
its final recommendations." 

The third sentence of Section 3-4 "Fiscal Procedures" shall read 
as follows: 

"They shall deliver this budget to the warrant committee for 
its review and recommendation no later than ninety days before 

211 



the annual town meeting for transaction of business to be 
held on the last Monday in April." 

The meeting was adjourned at 8:10 P.M. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested 
copy thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, 
seven days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting 
aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this 23rd day of April A.D. Nineteen 
hundred and seventy-four. 

HcuiAij A. KoJULehoA 
JoA&pk L. MaACyion^tXt 
khXhvJi L. TcihJKVi 

Selectmen of Medfield 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Medfield, Massachusetts 
April 29, 1974 



Norfolk, ss. 



By virtue of this warrant, 1 have notified and warned the inhabitants 

of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections to meet at 

the time and for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of 

said warrant in not less than five public places in the Town of Medfield 

at least seven days before the time of holding the meeting. 

WlLLLam H. Mann, 
Constable of Medfield 
12:45 P.M. 

a true copy attest: 

Nancy J. Pica ton, 
Town Clerk 



212 



TOWN WARRANT FOR STATE PRIMARY 
THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield 

Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in 
Primaries to meet in Memorial School Auditorium 

TUESDAY, THE TENTH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 1974 

at 10:00 o'clock A.M. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the Nomination 
of Candidates of Political Parties for the following offices: 



GOVERNOR 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

TREASURER AND RECEIVER- GENERAL 

AUDITOR OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

COUNCILLOR 

SENATOR 

1 REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER (1) (Except 

Nantucket and Suffolk Counties) 
SHERIFF 



For this Commonwealth 
it 

it 

it 

ii 

ii 

10th Congressional District 
11 2nd Councillor 
" 2nd Middlesex & Norfolk 

Senatorial District 
" 59th Middlesex 

Representative District 
" Norfolk District 

" Norfolk County 
" Norfolk County 



The polls will be open from 10: A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings 
at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 26th day of August A.D. 1974 



A true copy. 
Attest: 



Hcuoiy A. KoJULoheA 
JoAzpk L. M&ncAjon&tte. 
A/tthuA L. Foaaoa 



Selectmen of Medfield 



213 



STATE PRIMARY SEPTEMBER 10, 1974 



Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the meeting was opened at 
10:00 A.M. by the Warden with the reading of the warrant. The ballot 
box having been previously inspected, voting lists displayed and 
specimen ballots posted required by state statute. The workers were 
sworn in and assigned their various posts: John F. Ganley, Warden; 
Clara DeNucci, Deputy Warden; Elmer Portmann, Clerk; Anna Murphy, 
Teller; Mary Lovell, Teller; Frederick Rogers, Teller; Mary MairEtienne, 
Checker; Barbara Connors, Checker; Mabelle Maguire, Checker; Beatrice 
Bangs, Checker. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 p.m. 

After the final tabulation was made, the results were announced 
as follows: 

REPUBLICAN PARTY 



GOVERNOR 

Francis W. Sargent, Farm Street, Dover 
Carroll P. Sheehan, 97 Wendell Park, Milton 
Blanks 



381 

177 

10 



LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

Donald R. Dwight, 46 Decatur Lane, Way land 
Blanks 



480 
88 



ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Charles C. Cabot, Jr. 225 Dedham Street, Dover 
William I. Cowin, 85 Country Club Road, Newton 
Josiah A. Spaulding, Proctor Street, Manchester 
Blanks 



278 
97 

170 
23 



SECRETARY 

John M. Quinlan, 11 Crestwood Circle, Norwood 
Blanks 



461 
107 



TREASURER 

Muriel E. 
Blanks 



Ballantine 



72 
496 



CONGRESSMAN 10th District 

Margaret M. Heckler, 30 Colburn Road, Wellesley 
Blanks 



480 
88 



SENATOR- Second Middlesex and Norfolk District 
David H. Locke, 15 Ordway Road, Wellesley 
Martha Lee Stone, 42 Wachusett Road, Wellesley 
Blanks 



383 

150 

35 



214 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 59th Middlesex District 

George R. Sprague, 200 Lake Street, Sherborn 476 

Blanks 92 

SHERIFF 

Charles W. Hedges, 41 Village Avenue Dedham 408 

Blanks 160 

TOTAL VOTE CAST 568 

DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

GOVERNOR 

Michael S. Dukakis, 85 Perry Street, Brookline 396 

Robert H. Quinn, 32 Auckland Street, Boston 220 

Blanks 9 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

Eva B. Hester, 14 Park Street, Clinton 83 

Christopher A. Ianella, 14 Jaeger Terrace, Boston 220 

John Pierce Lynch, 327 Maple Street, Springfield 45 

Thomas P. O'Neill, 17 Harrison Avenue, Cambridge 194 
Thomas Martin Sullivan, 17 Huckleberry Lane, Randolph 41 

Blanks 42 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Francis X. Bellotti, 120 Hillside Avenue, Q.uincy 154 

Barry T. Hannon, 305 West Street, Braintree 35 
Edward F. Harrington, 732 Great Plain Avenue, Needham 209 

Edward M. O'Brien, 10 Dragon Circle, Easthampton 15 

S. Lester Ralph, 73 Wheatland Street, Somerville 89 

George L. Sacco, 73 Forest Street, Medford 107 

Blanks 16 

SECRETARY 

John F. X. Davoren, 180 Purchase Street, Milford 143 

Paul H. Guzzi, 23 Otis Place, Newton 456 

Blanks 26 

TREASURER 

Robert Q. Crane, 7 Mountview Road, Wellesley 292 
Charles Mark Furcolo, 1137 Massachusetts Avenue, 

Cambridge 285 

Blanks 48 

AUDITOR 

Thaddeus Buczko , 47 Butler Street, Salem 479 

Blanks 146 

CONGRESSMAN 10th District 

Barry F. Monahan, 130 Underwood Street, Fall River 456 

Blanks 169 



215 



COUNCILLOR 2nd District 

George F. Cronin, Jr., 58 Cerdan Avenue, Boston 424 
Blanks 201 

SENATOR 2nd Middlesex and Norfolk 

Francis Morse 18 Reservoir Road, Wayland 433 

Blanks 192 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY Norfolk County 

George G. Burke, 174 Warren Avenue, Quincy 425 

Blanks 200 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER Norfolk County 

Thomas K. McManus „ 20 Shattuck Park Road, Norwood 385 

James J. Heggie, Jr. 41 Will Drive, Canton 113 

Blanks 127 

SHERIFF Norfolk County 

Paul E. Barry, 30 Dysart Street, Quincy 58 

Alan J. Boyd, 89 Walnut Street, Braintree 41 

John H. Brownell, 180 Rock Island Road, Quincy 75 

Clifford H. Marshall, 64 Edison Street, Quincy 235 

George B. McDonald, 133 Grove Street, Quincy 72 

Blanks 144 

TOTAL VOTE CAST 625 

Tellers for counting ballots after the polls were closed were as 
follows: Marion Bosselman, Phyllis Wilmarth, Maybelle Maguire, Beatrice 
Bangs, Florence Roberts, Jean Harding, Barbara Connors, Weston Kolsti, 
Roberta Kolsti, Joan Fuller, Joan Bussow, Lynn Randolph, Clara DeNucci, 
Mary Sharon Ganley, Mary T. Harney, Elizabeth Ipolitti, Eva Grover, 
Janice Ripley, Phyllis Ripley, Dwight Adams, Muriel Harris, Frederick 
Rogers, Mary Lovell, Anna Murphy, Mary Nyren, Steven Rudnick, Richard 
DeSorgher, Marcia Downing. 

After the results were publicly announced, the ballots, tally 
sheets and master sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for safe 
keeping as prescribed by law. 



A true copy attest 



Nancy J. PfizAton, 
Town Clerk 



216 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

October 22, 1974 

Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, 
Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and 
in town affairs, to meet at the Dale Street School Auditorium in said 
Medfield on Tuesday, the 22nd day of October A.D. 1974 at 7:30 P.M. 
then and there to act on the following articles: 

The meeting was called to order at 7:45 p.m. by William Nourse, Moderator 

Following the reading of the service of the Warrant for the meeting, the 
following action was taken on the Articles appearing in said Warrant: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classification 
of Positions and Pay Schedule of the Personnel Administration Plan so 
it reads as follows: 

FULL TIME POSITIONS 



Position 


Minimum 


2nd Step 


3rd Step 


4th Step 


Max. 


STREET, WATER AND 


SEWER 


DEPARTMENT 








Foreman Hourly 


4.22 




4.48 


4.74 


5.00 


5.30 


Equip. Oper . " 














Reparman 


3.86 




4.07 


4.27 


4.53 


4.79 


Heavy Equip 














Oper. " 


3.66 




3.86 


4.07 


4.33 


4.58 


Water Tech. " 


3.66 




3.86 


4.07 


4.33 


4.58 


Lt. Equip. 














Oper. 


3.45 




3.66 


3.86 


4.07 


4.33 


Laborer 


2.63 




2.73 


2.83 


2.99 


3.19 



Snow removal Premium: 50 per cent of hourly rate for time worked 
other than normal schedule. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

*Chief Annual 10,815. to 13,905. 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 
Admin. Sec'y 

Annual 6,757. 7,148. 7,560. 8,003. 8,446. 

Custodian: 
Town Hall Hourly 2.42 2.52 2.63 2.78 2.94 

GENERAL 



217 



Position 



Minimum 



2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Max. 



GENERAL 












Senior 












Sec'y Hourly 


3.09 


3.30 


3.50 


3.71 


3.91 


Coll./Bkpr./ 












Sec'y 


2.68 


2.83 


2.99 


3.14 


3.30 



Full-time employees shall receive an annual longevity payment of $50. 
after 5 years continuous full-time employment plus $10. for each 
additional year of service up to a total maximum of $200. payable on the 
2nd pay day of December. 

REGULAR PART TIME POSITIONS 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 
Custodian Hourly 
Town Hall 2.42 



2.52 



2.63 



2.78 



2.94 



PARK & RECREATION 
Custodian 

Recreation Ctr.2.42 



2.52 



2.63 



2.78 



2.94 



LIBRARY 

Librarian Annual5,789 
Asst. Libr. " 2,987 



6,129. 6,427. 6,747. 7,210 
3,152. 3,332. 3,517. 3,708, 



Children's 

Librarian " 2,987 



3,152. 



3,332. 3,517. 



3,708 



GENERAL 

Coll./ Bkpr. 

Sec'y Hourly 2.68 



2.83 



2.99 



3.14 



3.30 



TAX DEPARTMENT 
Depty. Coll. 
and Bkpr. " 2.73 



2.94 



3.09 



3.24 



3.50 



^Indicates a salaried position not subject to overtime payment 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



(Personnel Board) 



VOTE: 



Voted that the Classification of Positions and Pay Schedule of the 
Personnel Administration Plan be amended as set out in the warrant, 

ARTICLE 2. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to transfer 
from available funds to the following account: 



218 



A100-03 Executive Secretary 100 Personnel 

A107-01 Park and Recreation Adm. 100 Personnel 

A109-00 Town Hall 100 Personnel 

A110-01 Highway Administration 100 Personnel 

A110-04 Highway Maintenance 100 Personnel 

Alll-01 Police Administration 100 Personnel 

A112-01 Fire Administration 100 Personnel 

A130-00 Sanitary Landfill 100 Personnel 

A131-01 Sewer Operations 100 Personnel 

A135-00 Library 100 Personnel 

A140-00 Water 100 Personnel 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the following sums be transferred from free cash 
to the appropriate accounts: 



A100- 


-03 


Executive Secretary 


100 


Personnel 


$1,225. 


A109- 


-00 


Town Hall 


100 


Personnel 


75. 


A110- 


-01 


Highway Administration 


100 


Personnel 


450. 


A110- 


-04 


Highway Operations 


100 


Personnel 


1,125. 


Alll- 


-01 


Police Administration 


100 


Personnel 


75. 


A112- 


-01 


Fire Administration 


100 


Personnel 


250. 


A130- 


-00 


Sanitary Landfill 


100 


Personnel 


250. 


A131- 


-01 


Sewer Operations 


100 


Personnel 


350. 


A135- 


-00 


Library 


100 


Personnel 


275. 


A140- 


-00 


Water 


100 


Personnel 


425. 



ARTICLE 3. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to transfer 
from available funds for the purpose of purchasing insurance providing 
indemnity for town officials designated by the Selectmen for expenses 
or damages incurred by such officials in the defense or settlement of 
claims against them in an amount not to exceed one hundred thousand 
dollars which claims arose while such officials were acting within the 
scope of their official duties or employment as provided by General Laws, 
Chapter 41, Section 100E, or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of Two Thousand Six Hundred twenty-one 
Dollars ($2,621.) be appropriated and transferred from free cash 
for the purpose of purchasing insurance providing indemnity for 
town officials designated by the Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-laws of the 
Town by adding to Article IV a Section 28 as follows: 

PUBLIC DRINKING 

28. (a) Whoever shall, within the limits of any public way located 
within the town, whether that public way be a town way, county 
highway, state highway, or a private way open to the public, consume 



219 



intoxicating beverages, or open any container of alcoholic beverages 
with the intent of consumption shall be punished by a fine not 
exceeding fifty dollars. This section shall also be construed so as 
to prohibit the following: The consumption of intoxicating beverages, 
or opening of any container of alcoholic beverages with the intent of 
consumption, by any person while such person is standing, sitting, 
walking, running, or otherwise present, within such way or is within 
any vehicle, whether parked or moving which is within the limits of 
such public way. 

(b) Whoever shall consume any intoxicating beverages, or open 
any container of alcoholic beverages with the intent of consumption, 
in any public building, or on any public property, including parks, 
cemeteries, school houses and school grounds, and public squares 
shall be punished by a fine not exceeding fifty dollars. The 
Board of Selectmen may make this section of the By-laws applicable 
to any private way or parking area upon written request from the 
owner or other party in control of such private way or parking 
area. 

(c) The foregoing paragraphs (a) and (b) shall not apply to 
any activity duly licensed by the Board of Selectmen under the 
applicable provisions of the Massachusetts General Laws. 

(d) It shall be the duty of any police officer of the town to 
arrest any person who violates the provisions of paragraphs (a) or 
(b) and to cause such person to be brought before a Justice of the 
District Court of Northern Norfolk at Dedham, upon a complaint made 
for violation of this Section. All alcoholic beverages being used 
in violation of this By-law shall be seized and safely held until 
final adjudication of the charge against the person or persons 
arrested or summoned before the court, at which time they shall be 
returned to the person entitled to lawful possession, 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-laws of the 
Town by rescinding Section 13 of Article IV and inserting in its place 
a new Section 13 to read as follows: 

LOITERING 

(a) Whoever continues to stand, sit or loiter in, or about any 
street, sidewalk or any public place so as to obstruct the free 
passage of travellers or vehicles thereon, after being directed by 
a police officer to move on or disperse shall be punished by a fine 
not exceeding twenty-five dollars. 

(b) It shall be the duty of any police officer of the Town to 
order any person, so acting as to obstruct the free passage of 
travellers or vehicles to move on and disperse, and if the person 
so ordered does not forthwith obey to remove such person, or to 

arrest and cause such person to be brought before a Justice of 
the District Court of Northern Norfolk at Dedham, upor a complaint 
made for violation of this Section. All Alcoholic beverages being 

220 



used in violation of this By-law shall be seized and safely held 
until final adjudication of the charge against the person or persons 
arrested or summoned before the court, at which time they shall be 
returned to the person entitled to lawful possession. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to amend the By-Laws of the Town by rescinding Section 
13 of Article IV and insert in its place a new Section 13 as 
written in the warrant except to delete the final sentence of (b) . 
to read as follows: 

LOITERING 

(a) Whover continues to stand, sit or loiter in, or about any 
street, sidewalk or any public place so as to obstruct the free 
passage of travellers or vehicles thereon, after being directed 
by a police officer to move on or disperse shall be punished by 
a fine not exceeding twenty-five dollars. 

(b) It shall be the duty of any police officer of the Town to 
order any person, so acting as to obstruct the free passage of 
travellers or vehicles to move on and disperse, and if the person 
so ordered does not forthwith obey, to remove such person, or to 
arrest and cause such person to be brought before a Justice of 
the District Court of Northern Norfolk at Dedham, upon a complaint 
made for violation of this Section. 

ARTICLE 6. To see what sum the Town will vote to appropriate by 
transfer from available funds for the purpose of employing special 
counsel to defend the Town against a suit brought by Dawn I Austin 
and others to compel the Inhabitants of the Town of Medfield to provide 
funds to the School Committee in addition to those funds appropriated 
by the voters at the Annual Town Meeting and to impose a fine on the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, or take any other action in 
relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate the sum of Five Thousand Dollars 
($5,000.) by transferring it from free cash for the purpose of 
employing special counsel to defend the Town against a suit 
brought by Dawn I. Austin and others. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available 
funds and/or borrow the sum of Six hundred seventy-three dollars 
($673.) for the provisions of transportation costs for educational 
handicapped programs which do not meet the eligible requirements for 
State reimbursement for the fiscal period ending June 30, 1974, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 
221 



VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available 
funds and/or borrow the sum of Three thousand, four hundred thirty 
dollars ($3,430.) for the provisions of transportation costs for 
educational handicapped programs which do not meet the eligible re- 
quirements for State reimbursement for the fiscal period ending June 
30, 1975, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town ByLaws by 
adding the following language to Article II, Section 21: 

"However, in contracts for professional services the Town need 
not secure bids on a competitive price basis. In all such pro- 
fessional service contracts at least two professionals, groups of 
professionals, or associations of professionals shall be asked to 
submit a statement of their qualifications and to make an oral 
presentation concerning their abilities and the services offered 
in the field covered by the proposed contract. All professional 
service contracts entered into by any town department, board, or 
commission shall be printed in full in the next annual town report." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted to amend the Town By-laws as written in the warrant, 
except to add the word "written" before the word "statement" in 
the second sentence so that it reads: 

Article II, Section 21: 

"However, in contracts for professional services the Town need 
not secure bids on a competitive price basis. In all such 
professional service contracts at least two professionals, 
groups of professionals, or associations of professionals 
shall be asked to submit a written statement of their qualifi- 
cations and to make an oral presentation concerning their 
abilities and the services offered in the field covered by 
the proposed contract. All professional service contracts 
entered into by any town department, board, or commission 
shall be printed in full in the next town report." 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law 
by adding the following section to the TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS: 

5. A. 4. 28 Commercial or 

membership tennis 

courts or clubs, including squash and paddle tennis. 

222 



R-E R-T R-S R-U B B-I I-E 

NO NO NO NO SP SP SP 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted to amend the Zoning By-Law by adding the section as 
printed in the warrant except to add the word "tennis before clubs 
so that the amendment reads as follows: 

TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 

VOTE: Voted to amend the Zoning By-Law by adding the following 
section to the TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS as written in the warrant 
except to add the word "tennis" before the word clubs so that it 
reads as follows: 

R-E R-T R-S R-U B R-I I-E 
5. A. 4. 28 Commercial or membership 

tennis courts or tennis 

clubs, including squash 

and paddle tennis. NO NO NO NO SP SP SP 

YES 334 
NO 14 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and 
Zoning maps of the Town of Medfield to include in the Industrial- 
Extensive District (I-E District) Indoor Recreational Facilities (such 
as Tennis Club, Swimming Pool, Hockey Rink) and out door accessory uses 
with a Special Permit (SP) , or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



(Petition) 



VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by 
adding the following to Section 2.1.21: 

"A parcel shall not be designated a lot unless it conforms with 
the TABLE of Area Regulations, Section 6.2. An owner shall retain 
the right to alienate any parcel or portion of any parcel regardless 
of whether or not it is a legal lot under this By-Law." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted to amend the Zoning By-Law by adding the following to 
Section 2. 1.21 



223 



"A parcel shall not be designated a lot unless it conforms with the 
Table of Area Regulations, Section 6.2. An owner shall retain the 
right to alienate any parcel or portion of any parcel regardless 
of whether or not it is a legal lot under this By-Law. 



YES 
NO 



321 

5 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by 
adding Section 6.2.4.1 as follows: 

"Frontage shall be measured at the street line. On corner and 
through lots frontage shall be measured on one street only." 

and by adding to Section 6.2 TABLE OF AREA REGULATIONS an additional 

column as follows: 

District Use 

R-E Any permitted structure or principal use 

R-T Any permitted structure or principal use 

R-S Any permitted structure or principal use 

R-U One- family dwelling 

Two- family dwelling 

Mult i- family dwelling 

Public Housing for the Elderly 

Convalescent or nursing home 

Funeral home or mortuary establishment 

Any permitted community facility 

Any other permitted structure or principal use 



B 



B-I 
I-E 



Any permitted structure or principal use 

Automotive sales, service or repair establishment 

Motion picture or amusement and recreation 

establishment 

Any other permitted structure or principal use 

Any permitted structure or principal use 

Any permitted structure or principal use 



Frontage (ft) 

180 

142 

96 

80 
100 
200 
200 
200 
200 
100 
100 

60 
200 

200 
60 

60 

200 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted to amend the Zoning By-Law by adding Section 6.2.4.1 
as follow9.t 

"Frontage shall be measured at the street line. On corner and 
through lots frontage shall be measured on one street only." 

and by adding to Section 6.2. TABLE OF AREA REGULATIONS an additional 
column as follows: 



224 



District Use Frontage 

(ft.) 

R-E Any permitted structure or principal use 180 

R-T Any permitted structure or principal use 142 

R-S Any permitted structure or principal use 96 

R-U One family dwelling 80 

Two- family dwelling 100 

Multi-family dwelling 200 

Public Housing for the Elderly 200 

Convalescent or nursing home 200 

Funeral home or mortuary establishment 200 

Any permitted community facility 100 

Any other permitted structure or principal use 100 

B Any permitted structure or principal use 60 

Automotive sales, service or repair establishment 200 

Motion picture or amusement and recreation 

establishment 200 

Any other permitted structure or principal use 60 

B-I Any permitted structure or principal use 60 

I-E Any permitted structure or principal use 200 

The vote was unanimous. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel 
Administration Plan by adding the following under Part Time and 
Temporary Positions: 

All .firemen responding to a call will receive a guaranteed minimum 
of two (2) hours fire pay. 

Town employees responding as call firemen will receive one (1) hour 
at their Town job rate for the first hour of the fire's duration. 

Should the fire continue beyond the one (1) hour, normal fire pay 
will apply for the duration of the fire. 

Between the hours of 12:00 midnight and 6:00 A.M. an additional 
premium hour will be guaranteed for all men who respond. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

VOTE: Voted to amend the Personnel Administration Plan by adding 
the following under Part-Time and Temporary Positions: 

All firemen responding to a call will receive a guaranteed minimum 
of two (2) hours fire pay. 

Town employees responding as call firemen will receive one (1) hour 
at their Town job rate for the first hour of the fire's duration. 



225 



Should the fire continue beyond the one (1) hour, normal fire pay- 
will apply for the duration of the fire. 

Between the hours of 12:00 midnight and 6:00 A.M. an additional 
premium hour will be guaranteed for all men who respond. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classification 
of Positions and Pay Schedules of the Personnel Administration Plan 
by deleting the position Dog Officer from the Part Time and Temporary 
section and by adding the following positions: 

FULL TIME POSITION 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Dog Officer Annual $7,800. to $8,500. 

PART TIME AND TEMPORARY POSITION 

Assistant Dog Officer $200. per year and $3.50 per hr, 

when on duty , 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 



VOTE: Voted to amend the Classification of Positions and Pay 
Schedules of the Personnel Administration Plan by deleting the 
position Dog Officer from the Part-Time and Temporary section and 
by adding the following positions: 

FULL TIME POSITION 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Dog Officer Annual $7,800. to $8,500. 

PART TIME AND TEMPORARY POSITION 

Assistant Dog Officer $200. per year and $3.50 per hr. 

when on duty. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available 
funds a sum of money to Park and Recreation Commission A107-01 Adminis- 
tration 200 Operations account to pay an unpaid Boston Edison bill in 
the amount of Three hundred seventeen and 24/100 dollars ($317.24) 
incurred in the fiscal period ending June 30, 1974 or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Park & Recreation Commission) 

VOTE: Voted unaminously to transfer from free cash the amount of 

Three hundred seventeen and 24/100 dollars ($317.24) said amount 

to be credited to the Park and Recreation Commission A107-01 Adminis- 



226 



tration 200 Operations account to pay an unpaid Boston Edison bill. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Selectmen to 
appoint a committee to study the needs for expansion of the Memorial 
Library facilities, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Library Trustees) 

VOTE: Voted that the Selectmen appoint a committee to study the 
needs for expansion of the Memorial library facilities. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Regulations 
Relative to Sewer Assessments as approved on October 1959, Section 2 
so that it reads: 

The owners of the land on both sides of the street benefited by any 
common sewer extension in a public way shall be assessed a total of 
not more than 75% of the total cost thereof, and not to exceed $8.00 
per actual front foot per abutter; no assessment shall be made for 
sewer lines not in a public way, but a connection charge shall be 
made in accordance with Paragraph 6 below when applicable. Asses- 
ments shall be in accordance with the provisions of Section 14 to 24 
inclusive of Chapter 83 of the General Laws. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTE: Voted to amend the Regulations Relative to Sewer Assessments 
as approved on October 1959, Section 2 so that it reads: 

The owners of the land on both sided of the street benefited by any 
common sewer extension in a public way shall be assessed a total of 
not more than 75% of the total cost thereof, and not to exceed $8.00 
per actual front feet per abutted; no assessment shall be made for 
sewer lines not in a public way, but a connection charge shall be 
made in accordance with Paragraphs 6 below when applicable. Asses- 
ments shall be in accordance with the provisions of Section 14 to 24 
inclusive of Chapter 83 of the General Laws. 

YES 229 

NO 66 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Regulations 
Relative to Sewer Assessments as approved in October 1959, Section 3, 
so that it reads: 

Assessments shall be in accordance with the frontage of the land on 
the public way in which the sewer line is laid. There shall be a 
minimum assessment based on frontage equal to the minimum width of 
lot required under the Zoning By-Laws which are in effect at the 
time of the Sewerage Article's passage by Town Meeting; and these 
minimum assessments shall act to decrease the assessments on 
property with frontage greater than the minimum so that the total 
assessments shall not be greater than that corresponding to the 
actual frontage. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Petition) 

227 



VOTE: Voted that under this article the Selectmen be authorized 
and instructed to present to the General Court a petition for the 
enactment of a special act authorizing the Town of Medfield to 
adopt sewer assessment regulations which include a uniform unit 
method of proportioning assessments under Chapter 83 Section 14 
of the Massachusetts General Laws. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:10 P.M. 

A true copy attest: 

Nancy J. Pie^ton, 
Town Clerk 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, 
seven days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings 
thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid, 

Given under our hands this 15th day of October, A.D. Nineteen hundred 
and seventy-four. 

Joseph L. IkaA&lonoJXo, 
AfcthuA L. Ifa/maA. 
Selectmen of Medfield 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 12:30 P.M. 

October 15, 1974 
Norfolk, ss: 

By virtue of this Warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants 
of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections to meet at 
the time and for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said 
Warrant in not less than five (5) public places in the Town of Medfield 
at least seven (7) days before the time of holding the meeting. 

WWLlam H. Mann, 
Constable of Medfield 



January 9, 1975 
Boston, Massachusetts 

The foregoing amendments to general by-laws adopted under Articles 4,5, 
and 9 of the warrant and the amendments to zoning by-laws adopted under 
Articles 10, 12, and 13 of the warrant are hereby approved. 

Rob&U H, Qulnn, 
Attorney General 



228 



WARRANT - THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Wednesday, October 30, 1974 at 12 Noon 

BRISTOL, 
MIDDLESEX, 
NORFOLK, ss. 

To the Registered voters of the Tri-County Regional Vocational 
Technical School District: 

GREETINGS; 

You are hereby notified and warned that the inhabitants of the Tri- 
County Regional Vocational Technical School District registered to vote 
in the member towns of Franklin, Medf ield , Medway, Millis, Norfolk, 
North Attleboro, Seekonk, Sherborn, and Walpole, are to meet and 
assemble at their designated polling places in said cities and towns, 
to wit; in the Town of 



FRANKLIN 

MEDFIELD 

MEDWAY 

MILLIS 

NORFOLK 

NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH 

SEEKONK 

SHERBORN 

WALPOLE 



Franklin High School 

at Memorial School 

at Sanford Hall 

at Memorial School 

at Alvin J. Freeman School 

at the Junior High School 

at Pleasant Street School 

at Fellowship Hall of the Pilgrim Church 

at Blackburn Memorial Building 



ON WEDNESDAY, THE THIRTIETH DAY OF OCTOBER, 1974 at 12 o'clock noon to 
vote by BALLOT on the following questions. 

QUESTION NO. 1 

"Shall the vote of the Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical 
School District School Committee passed on October 9, 1974 authorizing 
the incurring of debt in the amount of $15,000,000. for the purpose of 
acquiring land and constructing and equipping a regional vocational 
technical high school, pursuant to Chapter 71 of the General Laws as 
amended and supplemented, the Regional School District Agreement as 
amended and any other enabling authority, be approved?" 

QUESTION NO. 2 

"Shall the vote of the Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical 
School District School Committee passed on October 9, 1974 authorizing 
the incurring of debt in the amount of $600,000. for the purpose of 
constructing a swimming pool as a part of the project for the construc- 
tion and equipping of a new regional vocational technical high school, 



229 



pursuant to Chapter 71 of the General Laws as amended and supplemented, 
the Regional School District Agreement as amended and any other enabling 
authority, be approved?" 

The polls shall be opened at 12:00 o'clock noon and shall be closed 
at 8: P.M. 

The District Secretary is hereby directed to serve this Warrant by 
posting an attested copy thereof in at least one public place in each 
of the aforesaid member towns of said District and by publishing a 
copy thereof at least once in a newspaper of general circulation in 
the District, said posting and publication to occur at least ten days 
before the day of the election aforesaid. 

Given under our hands and seal of the Tri-County Regional Vocational 
Technical School District this ninth day of October, 1974. 



ROBERT J. RAP PA 
FRANK DeLUCIA 
THOMAS A. PROCOP 
LORING D. MAXWELL 
ROBERT W. MeDONOUGH 
EARL T. WALDRON 



ARTHUR C. HILLMAN 
JOHN C. KRASKOUSKAS 
WILLIAM J. DROHAN, JR, 
MARY ELIZABETH DOWSE 
RICHARD H. HOLMAN 
PHILIP A. MITCHELL 



Tri-County Regional Vocational 
Technical School District 
School Committee 

a true copy attest: 

John Kraskouskas 

This seventeenth day of October 1974 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



October 17, 1974 



NORFOLK, ss. 

By virtue of this Warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants 
of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections to meet at the 
time and for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said 
Warrant in not less than five (5) public places in the Town of Medfield 
at least seven (7) days before the time of holding the meeting. 

Constable 



230 



ELECTION 
TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

October 30, 1974 



Pursuant to the foregoing warrant the meeting was opened at 12 Noon 
by the reading of the warrant. The ballot box had previously been 
checked and found to be in working order, voting list displayed and 
instruction to voters and speciman ballots posted within the polling 
place. 

The following persons were sworn in and assigned John F. Ganley, 
Warden; Clara DeNucci, Deputy Warden; Florence Roberts, Clerk; Frederick 
Rogers, Deputy Clerk; Tellers; Mary MairEtienne, Beatrice Bangs, Anna 
Murphy, Phyllis Ripley, Phyllis Wilmarth. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

Question No. 1 

"Shall the vote of the Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical 
School District School Committee passed on October 9, 1974 authorizing 
the incurring of debt in the amount of $15,000,000. for the purpose of 
acquiring land and constructing and equipping a regional vocational 
technical high school, pursuant to Chapter 71 of the General Laws as 
amended and supplemented, the Regional School District Agreement as 
amended and any other enabling authority, be approved?" 

Yes 327 
No 64 
Blanks 2 

Question No. 2 

"Shall the vote of the Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical 
School District School Committee passed on October 9, 1974 authorizing 
the incurring of debt in the amount of $600,000. for the purpose of 
constructing a swimming pool as a part of the project for the construc- 
tion and equipping of a new regional vocational technical high school, 
pursuant to Chapter 71 of the General Laws as amended and supplemented, 
the Regional School District Agreement as amended and any other enabling 
authority be approved?" 

Yes 176 
No 208 
Blanks 9 

After the final tabulation the results were announced and the ballots, 
tally sheets, and master sheet were turned over to the Town Clerk for 
safe keeping as prescribed by law. 

Nanny J. &i&Aton, 

Town Clerk a true copy attest: 

231 



WARRANT 

STATE ELECTIONS 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1974 



NORFOLK, ss. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, 
greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are directed to notify and warn 
the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections 
to meet at the Memorial School in said Medfield on 

TUESDAY NEXT AFTER THE FIRST MONDAY IN NOVEMBER, IT BEING THE 
FIFTH DAY OF SAID MONTH, IN THE YEAR ONE THOUSAND NINE HUNDRED 
AND SEVENTY-FOUR AT 6:00 A.M. 

in the forenoon to bring in their votes for the following officers 
and question, to wit: 

Governor and Lieutenant Governor; Attorney General; Secretary; Treasurer; 
Auditor; Representative to Congress; Councillor; Senator; Representative 
in General Court; District Attorney; County Commissioner; Sheriff. 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Question No. 1 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution 
summarized below, which was approved by the General Court in a joint 
session of the two branches held August 25, 1971, received 212 votes 
in the affirmative and 39 in the negative, and in a joint session of 
the two branches held June 6, 1973, received 235 votes in the affirma- 
time and 19 in the negative? 

SUMMARY 

The proposed constitutional amendment, if approved, would replace 
the present Article 52 of the Articles of Amendmentto the Constitution 
of the Commonwealth and would empower the General Court, by concurrent 
vote of the two houses, to take a recess or recesses amounting to not 
more than thirty days. The present Article 52 permits such recesses 
but provides that "no such recess shall extend beyond the sixtieth day 
from the beginning of the legislative session. 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Question No. 2 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution 
summarized below, which was approved by the General Court in a joint 
session of the two branches held August 25, 1971, received 177 votes 
in the affirmative and 65 in the negative, and in a joint session of 



232 



the two branches held June 6, 1973, received 166 votes in the affirma- 
tive and 93 in the negative. 

SUMMARY 

The proposed constitutional amendment, if approved, would provide 
for a census in the year 1975 and every tenth year thereafter of the 
inhabitants of each city and town as a basis for determining the repre- 
sentative, senatorial and councillor districts for the ten year period 
beginning with the first Wednesday in the fourth January following 
the taking of the census, provided that the districts as established 
based on the 1971 census shall terminate on the first Wednesday in 
January, 1979. The census shall specify the number of inhabitants 
residing in each precinct of a town and each precinct and ward of a 
city. 

Under the proposed amendment, the House of Representatives would 
consist of 160 members, in contrast to the present membership of 240, 
and the Senate of 40 members. The General Court would at its first 
regular session after the year in which the census divide the common- 
wealth into 160 representative districts and 40 senatorial districts 
of contiguous territory so that each representative and each senator 
will represent an equal number of inhabitants as nearly as may be; and 
such districts shall be formed, as nearly as may be, without uniting 
two counties or parts of two or more counties and with respect to 
representative district, without uniting as nearly as may be, two 
towns or parts of two or more towns, two cities or parts of two or more 
cities, or a city and a town, or parts of cities and towns, into one 
district, and without dividing any town containing less than 2500 in- 
habitants. The General Court would be permitted to pass laws to limit 
the time within which judicial proceedings may be instituted calling in 
question any such division. The proposed amendment further provides that 
every representative, for one year at least immediately preceding his 
election, shall have been an inhabitant of the district for which he is 
chosen, and every senator shall be an inhabitant of this Commonwealth 
for five years at least preceding his election and at the time of his 
election shall be an inhabitant of the district for which he is chosen. 
Every representative and senator shall cease to represent his district 
when he shall cease to be an inhabitant of the Commonwealth. The 
manner of calling and conducting the elections for representatives and 
for senators and councillors and of ascertaining their election, shall 
be prescribed by law. The amendment vests original jurisdiction in 
the Supreme Judicial Court, upon petition of any voter of the Common- 
wealth, filed with the clerk of said court, for judicial relief to the 
establishment of House of Representatives, councillor and senatorial 
districts. 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Question No. 3 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution 
summarized below which was approved by the General Court in a joint 



233 



session of the two branches held June 7, 1972, received 250 votes in 
the affirmative and 3 in the negative and in a joint session of the 
two branches held June 6, 1973, received 253 votes in the affirmative 
and in the negative. 

SUMMARY 

The proposed constitutional amendment would repeal section 2 of 
Article 46 of the Articles of Amendments to the Constitution of the 
Commonwealth (the anti-aid amendment", so called), and replace it with 
a new section 2, for the purpose of allowing grants in aid to private 
higher educational institutions or to students parents or guardians of 
students, attending such institutions. 

The proposed amendment would delete the first clause of the present 
section 2, which requires that all moneys raised by taxation in the 
towns and cities for the support of public schools, and all moneys 
appropriated by the Commonwealth for the support of common schools 
shall be applied to or expended in only those schools conducted accord- 
ing to law under the order and superintendence of the authorities of 
the town or city in which the money is expended. The effect of the 
deletion of the first clause of section 2 would be to remove the consti- 
tutional prohibition against the use of public moneys, which have been 
raised by taxation or appropriated for support of public schools, for 
grants in aid to private higher educational institutions or to students, 
or parents or guardians of students, attending such institutions. 

The proposed amendment would also alter the second clause of the 
present section 2 by removing the prohibition against a grant, 
appropriation or use of public money or property or loan of public 
credit by the Commonwealth or any political sub-division for the 
purpose of founding, maintaining or aiding any school or institution of 
learning, whether under public control or otherwise, wherein any 
denominational doctrine is inculcated, or any other school or any 
college which is not publicly owned and under the exclusive control, 
order and superintendence of public officers or public agents. In 
place of the foregoing, the proposed amendment would prohibit the 
grant, appropriation or use of public money or property or loan of 
credit of the Commonwealth or any political subdivision for the purpose 
of founding, maintaining or aiding any primary or secondary school 
which is not publicly owned and under the exclusive control, order and 
superintendence of public officers or public agents. 

The proposed amendment would also add to the present section 2 a 
provision that nothing therein shall be construed to prohibit grants 
in aid to private higher education institutions or to students, or 
parents or guardians of students, attending such institutions. 

LAW PROPOSED BY AN INITIATIVE PETITION 

Question No. 4 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution 
summarized below, which was approved by the General (Hourt in a joint 



234 



session of the two branches held May 17, 1972, received 131 votes in the 
affirmative and 121 in the negative, and in a joint session of the two 
branches held May 8, 1974, received 139 votes in the affirmative and 119 
in the negative. 

SUMMARY 

The proposed constitutional amendment would revise Article 78 of the 
Articles of Amendment to the Constitution to permit the expenditure of 
money from the highway fund for mass transportation lines and other mass 
transportation purposes in such manner as the Legislature may direct. 
The highway fund includes receipts from fees, duties, excises and license 
taxes relating to registration, operation or use of motor vehicles and 
taxes from the sale of motor vehicle fuels. The expenditure of money 
from such fund is presently restricted to highway and bridge construc- 
tion, reconstruction maintenance and repair, enforcement of state traffic 
laws, and administration of the tax statues which provide highway fund 
receipts. 

QUESTION PROPOSED BY AN INITIATIVE PETITION 

Question No. 5 

Do you approve of a law summarized below which was disapproved in 
The House of Representatives by a vote of 73 in the affirmative and 150 
in the negative and was disapproved in the Senate by a vote of 16 in the 
affirmative and 22 in the negative? 

SUMMARY 

Provisions of the act establish an independent Corrupt Practices 
Commission with five members to be appointed by the Governor to stagger- 
ed five year terms. The Commission has subpoena powers and is to in- 
vestigate, by means of secret hearings, candidates' compliance with all 
state and federal laws relating to political campaign contributions and 
expenditures and corrupt practices. If probable cause is shown, the 
Commission is required to direct the Attorney General to take further 
action in the proper form and is required to make public a report of such 
action. In cases involving the campaign practices of the Attorney Gen- 
eral himself, a special attorney is to be appointed. If no probable 
cause is shown, the Commission is to state so publicly. 

Further, the proposed act extends the application of the current 
statue regarding the disclosure of campaign expenditures and contribu- 
tions, to all candidates for office above the twon and city level, with 
the exception of President and Vice President of the United States. The 
act required all such candidates to receive and disburse all amounts 
greater than $25. by check, and makes it a crime to knowingly receive 
cash payment from a candidate or his committee for a service costing 
more than $25. The act also requires candidates to designate a single 
bank as depository of funds and as recordkeeper , with records of receipts 
and expenditures to be open to public scrutiny. 

Provisions of the act extend present campaign spending limits to 
cover all media expenses and require all media firms (including: 

235 



television, radio, newspaper, billboard, magazine, advertising, public 
relations, printing, opinion polling, computer, telephone, telegraph) 
to report the purchase of media services by candidates. Media expenses 
of candidates for the offices of district attorney, clerk of court, 
register of probate and insolvency, register of deeds, county commission- 
ers, county treasurer and sheriff are limited to $.07 for each resident 
of the respective electoral district. Other provisions of the act 
require candidates, upon official announcement or filing of nomination 
papers, to report all political receipts and expenditures since the date 
of the last general election for the office sought, and count such 
expenditures toward spending limits. The act also limits candidates to 
one political committee. 

The act establishes a maximum penalty of one year imprisonment and/or 
$100,000. fine for individuals engaged in corrupt practices, and a 
$ 500,000 fine for corporations so involved. In addition, the Attorney 
General is permitted to bring an action for the removal of a candidate 
whose election was materially aided by corrupt practices on the part of 
the candidate or one acting in his behalf, where such removal is other- 
wise authorized by law. 

Question No. 6 

Should the General Court enact legislation during the nineteen 
hundred and seventy-five session reorganizing state government by creat- 
ing a Department of Health Systems Regulation which shall have the 
power to administer the medicaid program, control and set rates for 
nursing homes, hospitals, and other health providers under medicaid, 
license and inspect health facilities, and regulate private health 
insurance policies, medical and hospital service plans?" 



And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield 
seven (7) days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting 
aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this 25th day of October, A.D. , Nineteen 
Hundred and Seventy-four. 

HoA/iy A. KzZlzhoJi 
Jo&&pk L. MaAcion2£t& 
khXkwt L. VoJVtaA 



236 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Medfield, Massachusetts 

October 26, 1974 

Norfolk, ss. 

By virtue of this Warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants 
of the Town of Medfield qualified to vote in elections to meet at the 
time and for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said 
Warrant in not less than five (5) public places in the Town of Medfield 
at least seven (7) days before the time of holding the meeting. 

WiZLlam H. Mann, 
Constable of Medfield 



237 



STATE ELECTION 



November 5, 1974 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, the meeting was opened at 6:00 
avrn. by the reading of the Warrant. The Ballot box had been opened and 
inspected; a voting list displayed and instruction to the voters, 
specimen ballots posted and copies of the questions placed in each 
voting booth . 

The following persons were sworn in and assigned to their duties: 
PRECINCT 1 PRECINCT 2 



Warden John F. Ganley Warden 

Clerk Florence Roberts Clerk 

Tellers: Mary MairEtienne Tellers 
Maybelle Maguire 



Elmer 0. Portmann 
Anna Murphy 
Phyllis Ripley 
Marion Bosselman 



PRECINCT 3 



PRECINCT 4 



Warden Clara DeNucci Warden 

Clerk Muriel Harris Clerk 

Tellers: Phyllis Wilmarth Tellers 
Eva Grover 



Evelyn Gronberg 
Jane Kelly 
Beatrice Bangs 
Frederick Rogers 



Tellers for counting ballots after the polls were closed were 



Phyllis Ripley 
Mary MairEtienne 
Barbara Armstrong 
Clara DeNucci 
Mary Sharon Ganley 
Elizabeth Ippoliti 
Jane Kelly 
Mary Love 11 
Anna Murphy 
Louise Pini 
Sarah Regan 
Steven Rudnick 
Richard DeSorgher 
John Downing 
Marcia Downing 
Eva Grover 
Janice Ripley 
Lorraine Ripley 
Roberta Kolsti 
Linda Bohn 
Jane Bus sow 
Stephanie Peck 



Joan Snow 
Martha Welch 
Dwight Adams 
Muriel Harris 
Frederick Rogers Jr. 
Dewey Bernick 
Phyllis Wilmarth 
Maybelle Maguire 
Beverly Smith 
Beatrice Bangs 
Evelyn Gronberg 
Florence Roberts 
Jeanne Harding 
Jane Minesinger 
Jeanne Mikelonis 
Elmer 0. Portmann 
Jessie Portmann 
Weston Kolsti 
Joan Fuller 
Benjamin As t ley 

Jean Sanders 
Lynn Randolph 



238 



Jeannette Lovelace 
Virginia Cusak 



Arlene Rucki 



The polls were declared closed at 8: P.M. 
The total vote cast was 3342. 

After the final tabulation the results were announced as follows: 



PRECINCT 
2 3 



Total 



GOVERNOR & LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 



Sargent and Dwight 
Dukakis and O'Neill 
Gurewitz and Bevins 
Kahian and Greco 
Blanks 



432 


504 


546 


501 


1983 


243 


330 


316 


319 


1208 


4 


7 


9 


7 


27 


19 


12 


37 


14 


82 


9 


13 


6 


14 


42 



ATTORNEY GENERAL 



Francis X. Belotti, Quincy 
Josiah A. Spaulding, Manchester 
Jeanne Lafferty, Boston 
Blanks 



205 


321 


264 


274 


1064 


482 


525 


634 


562 


2203 


11 


10 


8 


10 


39 


9 


10 


8 


9 


36 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



Paul H. 


Guzzi, Newton 


336 


437 


465 


434 


1672 


John M. 


Quinlan, Norwood 


362 


414 


438 


399 


1613 


Blanks 




9 


15 


11 


22 


57 



TREASURER 



Robert Q. Crane, 


Wellesley 


522 


646 


688 


619 


2475 


Blanks 




183 


219 


225 


236 


836 


Scattered 




2 


1 


1 




4 



AUDITOR 



Thaddeus Buczko, Salem 

Blanks 

Scattered 



520 


650 


690 


614 


2474 


186 


216 


223 


241 


866 


1 




1 




2 



CONGRESSMAN 10th District 



Margaret M. Heckler, Wellesley 
Barry F. Monahan, Fall River 
Blanks 



485 


591 


654 


580 


2310 


209 


261 


248 


253 


971 


13 


14 


12 


22 


61 



COUNCILLOR - 2nd District 



George F. Cronin, Jr. , Boston 
Blanks 



497 


593 


648 


590 


2328 


210 


273 


266 


265 


1014 



239 



SENATOR - Middlesex and Norfolk 



Total 



David H. Locke, Wellesley 
Francis Morse, Way land 
Blanks 



415 


490 


546 


480 


1931 


268 


337 


328 


322 


1255 


24 


39 


40 


53 


156 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 



George R. 


Sprague, 


Sherborn 


539 


660 


736 


657 


2592 


Blanks 






168 


206 


177 


197 


748 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY 



George G. 


Burke, Quincy 


500 


613 


665 


597 


2375 


Blanks 




207 


253 


249 


258 


967 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER, NORFOLK 



Thomas K. McManus, 


Norwood 


474 


606 


658 


582 


2320 


Blanks 




233 


260 


256 


273 


1022 



SHERIFF, NORFOLK 



Charles W. Hedges, Dedham 
Clifford H. Marshall, Quincy 
Blanks 



346 


410 


490 


423 


1660 


296 


399 


355 


376 


1426 


65 


66 


69 


56 


256 



Question No. 1 House Recesses 



Yes 

No 

Blanks 



385 


488 


568 


471 


1912 


249 


283 


270 


270 


1072 


73 


95 


76 


114 


358 



Question No. 2 Redistricting 



Yes 

No 

Blanks 



558 


676 


776 


640 


2650 


86 


100 


77 


95 


358 


63 


90 


61 


120 


334 



Question No. 3 Grants in Aid 



Yes 

No 

Blanks 



368 


464 


509 


465 


1806 


270 


311 


335 


272 


1188 


69 


91 


70 


118 


348 



Question No. 4 Transportation Funds 



Yes 

No 

Blanks 



400 


488 


541 


474 


1903 


226 


274 


300 


259 


1059 


81 


104 


73 


122 


380 



240 



428 


502 


572 


501 


2003 


201 


253 


265 


228 


947 


78 


111 


77 


126 


392 



481 


569 


583 


554 


2187 


140 


186 


240 


171 


737 


86 


111 


91 


130 


418 



Question No. 5 Corrupt Practices Commission 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

Question No. 6 Creating of a Dept. of Health Services 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 



A total of 44 Absentee Ballots were cast. 

After the complete tabulation of results were announced, the ballots, 
tally sheets, master sheets and check lists were turned over to the Town 
Clerk for safe keeping as prescribed by law. 

a true copy attest: 

Nancy J. P/ieAton, 
Town Clerk 



241 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1974 



243 



ASSESSORS 



The Board of Assessors in submitting their annual report to the 
taxpayers of Medfield would like, at this time, to reflect back on the 
method of arriving at property values which has been in effect for the 
past twenty years, showing that the Medfield Board of Assessors has 
tried to keep up with the spirit of the law, if not the letter of the 
law, as it relates to full fair cash value. 

1957 : The Town of Medfield had its first revaluation which established 
100% valuations on all taxable property. The Board of Assessors, at 
that time, instituted a ration of 40% of the 100% for the taxing year 
commencing January 1, 195 7. 

1961 : The State Supreme Court made a landmark decision involving 
Bettigole vs. Assessors of the City of Springfield. The decision 
stated that all properties should be assessed at full fair cash value. 
This decision moved the Medfield Board of Assessors to implement 100% 
assessments for the taxing year 1962. 

(Note: The Board was using 40% of 100% of the 1957 revaluation 
figures. ) 

1967: The Medfield Board of Assessors felt that the 1957 values had 



become disproportionate and inequitable and submitted an article for 
another revaluation which was approved and carried out. The fair cash 
value figures were put into effect for the taxing year January 1, 1968. 

1974: In December of 1974 the State Supreme Court ruled in the Sudbury 
Case that all cities and towns must move to implement 100% valuation 
and in so doing must notify the Department of Corporations and Taxation 
on how such valuations are to be achieved. 

1975 : The Medfield Board of Assessors, in order to comply with the 
court decision, will be submitting an article in the Annual Town Meeting 
requesting monies for the purpose of carrying out a complete revaluation 
of all real, personal, and tax-exempt property in order to implement 
these values for the taxing year commencing July 1, 1977. 



Our customary report follows: 

Town Appropriations 

Total Appropriations Voted from 
Available Funds: 
In 1974 

Deficits - 1971 Overlay 



$5,825,877.00 

456,563.00 $6,282,440.00 

318.72 



Offsets to Cherry Sheet 

Special Education 8,341.00 

School Lunch Program & Elderly Lunch 17,319.56 

Free Public Libraries 3,682.88 



29,343.44 



244 



County Tax and Assessments: 
County Tax 

County Tax - Underestimate 
County Hospital 



129,681.98 
2,716,24 
8,999.19 



141,397.41 



State Tax and Assessments: 
State Recreation Areas 
Audit of Municipal Accounts 
Area Plan Council 

Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 
Mosquito Control Projects 
Mosquito Control Projects - Underest. 
Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 
Air Pollution Control 
Special Education - 766 

Overlay 

GROSS AMOUNT TO BE RAISED 



40,555.19 

440.80 

421.40 

57,761.00 

8,315.79 

637.87 

1,253.40 

564.98 

11,000.00 



120,950.43 
67,969.79 
$6,642,419.79 



Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 
1975 Fiscal Year Estimated Receip 
certified by Commission 
Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 
Licenses 
Fines 

Special Assessments 
General Government 
Health and Sanitation 
School 

Public Service Enterprises 
Interest 
Farm Animal 



Overestimates 



ts 



$1,794,735.23 

349,038.98 

26,744.63 

1,510.31 

16,662.27 

4,137.07 

2,551.20 

758.01 

134,178.71 

33,197.82 

8.35 

$2,363,522.58 

3,433.96 



Amounts voted to be taken from 

Available Funds: 

4-30-74 Art. 8 

4-30-74 Art. 8 

4-30-74 Art. 8 

4-30-74 Art. 8 

4-30-74 Art. 8 

4-30-74 Art. 9 

4-30-74 Art. 10 

5-6-74 Art. 21 

5-6-74 S.T.M. Art. 1 

5-6-74 " Art. 2 

5-6-74 Art. 4 



NET AMOUNT TO BE RAISED BY TAXATION 



26,012.04 

13,240.14 
49,153.79 
126,584.07 

35,009.96 

20,000.00 

34,000.00 

55,952.00 

76,911.00 
11,000.00 
8,700.00 
$ 459,996.96 $2,823,519.54 

$3,818,900.25 



245 



Personal Property 
Real Estate 



Tax Rate: $55.75 

Water Betterments 
Water Liens 



1,687,370.00 
66,812,990.00 
68,500,360.00 



94,070.88 
3,724,829.37 
$3,818,900.25 $3,818,900.25 



2,573.16 
7,778.02 



$3,829,251.43 
Respectfully submitted, 



MoZvWLd J. UlZJU, Chairman 

RogeA E. Ha/idy 

Jo&zpk S. Kunntdy 

Board of Assessors of Medfield 



246 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTION 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 





1973 




1974 


1974 


TOTAL 


LEVY OF 


BALANCE 


COLLECTED 


BALANCE 


BALANCE 


1968 


259.00 




259.00 


.00 




1969 


9.50 




.00 


9.50 




1970 


64.80 




.00 


64.80 




1971 


141.18 




39.29 


101.89 




1972 


1,223.77 




275.78 


947.99 




1973 


794.90 




405.63 


389.27 




1974 


— 


41 


,934.99 


253.75 


1,767.20 






REAL 


ESTATE TAXES 




1966 


18.40 




.00 


18.40 




1967 


67.87 




.00 


67.87 




1968 


259.19 




.00 


259.19, 




1969 


923.90 




4.18 


919.72 




1970 


2,042.38 




635.69 


1,406.69 




1971 


5,134.64 




530.61 


4,604.03 




1972 


12,374.76 


4 


,454.35 


7,920.41 




1973 


76,504.49 


52 


,643.92 


23,860.57 




1974 


— 


1,618 


,012.54 


52,312.36 


91,369.24 






WATER LIENS ADDED 


TO TAXES 




1967 


65.76 




.00 


65.76 




1969 


99.35 




.00 


99.35 




1970 


51.40 




298.96 


(247.56) 




1971 


77.49 




.00 


77.49 




1972 


28.07 




.00 


28.07 




1973 


663.05 




364.89 


298.16 


321.27 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES 



1968 


10.45 




.00 




10.45 




1969 


176.68 




171.60 




5.08 




1970 


773.33 




102.26 




671.07 




1971 


767.33 




131.45 




635.88 




1972 


2,085.59 


1 


,013.81 


1 


,071.78 




1973 


34,638.66 


29 


,814.74 


4 


,823.92 




1974 


— 


22 


,643.96 


102 


,288.22 


109,506.40 



The above report covers a six month transitional period for the 
tax year ending June 30, 1974. 

Respectfully submitted, 



ChaAleA H. RayneA, J/i. 
Collector of Taxes 



247 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



For the Period: January 1, 1973-June 30, 1974 



RECEIPTS 



Balance Cash on Hand January 1, 1973 



$ 672,104.53 



Taxes : 

1973-1974 

Previous years 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

Water and Sewer Betterments 

Tax interest & Certification of Liens 

State Tax - Local Aid 

Tax Titles 

Farm Animal Excise Tax 



$5,016,330.16 

87,242.03 

427,492.48 

17,625.19 

12,182.37 

118,424.69 

2,833.98 

10.84 



5,682,141.74 



Licenses and Permits: 
Gas Permits 
Wiring Permits 
Building Permits 
Plumbing Permits 
Swimming Pool Permits 
Other Licenses and Refunds 
Street Listings and Executive 

Department Licenses 
Veteran Aid Refunds 
Health Permits 



1,150.00 
2,734.50 
7,054.75 
2,649.00 
1,612.25 
2,156.90 

17,674.17 

132.00 

4,886.20 



40,049.77 



Grants from State - County & Federal Govts 
Dept. Natural Resources 
Schools - Building Program 
Schools - Other 
Highways - State & County Aid 
1971 Census 
State Lottery Aid 
Veterans' Services 
Sewer Extensions 
Library - Dog Tax, etc. 
County Tax 
Police Dept. 



42,252.00 

155,951.34 

1,602,629.89 

163,577.38 

2,468.75 

50,550.41 

10,532.55 

1,209,678.00 

11,603.85 

20,345.55 

995.00 



3,270,584.72 



Departmental Revenue: 
Planning Board 
Sealer 

Water - Refunds 
Town Hall - Refunds 
School - Sales of Materials, etc. 
Police - Special Duty Detail 



1,060.63 

27.50 

351.71 

7.00 

1,941.84 
35,396.76 



248 



Highway - Refunds 

Fire Insurance - School 

Police Cruiser 

Appeals Board 

Ambulance Fees 

Library Fines and Refunds 

Court Fines 

Cancelled Checks 

Blue Cross Insurance Refund 

Accrued Interest 

Water Department: 
Sale of Water 
Water Services 

Cemetery: 

Sale of Lots and Graves, etc. 

Interest on Trust Funds: 
Library 

Granville F. Dailey - Library 
Cemetery Perpetual Care 
Clara S. Littledale - Library 
Conservation Funds 
Revenue Sharing 

Loans : 

Anticipation Tax Revenue 

Highway 

Sewer Extension 

Reserve Funds: 

School - Adult Education 

School - Athletic Association 

School - Cafeteria 

Library 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 

Conservation 

Dog Taxes 

Group Insurance 

County Retirement 

Teachers' Insurance 

Federal Withholding Taxes 

State Withholding Taxes 

Teachers' Retirement 

Stabilization Fund 

Federal - Revenue Sharing Fund 

Available Funds - Invested 

Total Receipts and Cash on Hand 



1,805.64 

15,413.49 

994.54 

1,042.25 

4,766.60 

2,738.23 

2,538.31 

151.40 

46.54 

106,156.07 



186,807.44 
7,314.55 



1,212.91 

6,356.97 

8,490.46 

199.33 

162.63 

12,367.12 



1,500,000.00 

66,159.00 

1,745,000.00 



7,232.00 

11,098.25 

283,324.16 

1,616.70 

8,920.00 

10,120.00 

6,204.95 

81,561.68 

46,709.08 

74,831.40 

752,774.51 

201,442.38 

181,024.45 

34,000.00 



$ 174,438.51 

194,121.99 
3,772.00 



28,789.42 



3,311,159.00 



1,700,859.56 

230,815.00 

14,635,745.35 

$29,944,581.59 



249 



EXPENDITURES 1/1/73 - 6/ '30/7 '4 



General Government: 
Executive 

Executive Secretary 
Treasurer 
Town Accountant 
Collector 
Assessors 
Town Clerk 

Election & Registrations 
Town Hall 
Counsel 

Warrant Committee 
Planning Board 
Personnel Board 
Assessors' Plans 
Housing Study Committee 
Town Garage Construction 

Protection of Persons & Property: 

Gas Inspector 

Plumbing Inspector 

Wiring Inspector 

Building Inspector 

Police 

Fire 

Fire Vehicles Purchase 

Sealer 

Moth Control 

Care of Trees 

Mosquito Spray 

Dutch Elm Disease 

Ambulance 

Police Cruisers 

Dog Officer 

Civil Defense 

School Traffic - Police 

Police Transmitters 

Police - Special Duty Detail 



28,738.51 
27,816.80 
16,318.46 

9,553.05 
20,391.23 
34,656.46 

7,406.40 

12,398.14 

29,243.38 

10,879.02 

75.43 

7,664.09 
648.14 

2,330.00 

1,000.00 
139,356.82 



1,416.80 
2,545.55 
3,916.60 

10,700.46 
271y829.44 

60,678.76 

15,460.64 

389.42 

6,044.00 

11,322.39 
2,250.00 
2,531.00 
7,166.40 

31,754.81 
2,205.30 
2,026.01 

16,236.10 
7,722.70 

37,117.88 



$ 348,475.93 



$ 493,314.26 



Health & Sanitation: 
District Nurse 
Health 

Sewer Maintenance 
Sanitary - Landfill 
Garbage Removal 
Sewer-Construction 

Highways: 
Highways 
Highways - Chapter 81 



3,125.00 
11,101.25 
17,569.32 
30,137.68 
27,000.00 
2,634,506.18 



186,314.67 
27,870.85 



$2,723,439.43 



250 



Traffic Guide Lines 

Snow & Sanding 

Garage - Maintenance 

Upham Road 

Chapter 90 - Highways - Route 27 

Street Lighting 

Mowing Machine & Salt Spreader 

Sidewalks 

Veterans' Benefits: 

Veterans' Services and Aid 

School and Library: 
Schools 

Regional Vocational H.S. 
Athletic Association 
Cafeteria 
Library 

Norwood Mental Health Center 
Junior - Senior High School 
Adult Education 
School Roofing 

Public Law 89 - 210 Voc. Educ. 
Planning Committee 

Water and Cemetery: 
Water - Maintenance 
Cemetery 

Miscellaneous : 

Tax Interest - Refunds 

Land Damages 

Memorial Day 

Appeals Board 

Real Estate Tax - Refunds 

Parks 

Town Meetings 

Town Report 

Motor Excise Tax - Refunds 

County Retirement System 

Camp - Handicapped Children 

Water Assessments - Refunds 

Aging Committee 

Conservation & Land Purchase 

Bakers Pond 

Master Plan 

Swimming Pond 

Recreation - Youth Program 

Skating Pond 



5,587.93 
64,015.85 

5,375.06 

6,071.94 
85,497.64 
26,350.73 

7,155.54 
910.77 



4,909,284.69 

10,431.18 

14,234.67 

271,406.55 

52,236.87 

7,250.00 

8,964.10 

10,913.00 

21,496.00 

49,886.01 

350.00 



91,701.82 
26,107.78 



45.22 

8,131.49 

950.73 

1,549.73 

24,349.78 

11,033.73 

3,810.71 

9,628.46 

14,406.93 

76,916.41 

3,106.92 

104.88 

1,961.66 

27,124.68 

2,390.00 

9,880.00 

19,393.82 

16,201.08 

434.45 



$ 415,150.98 



12,231.97 



5,356,453.07 



117,809.60 



231,420.68 



251 



State and County Taxes: 
Parks & Reservations 
County Tax 
State Audit 

Mosquito Control - County 
County Hospital 
Motor Excise Tax Bills 
Metropolitan Planning 
Massachusetts Bay T.A. 
State Air Pollution 

Town Debt: 

Maturing Debt 
Temporary Loans 
Interest on Debt 
Highway Loans 

Insurance: 

Vehicle Liability 
Workmen's Compensation 
Group Accident & Life 
Public Liability 
Indemnity Insurance 

Trust or Agency Funds: 
Cancelled Checks 
Library 
Dog Taxes 

Federal Withholding Taxes 
State Sales Tax 

Group Accident & Life Insurance 
Stabilization Funds 
Cemetery Funds 
State Withholding Taxes 
County Retirement Funds 
Mass. Teachers' Insurance & 
Retirement Funds 

Available Funds - Invested 



23,159.37 

85,388.66 

437.76 

7,227.79 

1,235.72 

840.90 

421.40 

72,747.84 

287.02 



465,600.00 

1,500,000.00 

313,069.96 

66,159.00 



9,800.00 
23,813.00 
75,067.70 
20,127.85 

2,492.36 



86.40 

6,530.87 

5,467.55 

752,774.51 

159.26 

77,383.56 

1,972.61 

8,920.00 

201.,442.38 

46,709.08 



$ 191,746.46 



2,344,828.96 



131,300.91 



254,163.72 1,355,609.94 
15,977,359.10 



Cash on Hand and in Bank: 
June 30, 1974 

Total Expenditures and Cash on Hand 



245,440.30 
$29,944,581.59 



252 



OUTSTANDING DEBT ACCOUNTS 



June 30, 1974 



Net Funded or Fixed Debt 



$4,889,000.00 



Outside Debt Limit: 

Junior - Senior High School 
Memorial School 
Memorial School Addition 
Elementary School 
Ralph Wheelock School 



$ 450,000.00 

40,000.00 

225,000.00 

980,000.00 

1,275,000.00 



2,970,000.00 



Inside Debt Limit: 

Smith Pumping Station 
Fire Station 
Elm Street Highways 
Sewer Extension 



60,000.00 

10,000.00 

14,000.00 

1,835,000.00 



1,919,000.00 



DEBT BY YEAR OF MATURITY 



(Principal Only) 



1974 (6 mos.) 


$379,000.00 


1975 


450,000.00 


1976 


425,000.00 


1977 


395,000.00 


1987 


365,000.00 


1979 


365,000.00 


1980 


290,000.00 


1981 


290,000.00 


1982 


290,000.00 


1983 


280,000.00 



1984 
1985 
1986 
1987 
1988 
1989 
1990 
1991 
1992 
1993 



$255 

170 

170 

170 

170 

85 

85 

85 

85 

85 



,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 



253 



Balance Sheet - June 30, 1974 



Cash in Banks Invested and Office 



Accounts Receivable: 



$1,634,331.05 



Tax Levy 






1966 


$ 18.40 




1967 


67.87 




1968 


259.19 




1969 


929.22 




1970 


1,471.49 




1971 


4,705.92 


v 


1972 


8,868.40 




1973 


24,260.29 


40,580.78 


Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes: 






1968 


10.45 




1969 


5.08 




1970 


671.03 




1971 


635.88 




1972 


1,071.78 




1973 


4,863.52 




1974 


102,288.22 


109,545.96 



Special Assessments: 



Water: 


Betterments 


Levy: 


1967 




1970 




1972 




1973 


Committed Interest 



Special Taxes in Litigation 



Tax Titles and Possessions: 



54.24 

8,775.02 

25.11 

16.87 

428.95 



9,300.19 
3,353.01 



Tax Titles 


6,860.19 




Tax Possessions 


525.25 


7,385.44 


Departmental Accounts Receivable; 






Ambulance 


5,641.80 




Cemetery Annual Care 


5,041.00 




Cemetery Sale of Lots 


240.00 




Police Off-Duty Details 


1,413.37 


12,336.17 


Water: Liens Added to Taxes 






Levy: 1967 


65.76 




1969 


99.35 




1971 


77.49 




1972 


38.62 




1973 


321.00 


i 



254 



Rates 

Services 

Sales & Use Tax 



$18,601.71 

4,427.47 

593.67 



Aid to Highways: 




State 


482.49 


County 


1,786.62 


Unprovided for: 




Overlay 1969 


440.42 


1971 


560.12 


Land Takings 


518.89 


State Mosquito Control 


4.40 


Air Pollution 


854.74 



24,225.07 



2,269.11 



2,378.57 



TOTAL ASSETS 



$1,845,705.35 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 



State & County Assessments: 
M.B.T.A. 

Parks and Reservations 
Metropolitan Planning District 
County Tax 

Payroll Deductions : 
Retirement Plans 
Group Insurance 

Guarantee Deposits: 
Planning Board 

Agency : 

Water Sales Taxes 
Dog Taxes 

Tailings: Unclaimed Checks 

Trust Fund Income: 
Conservation 
Library 
Cemetery 

Federal Grants: 

Occupational Education P/L 89.576 
Schools P/L 88.210 
Titles I, II, III, & V 
Revenue Sharing Funds 
Revenue Sharing Income 



1,006.93 

8,285.77 

924.78 

1,337.79 



11,555.27 



5,140.74 




5,154.49 


10,295.23 




13,190.04 


593.67 




671.40 


1,265.07 




3,103.03 


267.58 




3,020.41 




5,990.97 


9,278.96 


9,601.55 




32.20 




22,106.22 




198,092.00 




12,367.12 


$242,199.09 



255 



Revolving Funds: 

School Cafeteria $ 918.32 

School Athletic Association 12,148.89 $ 13,067.21 



Appropriation Balances: 

Sewer Extensions 325,936.18 

Schools 209,205.58 

Stabilization Account 32,147.48 

Water Extensions 46,613.64 

All Other 36,038.19 649,941.07 

Highway Construction 55,952.00 

Sale of Real Estate 3,000.00 

Reserve Fund Overlay Surplus 1,535.89 

Overlays Reserved for Abatements 

Levy: 1968 6,586.00 

1970 4,724.82 

1972 475.73 

1973 28,185.63 39,972.18 

Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 

Farm Animal Excise 4.49 

Motor Vehicle Excise 109,545.96 

Special Assessment 9,300.19 

Special Taxes in Litigation 3,353.01 

Tax Title and Possession 7,385.44 

Departmental 12,336.17 

Water 23,029.18 

Aid to Highways 2,269.11 167,223.55 

Surplus Revenue 624,126.76 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $1,845,705.35 



256 



TRUST ACCOUNTS 



PRINCIPAL 



Balance - June 30, 1974 

Funds in Custody of Town Treasurer: 

Library — Granville F. Dailey Trust 
Clara S. Littledale Trust 
Library Trust Funds 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 

Stabilization Fund 

Custody of Selectmen: 

Moses Ellis Post #117 G.A.R. 



$462,516.29 



$ 88,896.99 

2,453.50 

9,000.00 

83,680.00 

270,266.75 



$456,486.17 
$ 6,030.12 



INCOME & DISBURSEMENTS 



Library — Granville F. Dailey Trust: 
Balance - January 1, 1973 

INTEREST INCOME: 

Appalachian Power Co. 

American Tel. & Tel. Company 

Armco Steel Corp. 

Atchinson, Topeka & Sante Fe R.R. 

C.I.T. Corporation 

General Electric Corp. 

General Motors 

G.M. Acceptance 

International Bank Reconst. & Dev. 

New England Telephone 

Niagara Mowhawk Power Corp. 

Ohio Power Co. 

Southern California Power Co. 

Southwestern Gas & Electric 

Southern Bell Telephone 

New Jersey Bell Telephone 

Dedham Inst, for Savings 

Newton Savings Bank 

Total Receipts 

Transfer to Library 
Commission Paid § Reserves 

Balance - June 30, 1974 



$ 6,330.87 



370.00 
262.50 
261.00 
300.00 
310.24 
210.00 
260.00 
397.83 
180.00 
208.14 
108.75 
208.14 
625.00 
370.00 
262.52 
429.97 
1,551.68 
1,204.67 



10,203.78 
1,163.47 



$ 7,520.44 

$13,851.31 

11,367.25 

2,484.06 



257 



204.67 




459.70 




523.67 




24.87 


1,212.91 




$1,437.52 




$1,437.52 



Library Trust Income: 

Balance - January 1, 1973 224.61 

Interest on Savings Accounts: 
Dedham Inst, for Savings 
Providnet Inst, for Savings 
Union Warren Savings Bank 
Needham Cooperative Bank 



Transferred to Library 



Cemetery Perpetual Care Income: 

Balance - January 1, 1973 2,715.40 

Interest on Savings Accounts: 
Home Savings Bank 155.52 

Dedham Institution for Savings 2,648.36 

Union - Warren Savings Bank 1,553.45 

Needham Cooperative Bank 4,127.38 

Lincoln Savings Bank 5.75 . 8,490.46 

11,205.86 

Transferred to Cemetery Operating Expenses 5,214.89 

Balance - June 30, 1974 5,990.97 



Conservation Trust Income: 

Balance - January 1, 1973 104.95 

Interest on Savings Accounts: 
Union-Warren Savings Bank 162.63 

267.58 

Balance June 30, 1974 267.58 



The foregoing report is an account of the financial transactions 
and standing of the Town of Medfield for the eighteen-month fiscal 
period ending June 30, 1974. 

LqaILz J. HowlQJX 
TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



258 



REPORT OF TOWN TREASURER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Citizens of Medfield: 

STATEMENT OF CASH 

Cash in banks December 31, 1973 $ 615,982.37 
Receipts 1974 - Including 22,620,289.57 

Investments 
Disbursements 1974 - Including 22,517,744.65 

Investments 

Cash in banks December 31, 1974 $ 718,527.29 

STATEMENT OF INVESTMENTS 

General Fund $ 950,000.00 

Stabilization Fund 252,593.33 

Sewer Project Funds 410,000.00 

Federal Revenue Sharing Funds 0.00 

Investments December 31, 1974 1,612,593.33 

Total Cash and Investments December 31, 1974 $ 2,331,120.62 

INTEREST EARNED ON INVESTMENTS 

General Fund $ 69,238.42 

Stabilization Fund 16,326.58 

Sewer Project Funds 34,507.29 

Federal Revenue Sharing Funds 5,274.14 

Highway Funds, Chapter 1140 2,219.15 

Interest received 1974 $ 127,565.58 
Interest earned but not received 1974 14,960. 27 

Total Interest earned 1974 $ 142,525.85 

FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING FUNDS 

Cash in bank December 31, 1973 $ 4.90 
Investment in Certificate of Deposit 106 785.00 
due February 21, 1974 

Total Revenue Sharing Funds $ 106,789.90 

December 31, 1973 



259 



Distributions received 1974 $ 131,530.00 
Interest earned on Investments 1974 5,274. 14 



136,804.14 



Total Revenue Sharing Funds 1974 $ 243,594.04 

Transferred to Article 8 $ (221,987.96) 

Voted Annual Town Meeting 1974 
Transferred to Article 9 ( 20,000.00) 

Voted Annual Town Meeting 1974 

$(241,987.96 ) 

Cash in bank December 31, 1974 $ 1,606.08 

For two successive years the cash position of the Town of Medfield 
has been greater than the previous year. This improved liquidity en- 
abled us to invest, within the limits of the law, at high rates of 
return; with the result that the amount of interest earned in 1974 was 
nearly double the amount of interest earned in 1973. 

Undoubtedly the best indicator of this favorable liquid position 
is the fact that we have not borrowed in anticipation of revenue since 
July 11, 1973. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Edwa/td F. Ba/UieXt, J/l. 
Town Treasurer 



260 



PERPETUAL CARE 

Joseph and Hope Burke Lot $500.00 

Walter and Evelyn Reynolds Lot 600.00 

Rebel Palumbo Lot 100.00 

Sadie Mafusie Lot 600.00 

Ralph Parmigiane Lot 100.00 

Joseph DeMezza Lot 300.00 

Joel Goldthwait Lot 600.00 

Frank Simonetti Lot 200.00 

Robert H. Finn Lot 400.00 

Richard Smallwood Lot 50.00 

William Bartlett Lot 200.00 

Thomas Copithorne Lot 120.00 

Ronald and Margaret Curry Lot 400.00 

Richard Tomney Lot 800.00 

Emilio DeFlumero Lot 200.00 

George and Lillian Paras chos Lot 200.00 

Mabel Maguire Lot 200.00 

John J. Norton Lot 100.00 

Francis X. Linse Lot 400.00 

Jaquin Pires Lot 100.00 

Burgess Standley Lot 500.00 

Patrick Connolly Lot 400.00 

Donald and Marion Inman Lot 200.00 

Romolo DeVenanzi Lot 400.00 



261 



TOWNOFMEDFIELD 

WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



NORFOLK, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said 
County, greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote 
in elections and in town affairs to meet at the Memorial School, 
in said Medfield, on Monday, the thirty-first day of March A.D. , 
1975 at 6:00 o'clock A.M., then and there to act on the following 
articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected 
annually by ballot, viz: 

One Moderator for one year. 

One member of the School Committee for two years. 

One Selectman, one Assessor, two members of School Committee, 

two Library Trustees, one Treasurer, and three Park Commissioners, 

all for three years. 

One member of Planning Board, and one member of Housing 
Authority, both for five years. 



BALLOT QUESTIONS 

Question 1 Beano Question 

Shall the Town vote to allow granting of licenses for the operation, 
holding or conducting of the game commonly called Beano, or substan- 
tially the same game under another name, in connection with which 
prizes are offered to be won by chance? 



Yes 
Summary 



No [ 



If the majority of the votes on this question are in the affirma- 
tive, the State Lottery Commission may grant licenses for the 
operation, holding or conducting of Beano games for prizes, in 
the Town of Medfield to certain fraternal, religious, public 
service and charitable organizations. 



262 



Question 2 Charter Amendment 

Shall the Town Charter be amended by making the changes proposed by the 
Special Town Meeting of May 6, 1974 as follows: 

Section 2-2. shall read "Time of Annual Town Meeting for Transaction 
of Business." 

"The annual town meeting for transaction of business shall 
be held on the last Monday in April." 

Section 2-5. shall read "Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting for Trans- 
action of Business." 

"The board of selectmen shall prepare the warrant for the annual 
town meeting for the transaction of business and shall each year 
establish the date at which it is closed for the submission of 
articles. However, in no event shall the warrant for each annual 
town meeting remain open for submission of articles beyond March 15." 

The first sentence of Section 2-8 "Warrant Reports" shall read as follows: 

"A warrant report for the annual town meeting shall be assembled 
and printed by the board of selectmen and placed in distribution 
to the households of the town not less than two weeks prior to 
the town meeting for transaction of business to be held on the 
last Monday in April." 

The third sentence of Section 2-9 "The Warrant Committee" shall read as 
follows: 

"It shall hold a public hearing not less than thirty days prior 
to the annual town meeting for transaction of Business to be held 
on the last Monday in April, to inform the residents of the town 
of its proposed recommendations and to hear testimony and argument 
before publication of its final recommendations." 

The third sentence of Section 3-4 "Fiscal Procedures" shall read as 
follows: 

"They shall deliver this budget to the warrant committee for its 
review and recommendation no later than ninety days before the 
annual town meeting for transaction of business to be held on 
the last Monday in April." 

Yes | I No 

Summary 

If the majority of the votes on this question are in the affirma- 
tive, the amendments will bring the time of the Warrant Report and 
Warrant Hearing closer to the time of the Annual Town Meeting 
for transaction of business. 

The polls will be opened at 6:00 o'clock A.M. and shall be closed 
at 8:00 o'clock P.M. 

263 



On Monday, the twenty-eighth day of April A.D. 1975 commencing at 
7:30 P.M., the following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark 
Kingsbury School Gymnasium in said Medfield, viz: 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the 
several Town Officers for the past year. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or transfer 
from available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any 
other Town Officer, Board, Commission and Committee to defray operating 
expenses of the Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1975, or 
such other sums as the Town may determine as required by General Laws, 
Chapter 41, Section 108, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1975 
in accordance with the provisisons of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
4, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and 
to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17 , 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector to use all 
means in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to 
that office. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensa- 
tion of the following elected officers: 

Moderator 

Town Clerk 

Treasurer 

Selectmen 

Assessors 

School Committee 

Trustees of Public Library 

Collector of Taxes 

Planning Board 

Park and Recreation Commissioners 

Housing Authority 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classification of 
Positions and Pay Schedule of the Personnel Administration Plan so that 
it reads as follows: 

FULL TIME POSITIONS 

Position Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

*Chief Annual 13,375 to 17,655 

Sergeant Annual 11,754 12,243 12,859 

Patrolman Annual 9,565 10,236 11,022 11,754 

264 



Position Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 

STREETS, WATER AND SEWER DEPARTMENT 
*Supt'd't Annual 14,445 to 19,260 

Foreman Hourly 4.52 4.79 5.07 5.35 5.67 
Wastewater Treatment Plant! 
Oper. in Charge Hr. . 4.24 4.52 4.79 5.07 5.35 
Operator Hourly 3.92 4.13 4.35 4.63 4.90 
Equip. Oper. 

Repairman Hourly 4.13 4.35 4.57 4.85 5.13 
Heavy Equip. 

Operator Hourly 3.92 4.13 4.35 4.63 4.90 
Water Technician " 3.92 4.13 4.35 4.63 4.90 



3.92 


4.13 


3.92 


4.13 


3.69 


3.92 


2.81 


2.92 



Lt. Equip. 
Operator Hourly 3.69 3.92 4.13 4.35 4.63 

Laborer Hourly 2.81 2.92 3.03 3.20 3.41 

Snow Removal Premium: 50 per cent of hourly rate for time worked other 

than normal schedule. 100 per cent of hourly rate for time worked on 
Sundays and holidays. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 
*Chief Annual 11,572 to 14,878 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 
*Exec. Sec'y Annual 13,910 to 21,400 
Admin. Sec 1 y Annual 7,657 8,081 8,529 9,001 9,500 
Custodian: 
Town Hall Hourly 2.59 2.70 2.81 2.97 3.15 

GENERAL 

Senior Sec'y Hourly 3.31 3.53 3.75 3.97 4.18 

Coll./Bkpr./ 
Sec'y Hourly 2.87 3.03 3.20 3.36 3.53 

Dog Officer Annual 8,346 to 9,095 
Full-time employees shall receive an annual longevity payment of $50. 
after 5 years continuous full-time employment plus $10. for each addi- 
tional year of service up to a total maximum of $200. , payable on the 
2nd pay day of December. 

REGULAR PART TIME POSITIONS 

Position Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 
Custodian: Hourly 
Town Hall 2.59 2.70 2.81 2.97 3.15 

PARK AND RECREATION 
Custodian: Hourly 
Recreation Center 2.59 2.70 2.81 2.97 3.15 



265 



Position 

LIBRARY 

Librarian Annual 
Asst. Libr. Annual 
Children's 
Librarian Annual 

GENERAL 

Coll./Bkpr./ 
Sec'y Hourly 
TAX DEPARTMENT 
Deputy Coll. 
and Bkpr. Hourly 



Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 



6,194 
3,196 

3,196 



2.87 



2.92 



6,558 
3,373 

3,373 



3.03 



3.15 



6,877 
3,565 

3,565 



3.20 



3.31 



7,219 
3,763 

3,763 



3.36 



3.47 



* Indicates a salaried position not subject to overtime payment. 

PART TIME AND TEMPORARY POSITIONS 



7,715 
3,968 

3,968 



3.53 



3.75 



Position 

Ambulance E.M.T.: 
Attendant 
Serviceman 
Animal Inspector 
Beach: "Water Front Director 

*Asst. Water Front Dir. 
^Swimming Instructor 
^Lifeguard Instructor 
"Lifeguard 
Skating Program Director 
Skating Supervisor 
Building Inspector 
Building Inspector (Acting) 
Cemetery Foreman 
Clerk: Typist 
Deputy Collector 
Assistant Dog Officer 
Fire: Call Firefighters 
Deputy Chief 
Captain 
Lieutenant 
Clerk 
Gas Inspector 
Gas Inspector (Acting) 
Laborer 

Laborer, Skilled 
Library: Aide 

Senior Aide 
Custodian & Maint. 
Playground Counselor 
Playground Director 
Plumbing Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector (Acting) 
Police Intern 
Police Matron 
Poll Worker 



per season 
per season 



Rate 

$4.01 per hour 

$2.68 per run subject to $27. min. per month 

$460. per year 

$1,391 to $1,712 per year 

$86. to $112. per wk. , $749 min. per season 

$2.68 per hour 

$2.14 to $2.57 per hr. , $642. min, 

$2.14 to $2.30 per hr., $535. min, 

$4.17 per hour 

$3.64 per hour 

$6.63 per inspection, $1,284 min. per year 

$6.63 per inspection, $171. min. per year 

$3.05 per hour 

$2.30 to $3.05 per hour 

Fee 

$214. per year and $3.75 per hour when on duty 

$3.90 to $4.06 per hour*** 

$697. per year 

$234. per year 

$177. per year 

$177. per year 

$6.63 per inspection; $353. min. per year 

$6.63 per inspection; $ 64. min. per year 

$2.14 to $2.94 per hour 

$2.34 to $3.21 per hour 

$2.14 to $2.68 per hour 

$2.57 to $3.05 per hour 

$1,659. to $2,349. per year 

$2.14 per hour 

$96. to $139. per week 

$6.63 per inspection; $1,049. per year 

$6.63 per inspection; $241. per year 

$100 to $130. per week.** 

$3.10 to $3.64 per hour 

$2. 62 per hour 



266 



Position Rate 

Recreation Coordinator $70. to $86. per week 

Registrar $134 per year 

Registrar, Clerk $321. per year 

Sanitation Inspector $4.01 per inspection 

Sealer of Weights & Measures $225. per year 

Secretary $2.62 to $3.32 per hour 

Special Police Officer $4.01 per hour 

Permanent Intermittent Police $4.01 per hour 

Town Accountant $3,745 per year 

Town Counsel $2,654. to $6,634. per year 

Traffic Supervisor $3.10 to $3.64 per hour 

Tree Warden/ Insect Pest Control $4.92 per hour 

Tree Climber $2.89 to $4.60 per hour 

Truck Driver $2.68 to $3.96 per hour 

Veterans' Agent $1,500. per year 

Wiring Inspector $6.63 per inspection; $583. min. per year 

Wiring Inspector (Acting) $6.63 per inspection; $171. min. per year 

When an hourly paid employee is called in to work on an emergency assignment 
he shall receive no less than two (2) hours pay at this straight time hourly 
rate. This does not apply to planned overtime. 

* Season is 10 weeks. 

** Police Intern will receive 7% improvement per successive year in the 

Intern program. 
*** 1. All firemen responding to a call will receive a guaranteed minimum 

of 2 hours fire pay. 

2. Town employees responding as call firemen will receive 1 hour at 
their Town job rate for the first hour of the fire's duration. 

3. Should the fire continue beyond the 1 hour, normal fire pay will 
apply for the duration of the fire. 

4. Between the hours of 12:00 midnight and 6:00 A.M. an additional 
premium hour will be guaranteed for all men who respond. This means that 
once a fire goes into the second hour an additional hour of pay will be 
added, i.e. 2 hours becomes 3, 3 hours becomes 4, etc. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administra- 
tion Plan by adding to Section 15. Holidays 

Martin Luther King Day 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 



267 



ARTICLE 9. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or transfer from available funds to establish and 
maintain a back-up emergency ambulance service or do or act anything 
in- relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate sums 
of money for the purchase of equipment for the Street, Water, Sewer and 
Landfill departments as listed and authorize the Selectmen to trade as 
part of the purchase price or transfer to other town departments equip- 
ment to be replaced: 



To Be Acquired 

1. Pickup Truck 1/2 ton 

2. Pickup Truck 3/4 ton 

Cabinet body 

3. Air Compressor 

4 . Dump Truck 

5 . Pickup Truck 

with dump body 

6. Street Sweeper 

7 . Do zer-Lo ader 

8. Salt Spreader 



Department 
Street 
Water 



Trade 
1970 Dodge Pickup 
1970 Chevrolet 



Street, Water & No trade (new) 
Sewer 



Street 

Street 

Street 

Landfill 

Street 



1966 White Dump 
Transfer to Landfill 

1971 International Chassis 

1969 Wayne Sweeper 

1970 Cat 955 
No trade (new) 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Transpor- 
tation Aid Account the sum of $27,976. received in accordance with 
Chapter 825 of the Acts of 1974 and to borrow the sum of $27,976. the 
Town's 1976 allotment from Chapter 765 of the Acts of 1972, and to 
borrow the sum of $4,026., the unexpended balance of the Town's 1975 
allotment of Chapter 765 for the purpose of reconstructing North Street 
from Main Street northerly for a distance of approximately 1,600 feet 
(300' northerly of Green Street), and to authorize the Selectmen to 
enter into any and all contracts necessary or incidental thereto; said 
funds may be used in conjunction with any funds alloted by the County, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen in the name and behalf of the Town of Medfield to remise and 

release to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts through its Department of 
Public Works all right, title, claim and demand whatsoever as said 



268 



Grantor has, or ought to have, in and to a certain Vehicular bridge 
being Bridge M-ll-7 and being identified as Railroad Bridge No. 38.15, 
said bridge being a continuation and, extension of a public way known as 
Curve Street in the Town of Medfield providing Vehicular passage for the 
public over the tracks now or formerly of the Penn Central Railroad, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 

sum of $24,000. for the replacement of guard fences and posts on Main 

Street (Route 109) between Bridge Street and the Millis town line, said 

appropriation to be offset by funds received in accordance with Chapter 

497 of the Acts of 1971 and to authorize the Selectmen to enter into 
any and all contracts necessary or incidental thereto, or do or act 

anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for 
the reconstruction of Janes Avenue from North Street easterly for a 
distance of 300 feet or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds the sum of $20,000. 
for the purpose of resurfacing a section of High Street (Route 27) , said 
appropriation to be offset by funds received in accordance with Chapter 
497 of the Acts of 1971 and to authorize the Selectmen to enter into 
any and all contracts necessary or incidental thereto; said funds may be 
used with any funds alloted by the County; or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. (Street, Water and Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to 
appoint a Building Code Board of Appeals for the purpose of hearing 
appeals pertaining to a Building Inspector's actions in accord with the 
provisions contained in the State Building Code, Section 126.8 which 
became effective on January 1, 1975, said Board to consist of five (5) 
members, one member to be appointed for five (5) years, one member to 
be appointed for four (4) years, one member for three (3) years, one 
member for two (2) years, and one member to serve for one (1) year, and 
thereafter, each new member is to serve for five (5) years or until his 
successor has been appointed or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to appoint a committee of five or more persons to prepare 
plans and specifications for construction of, and select a site for a 
facility for use as a Police Station, said committee to include Police 
Chief and a member of the Warrant Committee, and to raise and appro- 
priate and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the pur- 
poses of this article, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Police Department) 

ARTICLE 18. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds for the prupose of 



269 



purchasing a new 1,000 gallons per minute Class A Pumper for the Fire 
Department, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to trade or sell a 
1941 Ford 500 gallons per minute Pumper for part of the purchase price, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Fire Department) 

ARTICLE 19. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds for the 
purpose of installing traffic and pedestrian control signals at the 
intersection of North Meadows Road and West Street, or take any action 
relative thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 20. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds for the 
purpose of installing traffic and pedestrian control signals at the 
intersection of North Meadows Road and Dale Street, or take any action 
relative thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 21. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or borrow and /or transfer from available funds to 
install a 1 million gallon standpipe on Mt. Nebo, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. (Water and Sewer Board) 

ARTICLE 22. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds to install 
a 12 inch water main from Main Street in a right of way to Bow Street, in 
Bow Street, Hillcrest Road, and Rolling Lane to a parcel of land owned 
by the Town on Mt. Nebo, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewer Board) 

ARTICLE 23. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds to in- 
stall a 12 inch water main from Foundry Street via Philip Street and in 
a right of way to the standpipe on Mt. Nebo, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. (Water and Sewer Board) 

ARTICLE 24. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds to 
extend the 12 inch water main in Rocky Lane, approximately 2300 feet, 
to the 8 inch main in Granite Street, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. (Water and Sewer Board) 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the 
construction of street sewers in: 

Longmeadow Road 
Spring Valley Road 

Woodfall Road 
Stonybrook Road 
Evergreen Way 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Water and Sewer Board) 



270 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or 
borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for preparing 
of final plans including construction plans for interceptors for the 
sewer system, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewer Board) 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of 
Chapter 475 of the Acts of 1974 so that Traffic Supervisors may be 
elgible to join the Norfolk County Retirement System or do or act any- 
thing in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 28. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or borrow for the purpose of planning and constructing 
a public parking area and appurtenances on property owned by the Town 
located at the rear of the Town Hall or to do or act anything in rela- 
tion thereto. (Development & Industrial Commission) 

ARTICLE 29. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, and/or borrow for the purpose of redesigning, reconstructing 
and beautifying the area owned by the Town located in front of the Town 
Hall or to do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Development & Industrial Commission) 

ARTICLE 30. To hear and act on the reports of any special committee 
appointed at any previous Special Town Meeting or Annual Town Meeting 
or appointed by the Moderator or Selectmen as authorized by the vote 
of the Town. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the 
following named streets, or parts thereof: 



Carmen Circle 


Station 


0+0 t 


Eastmount Road 


Station 


2+50 


Evergreen Way 


Station 


13+40 


Fieldstone Drive 


Station 


0+60 


Grace Drive 


Station 


0+0 t 


Indian Hill Road 


Station 


14+00 


Lee Road 


Station 


13+24 


Longmeadow Road 


Station 


10+65 


Nauset Street 


Station 


0+0 t 


Oxbow Road 


Station 


1+97. 


Ridge Road 


Station 


11+15 


Spring Valley Road 


Station 


0+25 


Steven Lane 


Station 


0+0 t 


Surrey Run 


Station 


25+67 


The Paddock Lane 


Station 


21+32 


Wilson Street 


Station 


0+25. 



o Station 9+16.20 

to Station 6+63.96 

.05 to Station 29+10.63 

to Station 1+51.59 

o Station 10+15 

to Station 38+00 
.12 to Station 14+90 
.77 to Station 21+66.46 
o Station 13+55.43 
43 to Station 6+17.43 
.35 to Station 18+73.62 
to Station 11+11.44 
o Station 8+84.84 
.34 to Station 28+83.30 
.00 to Station 25+19.46 
00 to Station 4+29.81 



as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to 
in the Orders of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or other- 
wise, such rights, titles and easements, including drainage easements as 
may be necessary to accomplish such purposes, or take any other action 
relative thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 



271 



ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purpose of 
providing recreation for the physically and mentally handicapped, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or borrow a sum of money for the repair, improvement and beautifica- 
tion of Bakers Pond, also known as Meeting House Pond, and adjacent area, 
said funds may be used with any State, Federal or other funds that may 
be available and to authorize the Park and Recreation Commission to apply 
for and receive any such funds , or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. (Park & Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer from available funds and/or borrow a sum of money for the 
purpose of recreational development at Metacomet Park and to authorize 
the Park and Recreation Commission to apply for and receive any Federal 
and State funds which may be available for this purpose, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. (Park & Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer from available funds and/or borrow a sum of money for the 
purpose of recreational development of Cpl. Stephen Hinkley Memorial 
Park, and to authorize the Park and Recreation Commission to apply for 
and receive any Federal and State funds which may be available for this 
purpose, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Park & Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer from available funds and/or borrow a sum of money for 
the purpose of recreational facilities at the Hospital Road 56-acre site, 
and to authorize the Park and Recreation Commission to apply for and 
receive any Federal and State funds which may be available for this pur- 
pose, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for 
the purpose of celebrating the 325th anniversary of the Incorporation 
of the Town of Medfield in 1976 and to celebrate the Bicentennial of 
our Country, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(325th Anniversary and Special 
Bicentennial Committee) 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate Three 
Thousand Dollars ($3,000.) to be disbursed by the Historical Commission 
as matching funds for the republication of William S. Tilden's History 
of Medfield , said money to be expended only in the event that an equal 
amount is raised for the same purpose by the Historical Society from 
other sources and that the Historical Society enter into an agreement 
that the Town is to be reimbursed to the extent of Three Thousand 
Dollars ($3,000.) from the first proceeds derived from the sale of the 
books after payment of publication costs, or to do or act anything in 
relation thereto. (Historical Commission) 

i 

272 



ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following 
Regulations : 

REGULATIONS RELATIVE TO SEWER ASSESSMENTS 

1. The following regulations shall apply to all extensions since 
January, 1970 of the common sanitary sewer system at the expense 
of the Town, and to the entry of "particular" sewers into the 
common sewer system, except when a variance from these regulations 
to apply to a specific project is voted at any Town Meeting. 

2. The owners of the land on both sides of the street benefited by 
any street sewer extension or installation in a public way shall be 
assessed a total of not more than 50% of the total cost thereof. No 
assessment shall be made for sewer lines not in a public way, but 

a connection charge shall be made in accordance with paragraph 6 
below when applicable. Assessments shall be in accordance with 
the provisions of Sections 14 to 24 inclusive of Chapter 83 of the 
General Laws, and any Special Acts that pertain to Medfield. 

2. (a) Street sewers cost shall be limited to the following items: 

8" pipe including excavation and associated costs 

Y branches 

House connections 

Chimneys 

Manholes 

Drop Connections 

Stubs 

Pavement 

Police 

Clean-up 

Calcium 

Engineering 

as these pertain exclusively to a street sewer project, and as 
defined in the Town Meeting article that authorizes the project. 

3. Assessments shall be apportioned 50% based on the uniform unit 
method as defined by the General Court, and 50% on actual linear 
foot frontage. 

4. There shall be no double or overlapping assessments; a corner lot 
which can be drained into a common sewer on one street shall be 
exempted in assessing for the second street to the extent that all 
or a portion of the lot is not benefited. At the end of a common 
sewer extension, all lots which can be served shall be fully 

assessed, except that no assessment shall be made beyond a line 
120 feet from the last manhole. Exemptions from assessments shall 
be made for property owned by the Town and for rights of way 
deeded and dedicated to public use. No land shall be assessed which 

by reason of its grade or other cause cannot be drained into the 
sewer. These exemptions shall not act to increase the assessments 
on property not exempted. 

273 



5. Assessments shall become liens on the lands benefited, which liens 
shall be filed in the Registry of Deeds. With respect to land not 
built upon, or not yet connected to the common sewer system, the 
time allowed for payment of the assessment together with interest 

at 5% per annum (increased to 5% per annum in accordance with Massa- 
chusetts General Laws Chapter 80, Section 13) shall be extended to 
a date 3 months after the land is built upon or connected, but in 
no case for more than 10 years. For the purpose of these regula- 
tions "land not built upon" shall include any lot or area in one 
ownership which is suitable for building purposes under the Zoning 
By-Law, and which is set aside from any other land in the same 
ownership which is built upon by definite boundaries as shown on 
a plan or in a description filed with the Water and Sewerage Board 
within 60 days after the sewer line is available for service. 

6. The total cost of laying and connecting an individual or "particu- 
lar" sewer to the common sewer system shall in every case be borne 
by the property owner. In addition, when property not abutting on 
a public way, or not previously assessed for any reason becomes 
connected to a common sewer line installed by the Town, a Connec- 
tion Charge shall be made in lieu of an assessment. This Connec- 
tion Charge shall be equal in amount to the minimum assessment as 
determined under Paragraph 3 above for the most recent common 
sewer extension installed by the Town; frontage to be based on 
zoning then in effect in the district where the property lies. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to approve Wight Street and 
Farm Street as scenic roads, or take any action related thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and /or borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money for 
the use of the Board of Assessors for the purpose of revaluing all real 
and personal property within the Town of Medfield, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. (Board of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Assessors to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the 
reduction of the Tax Rate, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law 
and the Zoning Map of the Town of Medfield by removing the premises 
hereinafter described from the RU-Residential Urban District and placing 
the same in the B-Business District. 

Two certain parcels of adjoining land, with the buildings 
thereon, situated on the Northeasterly side of Frairy Street, 
in Medfield, Norfolk County, Massachusetts and together bounded 
and described as follows: 



274 



SOUTHWESTERLY by Frairy Street, 169.75 feet; 
NORTHWESTERLY by Cottage Street, on two courses measuring 

40.65. feet and 103.12 feet, respectively; 
NORTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of Old Colony Railroad 

Company, 174.00 feet; and 
SOUTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of Anthony DeFrancisco, 

117.39 feet. 
Said premises contain 23,024 square feet of land, more or less 
and are shown as lot A. and lot B. on a certain plan recorded 
with Norfolk County Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 1061 of 1948 
in Book 2794, Page 524. 

or take any other action relative thereto. (Petition) 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and 
the Zoning Map of the Town of Medfield by removing the premises herein- 
after described from the RU-Residential Urban District and placing the 
same in the B-Business District. 

That certain parcel of vacant land situated on the Westerly side 
of Frairy Street, in Medfield, Norfolk County, Massachusetts and 
being bounded and described as follows: 

EASTERLY by Frairy Street, 150.00 feet; 

SOUTHERLY by land now or formerly of Belmont, indicated on 

the plan hereinafter referred to, 161.8 feet; 
WESTERLY by land now or formerly of Robert R. Palson, 

indicated on said plan, 120.00 feet; and 
NORTHERLY by Lot 8, shown on said plan, 172.1 feet. 
Said premises contain 21,900 square feet of land and are shown 
as Lot 9 and Lot 10 on a certain plan recorded with Norfolk County 
Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 522 of 1952 in Book 3084, Page 179. 

or take any other action relative thereto* (Petition) 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to repeal the Dog Control 
By-Law (Leash Law) adopted by the Town under Article 18 of the Warrant 
for the 1974 Annual Town Meeting, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. (Board of Selectmen for the Petitioners) 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Moderator to 
appoint a committee of Five (5) members and authorize it to make arrange- 
ments and to spend money appropriated under Article 3 for the observance 
of Memorial Day, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named 
sums as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake 
Cemetery, the interest thereof or as may be necessary for said care, viz 



275 



Joseph and Hope Burke Lot $500.00 

Walter and Evelyn Reynolds Lot 600.00 

Rebel Palumbo Lot 100.00 

Sadie Mafusie Lot 600.00 

Ralph Parmigiane Lot 100.00 

Joseph DiMezza Lot 300.00 

Joel Goldthwait Lot 600.00 

Frank Simonetti Lot 200.00 

Robert H. Finn Lot 400.00 

Richard Smallwood Lot 50.00 

William Bartlett Lot 200.00 

Thomas Copithorne Lot 120.00 

Ronald and Margaret Curry Lot 400.00 

Richard Tomney Lot 800.00 

Emilio DeFlumero Lot 200.00 

George and Lillian Paraschos Lot 200.00 

Mabel Maguire Lot 200.00 

John J. Norton Lot 100.00 

Francis X. Linse Lot 400.00 

Jaquin Pires Lot 100.00 

Burgess Standley Lot 500.00 

Patrick Connolly Lot 400.00 

Donald and Marion Inman Lot 200.00 

Romolo DeVenanzi Lot 400.00 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested 
copy thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, 
seven days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting 
aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this eleventh day of February, A.D. , 
Nineteen Hundred and Seventy-five. 



HaAAij A. KdULzk&i 

Jo&ojph L. Ma/Lcione£t& 

fovtkixx L. foAAOA 
Selectmen of Medfield 



276 



Notes 



INDEX 

Page 

Town Officers Elected 5 

Appointments by Board of Health 16 

Appointments by Collector 18 

Appointments by Fire Chief 18 

Appointments by Park & Recreation 16 

Appointments by Planning Board 16 

Appointments by Selectmen 7 

Appointments by Town Clerk 18 

Appointments by Town Moderator 17 

Appointments by Treasurer 19 

DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Aging, Council on 64 

Ambulance 38 

Anniversary Committee 85 

Appeals on Zoning, Board of 48 

Building Code Committee 74 

Civil Defense 39 

Conservation Commission 55 

Development & Industrial Commission 80 

Dog Officer 72 

Fire Department 34 

Health, Board of 60 

Historical Commission 82 

Housing Authority 53 

Inspector of Animals 75 

Inspector of Buildings 73 

Inspector of Gasf ittings . 76 

Inspector of Plumbing 76 

Inspector of Wires 77 

Jury List 96 

Library Trustees 50 

Master Plan Implementation Committee 47 

Memorial Library 51 

Mental Health & Retardation Area Board 95 

Mosquito Control, Norfolk County 70 

Park & Recreation Commission 67 

Planning Board 42 

Police Department . , 36 

Regional Refuse Disposal Planning 78 

School Planning and Building Committee 94 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 77 

Selectmen, Board of 22 

Streets, Water & Sewer, Superintendent of 30 

Tree Warden 69 

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School 92 

Veterans f Services 70 

Water & Sewerage Department 41 



278 



INDEX 

Page 
SCHOOL DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Adult Education 141 

Amos Clark Kingsbury School . . . 128 

Athletic Director 142 

Buildings and Grounds Director , 151 

Dale Street School 122 

Ralph Wheelock School 124 

Enrollment Commentary 115 

Junior High School 126 

Graduation Exercises , High School . 130 

Guidance Report 134 

Instructional Materials Centers 137 

Memorial Elementary School 121 

Occupational Educational 139 

School Committee 100 

School Health Department 148 

School Lunch Program 144 

Special Services, Director of 135 

Summer School , 146 

Superintendent of Schools 101 

Teachers ' Directory 102 

TOWN CLERK'S RECORD: 

Births 155 

Marriages 158 

Deaths 162 

TOWN MEETINGS AND .ELECTIONS : 

Annual Town Election, March 25, 1974 164 

Warrant and Proceedings, Annual Town Meeting, April 29, 1974 . 168 

Warrant and Proceedings, Special Town Meeting, May 6, 1974 .. 209 

Warrant for State Primary, September 10, 1974 213 

Proceedings of State Primary 214 

Warrant & Proceedings, Special Town Meeting, October 22, 1974 217 

Warrant for Vocational School Election, October 30, 1974 229 

Proceedings of Vocational School Election, October 30, 1974 . . 231 

Warrant for State Election, November 5, 1974 232 

Proceedings of State Election 238 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting 1975 262 

FINANCIAL REPORTS: 

Assessors ' Report 244 

Perpetual Care 261 

Tax Collector 247 

Town Accountant 248 

Treasurer 259 



279 



Notes 



Notes 



Notes 



Notes 



Notes 



Notes 



Notes 



Notes